Faculty

Researchers identify new target for abnormal blood vessel growth in the eyes

April 11, 2017

Regulating transcription factor RUNX1 using small molecule drugs a promising novel therapy for diseases of the retina, including advanced diabetic eye disease.

Boston, Mass.— A team led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers has identified a novel therapeutic target for retinal neovascularization, or abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina, a hallmark of advanced diabetic eye disease (proliferative diabetic retinopathy).... Read more about Researchers identify new target for abnormal blood vessel growth in the eyes

Jae-Hyun Jung, PhD, receives 2017 Alice J. Adler Fellowship

Jae-Hyun Jung, PhD, receives 2017 Alice J. Adler Fellowship

April 13, 2017

Jae-Hyun Jung, PhD, is the recipient of the 2017 Alice J. Adler Fellowship of the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass. Eye and Ear in the amount of $30,000 over one year for his project, “The best field expansion configuration for using multiplexing prism for homonymous hemianopia.” This award is part of the Eleanor and Miles Shore 50th Anniversary Fellowship Program for Scholars in Medicine.

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Joan W. Miller

Joan Miller, MD, appointed to AUPO Board of Trustees

April 12, 2017

Joan W. Miller, MD, has been appointed to the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology (AUPO) Board of Trustees. As Chair of Harvard Ophthalmology since 2003, Dr. Miller is committed driving innovation and quality in academic medicine, and strongly supports mentoring and developing individuals so that they may grow in their leadership positions. According to Dr. Miller, who has attended almost every AUPO meeting since becoming, “AUPO is one of the most...

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Growth factor shown to protect the retina in early stage diabetes

Growth factor shown to protect the retina in early stage diabetes

February 3, 2017

New research findings may lead to development of new therapies to delay or prevent the development of diabetic eye disease.

Boston, Mass. — Researchers from the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear have shown that a slight increase in transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), which is present in preclinical animal models with diabetic eye disease, protects retinal blood vessels from damage that commonly occurs in the early stages of the disease (known as diabetic retinopathy). Their findings, ...

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Congratulations to Our 2017 ARVO Fellows!

February 1, 2017

 

The title of ARVO Fellow is an honor established to recognize current ARVO members for their individual accomplishments, leadership and contributions to the Association. ARVO Fellows serve as role models and mentors for individuals pursuing careers in vision and ophthalmology research and help further ARVO's vision, which includes advancing basic and clinical knowledge and serving as the leading international forum for vision research and the primary advocate for vision science worldwide. In 2017, two HMS Ophthalmology faculty members, one former faculty member, and several...

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Ula Jurkunas

Ula V. Jurkunas, MD, to receive 2017 Carl Camras Translational Research Award

January 31, 2017

Boston, Mass. — Ula V. Jurkunas, MD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School, Associate Scientist at Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass. Eye and Ear, and a resident of Winchester, Mass., has been selected to receive a 2017 ARVO Foundation/Pfizer Ophthalmics Carl Camras Translational Research Award. Supported through a donation from Pfizer Ophthalmics, the award includes a $12,000 scholarship in support of Dr....

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Larry Benowitz, PhD

Zinc chelation: A better way to regenerate the optic nerve?

January 30, 2017

 

New research by Larry Benowitz, PhD, and colleagues shows how zinc regulates the survival of retinal ganglion cells, and by binding it (zinc chelation), can help the optic nerve to regenerate. Their findings, published in PNAS (January, 2017), could potentially lead to therapies that help patients with optic nerve injuries due to trauma, glaucoma or other causes, including spinal cord injury....

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Recent grants - January 2017

January 26, 2017

As part of the National Eye Institute Audacious Goals Initiative, the National Institutes of Health awarded $12.4 million to six research teams to identify biological factors that affect neural regeneration in the retina. Larry Benowitz, PhD, Boston Children’s Hospital, and colleagues at Stanford University and the Scripps Research Institute, received funding to support their research toward the molecular discovery of optic nerve injury. By...

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Researchers identify factors responsible for chronic nature of autoimmune disease

Researchers identify factors responsible for chronic nature of autoimmune disease

January 4, 2017

Boston, Mass. — Researchers from Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear have uncovered two factors responsible for the chronic, lifelong nature of autoimmune disorders, which tend to “flare up” intermittently in affected patients. These two factors are cell-signaling proteins called cytokines—specifically Interleukin-7 and -15 (IL-7 and IL-15)—that are secreted by cells of the immune system and help modulate memory Th17 cells, a subset of T cells which are known to contribute to autoimmune disorders. Until now, it was unclear how Th17 cells...

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Luk Vandenberghe

Luk H. Vandenberghe, PhD, receives RPB Nelson Trust Award for Retinitis Pigmentosa

December 21, 2016

Boston, Mass. — Luk H. Vandenberghe, PhD, Director of the Grousbeck Gene Therapy Center at Massachusetts Eye and Ear and an Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School, has been awarded a Nelson Trust Award for Retinitis Pigmentosa by Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB) in the amount of $100,000 over two years. The Nelson Trust Award was established to stimulate, strengthen and accelerate research to improve...

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New glasses may help minimize peripheral vision loss

New glasses may help minimize peripheral vision loss

December 19, 2016

Information for this release was provided by the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

Rockville, Md. — Vision scientists may have discovered how to reduce pedestrian collisions in crowded and chaotic open space environments like bus terminals, shopping malls and city plazas involving individuals with partial blindness. Researchers have determined from which direction collisions with partially blind pedestrians are most likely to originate. This understanding will guide the development of new glasses that expand the sight of a person...

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Mass. Eye and Ear opens multidisciplinary center for thyroid eye disease and orbital surgery

Mass. Eye and Ear opens multidisciplinary center for thyroid eye disease and orbital surgery

December 14, 2016

Boston, Mass. — Massachusetts Eye and Ear recently opened the Center for Thyroid Eye Disease and Orbital Surgery, a multidisciplinary initiative to address complex conditions affecting the eye sockets, including orbital tumors and thyroid eye disease. Led by world-renowned experts with...

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