Oculoplastics

Oculoplastics Publications

Stagner AM, Jakobiec FA, Fay A. Primary orbital synovial sarcoma: A clinicopathologic review with a differential diagnosis and discussion of molecular genetics. Surv Ophthalmol 2017;62(2):227-236.Abstract

Synovial sarcoma is a soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities developing in young adults that has rarely been reported in the orbit. Synovial sarcoma is associated with a unique translocation, resulting in an SYT-SSX fusion gene. We analyze 7 published periocular cases, together with the current one, to gain a better appreciation of the features of the tumor in this location and to compare the findings with those derived from nonophthalmic studies. An inferior orbital mass developed in a 31-year-old woman after experiencing periorbital and hemifacial pain for more than a decade. Radiographically, the mass was circumscribed and displayed coarse internal calcifications. A large but subtotal excision with histopathologic examination disclosed a primitive tumor composed of spindled and ovoid cells. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positivity for nuclear transducin-like enhancer of split 1 and membranous CD99, typical for synovial sarcoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization identified a (X,18) translocation in the tumor cells. The patient underwent postoperative adjuvant proton beam radiotherapy with a good response that has been maintained during 1 year of follow-up. Orbital soft-tissue tumors of all types are increasingly identified by their distinctive genetic signatures that offer more specificity than standard immunohistochemical tests.

Syed ZA, Sutula FC. Dynamic Intraductal Meibomian Probing: A Modified Approach to the Treatment of Obstructive Meibomian Gland Dysfunction. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2017;Abstract

PURPOSE: Obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction is a leading cause of ocular morbidity and its treatment remains a challenge. Meibomian gland probing was initially described in 2010. Here, the authors describe a modified technique, dynamic intraductal meibomian probing, which offers several advantages over the traditional approach including increased magnification, greater eyelid stabilization, enhanced anesthesia, and easier identification of gland orifices through the expression of meibum. METHODS: The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of 70 eyelids with treatment-resistant obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction undergoing dynamic intraductal meibomian probing between January 2013 and April 2015. RESULTS: Immediately after the procedure, 91.4% of cases experienced symptomatic improvement, and no complications were noted. CONCLUSIONS: Dynamic intraductal meibomian probing is an effective and safe treatment for obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction that is resistant to traditional therapies.

Jakobiec FA, Zakka FR, Tu Y, Freitag SK. Dermatofibroma of the Eyelid: Immunohistochemical Diagnosis. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2017;Abstract

A 66-year-old man developed a painless 2 mm to 3 mm recurrent nodule at the left upper eyelid margin. Excision disclosed a spindle cell lesion without frank atypia or mitotic activity growing in a twisted fascicular pattern often referred to as storiform. All the surgical margins were involved with tumor. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that many of the constituent spindle and dendritic tumor cells were CD34, factor XIIIa, and CD 163, the latter 2 being biomarkers for monocytic lineage. The lesion was diagnosed as a dermatofibroma rather than a fibrous histiocytoma, a term that should be reserved for more aggressive lesions of deeper fascial planes. Facial dermatofibromas are rarer and more likely than those of the extremities to recur and therefore deserve wider local excision at first surgery with careful and frequent clinical follow ups. Eyelid dermatofibroma has probably often been misdiagnosed as another tumor in the past. Immunohistochemistry can supply valuable biomarker criteria for diagnosis.

Wolkow N, Jakobiec FA, Stagner AM, Cunnane ME, Piantadosi AL, Basgoz N, Lefebvre D. Chronic orbital and calvarial fungal infection with Apophysomyces variabilis in an immunocompetent patient. Surv Ophthalmol 2017;62(1):70-82.Abstract

Apophysomyces is a rare fungal organism causing rhino-orbito-cerebral mycotic infections with high morbidity and mortality, typically in immunocompetent individuals. Several cases of Apophysomyces elegans orbital disease have been reported. Herein, we report a case of Apophysomyces variabilis infection involving the orbit, sinuses, and calvarium in an immunocompetent 74-year-old woman, with a review of the literature. Unlike prior cases of A. elegans classic rhino-orbito-cerebral infection, our case included diffuse calvarial lytic lesions and overlying soft tissue nodules, but without parenchymal intracranial involvement. There was radiographic and clinical evidence of infarction of the orbital contents and cavernous sinus thrombosis. Anastomoses between the superior orbital (ophthalmic) vein and diploic veins of the calvarium are believed to be primarily responsible for the unusual mode of spread on the extradural surface of the brain. Although the patient stabilized without definitive surgical intervention, her disease slowly and intermittently progressed for over a year after presentation, requiring multiple courses of antifungal treatment.

