Cataract

Cataract Publications

Roohipoor R, Yaseri M, Teymourpour A, Kloek C, Miller JB, Loewenstein JI. Early Performance on an Eye Surgery Simulator Predicts Subsequent Resident Surgical Performance. J Surg Educ 2017;Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine early performance on an eye surgery simulator and its relationship to subsequent live surgical performance in a single large residency program. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, Department of Ophthalmology. METHODS: In a retrospective study, we compared performance of 30 first-year ophthalmology residents on an eye surgery simulator to their surgical skills as third-year residents. Variables collected from the eye surgery simulator included scores on the following modules of the simulator (Eyesi, VRmagic, Mannheim, Germany): antitremor training level 1, bimanual training level 1, capsulorhexis level 1 (configured), forceps training level 1, and navigation training level 1. Subsequent surgical performance was assessed using the total number of phacoemulsification cataract surgery cases for each resident, as well as the number performed as surgeon during residency and scores on global rating assessment of skills in intraocular surgery (GRASIS) scales during the third year of residency. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between each of the simulator performance and subsequent surgical performance variables. We also compared variables in a small group of residents who needed extra help in learning cataract surgery to the other residents in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relationships between Eyesi scores early in residency and surgical performance measures in the final year of residency. RESULTS: A total of 30 residents had Eyesi data from their first year of residency and had already graduated so that all subsequent surgical performance data were available. There was a significant correlation between capsulorhexis task score on the simulator and total surgeries (r = 0.745, p = 0.008). There was a significant correlation between antitremor training level 1 (r = 0.554, p = 0.040), and forceps training level 1 (r = 0.622, p = 0.023) with primary surgery numbers. There was a significant correlation between forceps training level 1 (r = 0.811, p = 0.002), and navigation training level 1 (r = 0.692, p =0.013) with total GRASIS score. There was a significant inverse correlation between total GRASIS score and residents in need of extra help (r = -0.358, p =0.003). CONCLUSION: Module scores on an eye surgery simulator early in residency may predict a resident׳s future performance in the operating room. These scores may allow early identification of residents in need of supplemental training in cataract surgery.

Turalba A, Cakiner-Egilmez T, Payal AR, Gonzalez-Gonzalez LA, Chomsky AS, Vollman DE, Baze EF, Lawrence MG, Daly MK. Outcomes after cataract surgery in eyes with pseudoexfoliation: Results from the Veterans Affairs Ophthalmic Surgery Outcomes Data Project. Can J Ophthalmol 2017;52(1):61-68.Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare clinical outcomes of cataract surgery in eyes with and without pseudoexfoliation (PXF). DESIGN: Retrospective deidentified data analysis. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 123 PXF and 4776 non-PXF eyes of patients who underwent cataract surgery. METHODS: We compared data on visual acuity, Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ)-based quality of life, and complications in PXF and non-PXF eyes from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Ophthalmic Surgery Outcomes Data Project across 5 VA medical centres. RESULTS: Pupillary expansion devices were used in 31 (25.2%) PXF cases and 398 (8.4%) non-PXF cases (p < 0.0001). Capsular tension rings were used in 6 (4.9%) PXF cases and 55 (1.2%) non-PXF cases (p < 0.004). The following complications occurred more frequently in PXF cases: zonular dehiscence without vitrectomy (4 [3.3%] PXF cases vs 40 [0.8%] non-PXF cases p = 0.02), persistent inflammation (28 [24.1%] vs 668 [14.5%]; p = 0.007), and persistent intraocular pressure elevation (5 [4.3%] vs 68 [1.5%]; p = 0.03). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) improved in both groups after 1 month, but 87 (83.7%) PXF cases achieved postoperative BCVA better than or equal to 20/40 compared to 3991 (93.8%) non-PXF cases (p = 0.0003). There was no significant difference in the postoperative composite VFQ scores between PXF (82.1 ± 16.9) and non-PXF cases (84.2 ± 16.8, p = 0.09). CONCLUSIONS: Several complications occurred more frequently in the PXF group compared to the non-PXF group, and fewer PXF cases achieved BCVA better than or equal to 20/40. Despite this, both groups experienced similar improvement in vision-related quality of life after cataract surgery.

