December 2021

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Azad AD, Chandramohan A, Li AS, Rosenblatt TR, Reeves M-GR, Pasricha MV, Ludwig CA, Nguyen A, Winges KM, Wang SY, Pan CK, Moss HE, Do DV, Fountain TR, Kossler AL. Representation of Women in Ophthalmology Subspecialty Societies over 20 Years. Ophthalmology 2021;Abstract
The representation of women has increased over the last 20 years among ophthalmology subspecialty society new membership, award winners, and executive committee membership; however, proportional representation is still lacking at most benchmarks.
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Binenbaum G, Chang MY, Heidary G, Morrison DG, Trivedi RH, Galvin JA, Pineles SL. Botulinum Toxin Injection for the Treatment of Strabismus: A Report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2021;128(12):1766-1776.Abstract
PURPOSE: To review the available evidence comparing the effectiveness of extraocular muscle botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) injection with eye muscle surgery for restoring ocular alignment in children and adults with nonparalytic, nonrestrictive horizontal strabismus. METHODS: Literature searches in the PubMed Cochrane Library, and clinical trial databases with no date restrictions, but limited to articles published in English, were conducted last on January 10, 2021. The searches yielded 515 citations, 40 of which were reviewed in full text by the first author. Fourteen articles met the criteria for inclusion (randomized or nonrandomized comparative studies, or case series with a minimum 50 patients; evaluating extraocular muscle BTXA injection for initial or repeat treatment of horizontal, nonparalytic, nonrestrictive strabismus; with at least 6 months of follow-up) and were graded by a methodologist. RESULTS: The 14 included studies consisted of 2 randomized clinical trials, 3 nonrandomized comparative studies, and 9 case series. All 5 comparative studies were graded level II evidence, and the 9 case series were graded level III evidence. Successful motor outcomes after BTXA injection were relatively consistent across 4 of the 5 comparative studies at 60%, when adjustment was made for differential selection bias in 1 of the studies. In the 4 studies, successful motor outcomes after surgery ranged from 66% to 77% with a mean follow-up of 23 to 75 months, and the outcomes were not significantly different from those after BTXA injection. In the fifth level II study, success was significantly higher with BTXA injection than with surgery (94% vs. 72%). The level III BTXA case series demonstrated higher motor success rates of 87% to 89% when children were treated in 2 muscles at a time; rates were lower in adults treated with single-muscle BTXA injection. CONCLUSIONS: Extraocular muscle injection of BTXA achieves a high rate of successful motor alignment, comparable with that achieved after eye muscle surgery for nonparalytic, nonrestrictive horizontal strabismus. Good alignment may require multiple BTXA injections, and it is not yet clear whether sensory outcomes are equivalent for BTXA injections versus eye muscle surgery in young children.
Bouffard MA, M Mallery R, Liao YJ, Torun N. Variation in Evolving Optic Neuritis. J Neuroophthalmol 2021;41(4):476-479.Abstract
BACKGROUND: The typical natural history of optic neuritis is subjected to important exceptions. Recognition of these exceptions has led to valuable insights regarding specific etiologies of optic neuritis. Exceptions to the natural history of recovering optic neuritis are well-defined (e.g., chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy), but exceptions to the natural history of evolving optic neuritis are less so. METHODS: Medical records of patients illustrating an atypical course of evolving optic neuritis were reviewed in a retrospective manner. Each patient was treated by at least one of the authors. RESULTS: Four patients were identified who illustrated an atypical natural history of incipient optic neuritis. Diagnoses included idiopathic optic neuritis, seropositive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disease, anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody disease, and multiple sclerosis in 1 patient each. Features of interest included an atypical temporal relationship between development of pain and onset of clinical optic neuropathy, an unusually protracted duration of pain, and an unusually long duration of worsening optic neuropathy before stabilization. CONCLUSIONS: This case series illustrates the substantial clinical heterogeneity which may be observed in the evolution of optic neuritis. The temporal relationship between development of pain and onset of clinical optic neuropathy, the duration of pain, and duration of worsening optic neuropathy before stabilization are all subjected to significant variability. Although most patients with optic neuritis present with painful vision loss which progresses over 1 week or less, careful attention to the exceptions described herein may facilitate earlier recognition of diagnostically challenging cases.