Jakobiec FA, Zakka FR, Lorch A. Unsuspected Conjunctival Orbital Dermoid Cyst: Aids in Diagnosis. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2017;Abstract

A 25-year-old man with Type 1 diabetes mellitus experienced rapid visual decline and was scheduled for right cataract surgery. At the time of administering an inferotemporal retrobulbar block, a white discharge appeared spontaneously on the surface of the globe. Superotemporally a cyst was found and its contents were subtotally evacuated. Microscopically, eosinophilic, acellular material with chatter artifact and small vacuoles was detected and initially thought to represent a lens choristoma. This material stained moderately with the periodic acid Schiff method and was focally Congo red positive without apple green birefringence; it also stained blue with the Masson trichrome method. Acid-fast staining disclosed the presence of rare vellous hairs. Adherent cells were not epidermal cells (CK5/6) but conjunctival epithelial cells (CK7); CD68-positive histiocytes were also identified. The lesion was diagnosed as a disrupted orbital dermoid cyst of conjunctival origin.

Jakobiec FA, Qureshi S, Zakka FR, Tu Y, Lee NG. Eyelid Eccrine Cyst: An Exceptional Lesion Among Dominant Apocrine Cysts. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2017;Abstract

A 71-year-old woman developed a small bluish lesion beneath the cilia of the left lower eyelid. Excision and microscopic examination disclosed a cyst with an intimately associated eccrine sweat gland. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the cyst's epithelium was strongly CK5/6, CK14, CK7 weakly positive, and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 and smooth muscle actin negative. This is the first immunohistochemically proven eccrine cyst of the eyelid skin. Apocrine cysts develop only at the eyelid margin where the glands of Moll are located. They immunostain positively for cytoplasmic gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 in the adlumenal cells and smooth muscle actin in an outer myoepithelial (abluminal) layer.

Wu D, Qian T, Nakao T, Xu J, Liu Z, Sun X, Chu Y, Hong J. Medically uncontrolled conjunctival pyogenic granulomas: correlation between clinical characteristics and histological findings. Oncotarget 2017;8(2):2020-2024.Abstract

BACKGROUND: Conjunctival pyogenic granulomas are commonly seen after ocular surgeries or at an ocular wound site. The aim of this study is to describe a novel histological classification for medically uncontrolled conjunctival pyogenic granulomas (MUCPG), and to explore whether the diversity in clinical features correlates to different histological subtypes of MUCPG. METHODS: This is an observational cross-section case series. We reviewed 46 consecutive patients with conjunctival pyogenic granulomas who did not respond to topical corticosteroids and underwent surgical excision from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2015. Clinical features and histological findings were presented and analyzed. RESULTS: Ocular surgery, accidental injury, and chalazion were the main predisposing causes of MUCPG. The lesions tended to occur unilaterally on the bulbar conjunctiva. Forty patients (87%) presented an enrichment of inflammatory cells and proliferated capillaries in their pathological sections (inflammatory pattern). Six patients (13%) showed relatively few inflammatory cells and capillaries within fibrous stroma (fibrous pattern). Patients with the inflammatory pattern were older (p = 0.025) and tended to be located in bulbar conjunctiva (p = 0.002). The predisposing causes were also different between two histological subtypes (p = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: We found the correlation between clinical presentation and histological subtypes in patients with MUCPG, indicating this disease may need a new classification scheme.

Fay A, Dolman PJ. Diseases and Disorders of the Orbit and Ocular Adnexa, 1st Edition. 1st ed. Elsevier; 2016.Abstract

Drawing from the knowledge and expertise of more than 70 contributing international experts, Diseases and Disorders of the Orbit and Ocular Adnexa thoroughly covers the state of the art in orbital and periocular disease from the perspective of a variety of specialties. Clearly written and profusely illustrated, it covers the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, natural history, and management alternatives of disease processes affecting the orbit, eyelids, lacrimal system, and upper face. With a singular focus on the diagnosis and management of orbital and ocular adnexal disease, this authoritative text gives you the information you need to excel both in practice and on exams in the specialty of ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery.


Key Features

Offers an in-depth and thorough approach to the pathophysiology of oculoplastics and orbital disease, incorporating the perspectives of numerous specialties - all in one convenient volume.