Nihalani BR, VanderVeen DK. Benchmarks for outcome indicators in pediatric cataract surgery. Eye (Lond) 2017;31(3):417-421.Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to establish benchmarks for outcome indicators that may help ascertain the quality of pediatric cataract surgery with primary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation.Patients and methodsA retrospective chart review of patients older than 2 years undergoing cataract surgery with primary IOL implantation, by multiple surgeons in a tertiary-care center, from November 2005 to February 2016 was conducted. Patients with ocular comorbidities that would affect the outcomes were excluded. The outcome measures chosen were as follows: (1) final best corrected Snellen visual acuity (BCVA) in patients who had bilateral cataract surgery analyzed at the last clinic visit; (2) prediction error (PE)=expected refraction-actual refraction. Mean PE and mean absolute PE were assessed 1 month postoperatively, irrespective of age or laterality.ResultsMean age at surgery was 8.3±4.6 years and mean follow-up duration was 3.7±2.7 years. The results of outcome measures were as follows: (1) BCVA was 20/40 or better in 96% (n=124 eyes, mean patient age: 8.3±4.6 years). Remaining five eyes had amblyopia with two eyes having BCVA worse than 20/100 that did not respond to amblyopia treatment. (2) Mean PE was 0.3±1.1 D and mean absolute PE was 0.9±0.7 D. PE was within ±0.5 D in 43.0%, ±1.0 D in 66%, and ±2.0 D in 95% (n=235 eyes).ConclusionGood visual acuity after cataract surgery should be expected for children with bilateral cataracts, setting a high benchmark similar to that recommended in adult cataract surgery. Prediction error is greater in pediatric eyes than in adult eyes, setting a lower benchmark. This study establishes benchmark for outcome indicators in pediatric patients older than 2 years undergoing cataract surgery with primary IOL implantation.

Finn AP, Borboli-Gerogiannis S, Brauner S, Peggy Chang H-Y, Chen S, Gardiner M, Greenstein SH, Kloek C, Miller JW, Chen TC. Assessing Resident Cataract Surgery Outcomes Using Medicare Physician Quality Reporting System Measures. J Surg Educ 2016;73(5):774-9.Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess resident cataract surgery outcomes at an academic teaching institution using 2 Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) cataract measures, which are intended to serve as a proxy for quality of surgical care. DESIGN: A retrospective review comparing cataract surgery outcomes of resident and attending surgeries using 2 PQRS measures: (1) 20/40 or better best-corrected visual acuity following cataract surgery and (2) complications within 30 days following cataract surgery requiring additional surgical procedures. SETTING: An academic ophthalmology center. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 2487 surgeries performed at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012 were included in this study. RESULTS: Of all 2487 cataract surgeries, 98.95% achieved a vision of at least 20/40 at or before 90 days, and only 0.64% required a return to the operating room for postoperative complications. Of resident surgeries, 98.9% (1370 of 1385) achieved 20/40 vision at or before 90 days follow-up. Of attending surgeries, 99.0% (1091 of 1102) achieved 20/40 vision at or before 90 days (p = 1.00). There were no statistically significant differences between resident and attending cases regarding postoperative complications needing a return to the operating room (i.e., 0.65%, or 9 of 1385 resident cases vs 0.64%, or 7 of 1102 attending cases; p = 1.00). CONCLUSIONS: Using PQRS Medicare cataract surgery criteria, this study establishes new benchmarks for cataract surgery outcomes at a teaching institution and supplemental measure for assessing resident surgical performance. Excellent cataract outcomes were achieved at an academic teaching institution, with results exceeding Medicare thresholds of 50%. There appears to be no significant difference in supervised trainee and attending cataract surgeon outcomes using 2 PQRS measures currently used by Medicare to determine physician reimbursement and quality of care.

Payal AR, Sola-Del Valle D, Gonzalez-Gonzalez LA, Cakiner-Egilmez T, Chomsky AS, Vollman DE, Baze EF, Lawrence M, Daly MK. American Society of Anesthesiologists classification in cataract surgery: Results from the Ophthalmic Surgery Outcomes Data Project. J Cataract Refract Surg 2016;42(7):972-82.Abstract