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Chang MY, Morrison DG, Binenbaum G, Heidary G, Trivedi RH, Galvin JA, Pineles SL. Home- and Office-Based Vergence and Accommodative Therapies for Treatment of Convergence Insufficiency in Children and Young Adults: A Report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2021;128(12):1756-1765.Abstract
PURPOSE: To review home- and office-based vergence and accommodative therapies for treatment of convergence insufficiency (CI) in children and young adults up to 35 years of age. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted through October 2020 in the PubMed database for English-language studies. The combined searches yielded 359 abstracts, of which 37 were reviewed in full text. Twelve of these were considered appropriate for inclusion in this assessment and assigned a level of evidence rating by the panel methodologist. RESULTS: Of the 12 studies included in this assessment, 8 were graded as level I evidence, 2 were graded as level II evidence, and 2 were graded as level III evidence. Two of the level I studies included older teenagers and young adults; the remainder of the studies exclusively evaluated children. Two randomized controlled trials found that office-based vergence and accommodative therapies were effective in improving motor outcomes in children with symptomatic CI. However, the studies reported conflicting results on the efficacy of office-based therapy for treating symptoms of CI. Data were inconclusive regarding the effectiveness of home-based therapies (including pencil push-ups and home computer therapy) compared with home placebo. In young adults, office-based vergence and accommodative therapies were not superior to placebo in relieving symptoms of CI. CONCLUSIONS: Level I evidence suggests that office-based vergence and accommodative therapies improve motor outcomes in children with symptomatic CI, although data are inconsistent regarding symptomatic relief. Evidence is insufficient to determine whether home-based therapies are effective.
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Eleiwa TK, Gaier ED, Haseeb A, ElSheikh RH, Sallam AB, Elhusseiny AM. Adverse Ocular Events following COVID-19 Vaccination. Inflamm Res 2021;70(10-12):1005-1009.
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Finkelstein JB, Tremblay ES, Van Cain M, Farber-Chen A, Schumann C, Brown C, Shah AS, Rhodes ET. Pediatric Clinicians' Use of Telemedicine: Qualitative Interview Study. JMIR Hum Factors 2021;8(4):e29941.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Bedside manner describes how clinicians relate to patients in person. Telemedicine allows clinicians to connect virtually with patients using digital tools. Effective virtual communication or webside manner may require modifications to traditional bedside manner. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to understand the experiences of telemedicine providers with patient-to-provider virtual visits and communication with families at a single large-volume children's hospital to inform program development and training for future clinicians. METHODS: A total of 2 focus groups of pediatric clinicians (N=11) performing virtual visits before the COVID-19 pandemic, with a range of experiences and specialties, were engaged to discuss experiential, implementation, and practice-related issues. Focus groups were facilitated using a semistructured guide covering general experience, preparedness, rapport strategies, and suggestions. Sessions were digitally recorded, and the corresponding transcripts were reviewed for data analysis. The transcripts were coded based on the identified main themes and subthemes. On the basis of a higher-level analysis of these codes, the study authors generated a final set of key themes to describe the collected data. RESULTS: Theme consistency was identified across diverse participants, although individual clinician experiences were influenced by their specialties and practices. A total of 3 key themes emerged regarding the development of best practices, barriers to scalability, and establishing patient rapport. Issues and concerns related to privacy were salient across all themes. Clinicians felt that telemedicine required new skills for patient interaction, and not all were comfortable with their training. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine provides benefits as well as challenges to health care delivery. In interprofessional focus groups, pediatric clinicians emphasized the importance of considering safety and privacy to promote rapport and webside manner when conducting virtual visits. The inclusion of webside manner instructions within training curricula is crucial as telemedicine becomes an established modality for providing health care.
Franco J, Lee NG. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis presenting as recurrent, multifocal orbital myositis. Orbit 2021;40(6):529-531.Abstract
A 43-year-old woman was referred with a 10 month history of persistent pain in the left orbit. Two years prior, she experienced similar pain in the right orbit. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time revealed an enlarged right medial rectus muscle. She was diagnosed with idiopathic orbital myositis and was successfully treated with oral corticosteroids. A year later, she developed symptoms in the left orbit with similar imaging findings. For ten months, she remained on high dose corticosteroids for presumed left medial rectus myositis before presenting to our service. Computed tomography (CT) imaging after corticosteroid taper revealed enlarged left medial rectus and left lateral rectus muscles. Orbital biopsy established a diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), for which she was successfully treated with rituximab. This case underscores the importance of not only proceeding with biopsy in atypical cases of orbital myositis but to also taper steroids prior to biopsy.
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Genadry KC, Shrock C, O'Shea D, Vatsa R, Shah AS, Gise R, Lipsett SC. Traumatic Hyphema. J Emerg Med 2021;61(6):740-741.