  • Uses an easy-to-follow, templated format throughout so you can find what you need quickly.
  • Covers new information not included in other texts, such as antibody testing in dysthyroid conditions and a rapidly emerging array of targeted immunosuppressive medications for the treatment of inflammatory orbital disease.
  • Includes hot topics such as the classification and management of orbital inflammatory disease; vascular neoplasms and malformations; periocular dermatology; burn management; facial paralytic disease; and the pathogenesis, evaluation and management of lymphoproliferative disease.
  • Features more than 1,200 high-quality clinical, imaging, and histological illustrations that provide clear visual examples of orbital disease.
  • Written by an international team of experts from five continents (across multiple specialties including ophthalmology, dermatology, burn management, plastic surgery, otolaryngology, endocrinology, and pathology) led by Dr. Aaron Fay and Dr. Peter J. Dolman.
  • Expert Consult™ eBook version included with purchase. This enhanced eBook experience allows you to search all of the text, figures, and references from the book on a variety of devices.


Author Information
By Aaron Fay, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA and Peter J Dolman, MD, FRCSC , Clinical Professor, Division Head of Oculoplastics and Orbit; Director of Fellowship Programmes, Department of Ophthalmology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

 

Charles NC, Jakobiec FA, Patel P. Periorbital Dermoid Cyst With Unique Trichilemmal Differentiation. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2016;Abstract

The authors describe a 4-year-old girl presenting with a 2-year history of a superomedial eyelid "bump" that appeared cystic on MRI. The clinical diagnosis was dermoid cyst, possibly of conjunctival origin. Following excision, histology showed a cyst that contained keratin and lanugo hairs in its lumen with sebaceous glands and chronic inflammation in its fibrous wall. An unanticipated finding was the presence of a trichilemmal (pilar) variety of epithelial lining that stained positively for calretinin, an immunostain that identifies trichilemmal epithelium. To the authors' knowledge this is the first case of a dermoid cyst with trichilemmal lining. This study was conducted in compliance with the rules and regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and in conformity with the Oslo declaration.

Jakobiec FA, Tu Y, Zakka FR, Tong AKF. Dermatofibroma of the Eyelid with Monster Cells. Surv Ophthalmol 2016;Abstract

Dermatofibromas are most frequently encountered in women on the lower extremities, often after minor trauma. A 64-year-old woman developed a recurrent lesion of the right lower eyelid. It harbored "monster cells" that were large, with either multiple nuclei or a single, large, convoluted and hyperchromatic nucleus. The presence of these cells does not signify a malignant transformation. The background cells were either histiocytoid (many were adipophilin-positive), spindled cells, or dendritiform cells without mitoses. Factor XIIIa, CD68 and CD163 immunostaining was positive and a subpopulation of CD1a(+) Langerhans cells were intermixed. Facial and eyelid dermatofibromas are more likely to recur and deserve wider, tumor-free surgical margins. Their microscopic differential diagnosis includes a cellular scar, peripheral nerve tumor, atypical fibrous xanthoma and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans.

Homer N, Yoon MK. Evaluation of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) Fellowship Program Website Content and Quality. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2016;Abstract

PURPOSE: The qualities that applicants value in the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) fellowship programs have been studied, but the availability of this information on program websites has not yet been reviewed. The authors evaluated the availability of resident-valued ASOPRS fellowship program information on the Internet. METHODS: The authors performed an Internet search of the 53 ASOPRS fellowship program websites and evaluated websites for 20 characteristics of interest to ASOPRS fellowship applicants such as teaching faculty, program description, rotation schedule, operative cases, and interview information. RESULTS: Of the 53 ASOPRS fellowship programs, 43 (81.1%) had a fellowship program-dedicated website. The fellowship websites contained a mean 7.6 characteristics (38.1%, range 0-15). Faculty listing, program description, and case diversity were the most commonly included data (74.4%, 72.1%, and 69.8%, respectively). Fellow selection process, interview information, and graduate job placement were least commonly included (7.0%, 2.3%, and 0.0%, respectively). There was no significant difference in website inclusiveness based on fellowship region or faculty number. Programs affiliated with an ophthalmology residency were more complete than those that were not (40.3% vs. 20.0%, p = 0.0098). CONCLUSIONS: This review found that most programs had websites and contained a reasonable number of characteristics. However, applicant-valued information regarding surgical volume, procedure variety, application information, and postgraduate employment history were often missing. American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery fellowship programs may improve match outcomes by providing and enhancing program websites with details that their applicants seek.

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