PURPOSE: To explore the association of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification with cataract surgery outcomes. SETTING: Five Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, United States. DESIGN: Retrospective observational cohort study. METHODS: The study analyzed the outcomes of cataract surgery cases. Corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), unanticipated events, and vision-related quality of life (VRQL) were assessed using the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ), comparing ASA classes I through IV. For some analyses, ASA classes I and II were designated as Group A and ASA classes III and IV were designated Group B. RESULTS: Of the 4923 cases, 875 (17.8%) were in Group A, 4032 (81.9%) were in Group B, and 16 (0.3%) had missing data. The mean CDVA and mean composite NEI-VFQ score improved after cataract surgery in both groups (P < .0001); however, Group A had a better mean postoperative CDVA and postoperative VFQ composite scores than Group B (P < .0001, both outcomes). A higher ASA class was associated with an increased risk for 2 unanticipated events; that is, clinically significant macular edema (CSME) (Group A: 4 [0.47%] versus Group B: 50 [1.28%]; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-13.05; P = 0.04) and readmission to the hospital within 30 days (2 [0.23%] versus 56 [1.41%]; OR, 8.26; 95% CI, 1.71-148.62; P = .004) CONCLUSIONS: Among United States veterans, the ASA classification could be an important predictor of VRQL and visual outcomes. In this cohort, it was associated with an increased risk for 2 serious unanticipated events-CSME and readmission to the hospital-both costly, unwanted outcomes. FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE: Dr. Vollman is a consultant to Forsight Vision5. None of the authors has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.

Kang JH, Wu J, Cho E, Ogata S, Jacques P, Taylor A, Chiu C-J, Wiggs JL, Seddon JM, Hankinson SE, Schaumberg DA, Pasquale LR. Contribution of the Nurses' Health Study to the Epidemiology of Cataract, Age-Related Macular Degeneration, and Glaucoma. Am J Public Health 2016;106(9):1684-9.Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) to understanding the genetic and lifestyle factors that influence the risk of cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. METHODS: We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS between 1976 and 2016. RESULTS: The NHS has helped to elucidate the roles of genetics, lifestyle factors (e.g., cigarette smoking associated with cataract extraction and age-related macular degeneration), medical conditions (e.g., diabetes associated with cataract extraction and glaucoma), and dietary factors (e.g., greater carotenoid intake and lower glycemic diet associated with lower risk of age-related macular degeneration) in the etiology of degree and progression of lens opacities, cataract extraction, age-related macular degeneration, primary open-angle glaucoma, and exfoliation glaucoma. CONCLUSIONS: The findings from the NHS, combined with those of other studies, have provided compelling evidence to support public health recommendations for helping to prevent age-related eye diseases: abstinence from cigarette smoking, maintenance of healthy weight and diabetes prevention, and a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables.

Wilson ME, O'Halloran H, VanderVeen D, Roarty J, Plager DA, Markwardt K, Gedif K, Lambert SR. Difluprednate versus prednisolone acetate for inflammation following cataract surgery in pediatric patients: a randomized safety and efficacy study. Eye (Lond) 2016;30(9):1187-94.Abstract

PurposeTo evaluate safety and efficacy of difluprednate 0.05% ophthalmic emulsion for treatment of postoperative inflammation after cataract surgery in pediatric patients.MethodsThis was a phase 3B, multicentre, randomized, double-masked, active-controlled study of patients aged 0-3 years who underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery in one eye, with/without intraocular lens implantation. Patients were randomized to receive difluprednate 0.05% four times daily or prednisolone acetate 1% for 14 days post surgery, followed by tapering for 14 days. Safety included evaluation of adverse events. Primary efficacy was the proportion of patients with an anterior cell grade of 0 (no cells) at day 14; secondary efficacy was a global inflammation score.ResultsForty patients were randomized to each treatment group. Adverse drug reactions included corneal oedema (difluprednate 0.5%, n=1; prednisolone acetate 1%, n=0) and increased intraocular pressure or ocular hypertension (n=2/group). Mean intraocular pressure values during treatment were 2-3 mm Hg higher with difluprednate 0.05% compared with prednisolone acetate 1%; mean values were similar between groups by the first week after treatment cessation. At 2 weeks post surgery, the incidence of complete clearing of anterior chamber cells was similar between groups (difluprednate 0.05%, n=30 (78.9%); prednisolone acetate 1%, n=31 (77.5%). Compared with prednisolone acetate 1%, approximately twice as many difluprednate 0.05%-treated patients had a global inflammation assessment score indicating no inflammation on day 1 (n=12 (30.8%) vs n=7 (17.5%) and day 8 (n=18 (48.7%) vs n=10 (25.0%).ConclusionsDifluprednate 0.05% four times daily showed safety and efficacy profiles similar to prednisolone acetate 1% four times daily in children 0-3 years undergoing cataract surgery.

Turalba A, Payal AR, Gonzalez-Gonzalez LA, Cakiner-Egilmez T, Chomsky AS, Vollman DE, Baze EF, Lawrence M, Daly MK. Cataract Surgery Outcomes in Glaucomatous Eyes: Results From the Veterans Affairs Ophthalmic Surgery Outcomes Data Project. Am J Ophthalmol 2015;160(4):693-701.e1.Abstract

PURPOSE: To compare visual acuity outcomes, vision-related quality of life, and complications related to cataract surgery in eyes with and without glaucoma. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. METHODS: Cataract surgery outcomes in cases with and without glaucoma from the Veterans Affairs Ophthalmic Surgical Outcomes Data Project were compared. RESULTS: We identified 608 glaucoma cases and 4306 controls undergoing planned cataract surgery alone. After adjusting for age, pseudoexfoliation, small pupil, prior ocular surgery, and anterior chamber depth, we found that glaucoma cases were more likely to have posterior capsular tear with vitrectomy (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, P = .03) and sulcus intraocular lens placement (OR 1.65, P = .03) during cataract surgery. Glaucoma cases were more likely to have postoperative inflammation (OR 1.73, P < .0001), prolonged elevated intraocular pressure (OR 2.96, P = .0003), and additional surgery within 30 days (OR 1.92, P = .03). Mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ) scores significantly improved after cataract surgery in both groups (P < .0001), but there were larger improvements in BCVA (P = .01) and VFQ composite scores (P < .0001) in the nonglaucoma vs the glaucoma group. A total of 3621 nonglaucoma cases (94.1%) had postoperative BCVA 20/40 or better, compared to 466 glaucoma cases (89.6%) (P = .0003). CONCLUSIONS: Eyes with glaucoma are at increased risk for complications and have more modest visual outcomes after cataract surgery compared to eyes without glaucoma. Despite this, glaucoma patients still experience significant improvement in vision-related outcomes after cataract extraction. Further study is needed to explore potential factors that influence cataract surgery outcomes in glaucomatous eyes.

Witkin AJ, Shah AR, Engstrom RE, Kron-Gray MM, Baumal CR, Johnson MW, Witkin DI, Leung J, Albini TA, Moshfeghi AA, Batlle IR, Sobrin L, Eliott D. Postoperative Hemorrhagic Occlusive Retinal Vasculitis: Expanding the Clinical Spectrum and Possible Association with Vancomycin. Ophthalmology 2015;122(7):1438-51.Abstract

PURPOSE: To describe a syndrome of hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis (HORV) that developed after seemingly uncomplicated cataract surgery. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. SUBJECTS: Eleven eyes of 6 patients from 6 different institutions. METHODS: Cases were identified after discussion among retina specialists. The findings on presentation, clinical course, and outcome of a series of 7 eyes of 4 patients were compared with a previous report of 4 eyes of 2 patients, and data from both series were combined for a comprehensive analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Historical data, examination findings, imaging results, systemic evaluation findings, treatment regimens, and visual outcomes. RESULTS: Eleven eyes of 6 patients underwent otherwise uncomplicated cataract surgery, receiving viscoelastic and prophylactic intracameral vancomycin during the procedure. Despite good initial vision on postoperative day 1, between 1 to 14 days after surgery, all eyes demonstrated painless vision loss resulting from HORV. Extensive ocular and systemic evaluations were unrevealing in all patients. All patients were treated with aggressive systemic and topical corticosteroids. Additional treatments included systemic antiviral medication in 4 patients, intravitreal antibiotics in 4 eyes, and pars plana vitrectomy in 4 eyes. Skin testing for vancomycin sensitivity showed negative results in 3 patients and was not performed in the others. Neovascular glaucoma developed in 7 eyes, and all eyes received intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injection, panretinal photocoagulation, or both for retinal ischemia. Final visual acuity was less than 20/100 in 8 of 11 eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative HORV is an exceedingly rare and potentially devastating condition that can occur after otherwise uncomplicated cataract surgery. Although the precise cause remains unknown, this disease may represent a delayed immune reaction similar to vancomycin-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Despite treatment with high-dose corticosteroids, antiviral medication, and early vitrectomy in many patients, visual outcomes typically were poor in this series. Early intervention with intravitreal anti-VEGF medication and panretinal photocoagulation may help to prevent additional vision loss resulting from neovascular glaucoma.