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Habib LA, Yoon MK. Patient specific implants in orbital reconstruction: A pilot study. Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2021;24:101222.Abstract
Purpose: Successful repair of the orbital skeleton restores function and cosmesis by normalizing globe position and allowing full motility of the extraocular muscles. Routine repairs are successful with standard implants. However, defects that are irregular or cause volume deficiency can be challenging to repair. The development of patient specific implants (PSI) offers an additional tool in complex cases. Herein, we report our experience using PSI for orbital reconstruction. Methods: An IRB-approved review was conducted of consecutive patients who received PSI from 8/2016-9/2018. Demographic and examination findings were recorded. PSI was designed using high-density porous polyethylene or polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and implanted for repair. The postoperative course was reviewed for outcomes and complications. Results: Eight patients were identified. Two had silent sinus syndrome, 3 were complex facial fracture revisions, and 3 were post-oncologic reconstruction. Seven received porous polyethylene implants, and 1 had a PEEK implant. Mean follow up time was 10.2 months (3.3-28.3). All had an improved functional and aesthetic result. Diplopia and enophthalmos completely resolved in 60% of fracture and silent sinus patients. All fracture and silent sinus patients were orthotropic without diplopia in primary gaze at last follow up. Tumor patients had improvement in symmetry and functionality. There were no complications. Conclusion and importance: Complex orbital skeleton derangements can be difficult to repair and standard implants may incompletely resolve the anatomic problem. In challenging cases, PSI may better achieve an aesthetically and anatomically successful outcome and improve functionality.
Halawa OA, Zebardast N, Kolli A, Foster PJ, He M, Aung T, Friedman DS. Population-Based Utility of van Herick Grading for Angle-Closure Detection. Ophthalmology 2021;128(12):1779-1782.
Hanumunthadu D, Lescrauwaet B, Jaffe M, Sadda SV, Wiecek E, Hubschman JP, Patel PJ. Clinical Update on Metamorphopsia: Epidemiology, Diagnosis and Imaging. Curr Eye Res 2021;46(12):1777-1791.Abstract
Purpose: To discuss the pathophysiology of metamorphopsia, its characterisation using retinal imaging and methods of assessment of patient symptoms and visual function.Methods: A literature search of electronic databases was performedResults: Metamorphopsia has commonly been associated with vitreomacular interface disorders (such as epiretinal membrane) and has also regularly been noted in diseases of the retina and choroid, particularly age-related macular degeneration and central serous chorioretinopathy. Developments in optical coherence tomography retinal imaging have enabled improved imaging of the foveal microstructure and have led to the localisation of the pathophysiology of metamorphopsia within the retinal layers of the macula. Alteration of alignment of inner and outer retinal layers at various retinal loci has been identified using multimodal imaging in patients with metamorphopsia in a range of conditions. Although the Amsler Grid assessment of metamorphopsia is a useful clinical indicator, new emerging methods of metamorphopsia assessment with psychophysical tests such as M-CHARTS and preferential hyperacuity perimetry, have been developed.Conclusions: It appears that there is a complex relationship between visual acuity and metamorphopsia symptoms that vary between retinal conditions. Although metamorphopsia has traditionally been challenging to measure in the clinic, advances in technology promise more robust, easy-to-use tests. It is possible that home assessment of metamorphopsia, particularly in conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, may help to guide the need for further clinic evaluation and consideration of treatment.
Hennein L, Robbins SL. Thyroid-Associated Orbitopathy: Management and Treatment. J Binocul Vis Ocul Motil 2021;:1-15.Abstract
Thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO) is a leading cause of orbital and strabismus symptoms in adults. Over the last decade, new treatments have greatly changed available options to alleviate symptoms and improve outcomes. This article discusses the pathophysiology and natural disease course of TAO, including when to pursue urgent treatment and when to consider other diagnoses. This article highlights the interventions that may alter the disease course and offers a comprehensive review on evidence-based interventions for both supportive therapy and systemic agents. The surgical strategies and principles for the treatment of TAO are discussed, including indications for combined surgical interventions and varying surgical techniques.
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Inomata T, Nakamura M, Sung J, Midorikawa-Inomata A, Iwagami M, Fujio K, Akasaki Y, Okumura Y, Fujimoto K, Eguchi A, Miura M, Nagino K, Shokirova H, Zhu J, Kuwahara M, Hirosawa K, Dana R, Murakami A. Smartphone-based digital phenotyping for dry eye toward P4 medicine: a crowdsourced cross-sectional study. NPJ Digit Med 2021;4(1):171.Abstract
Multidimensional integrative data analysis of digital phenotyping is crucial for elucidating the pathologies of multifactorial and heterogeneous diseases, such as the dry eye (DE). This crowdsourced cross-sectional study explored a novel smartphone-based digital phenotyping strategy to stratify and visualize the heterogenous DE symptoms into distinct subgroups. Multidimensional integrative data were collected from 3,593 participants between November 2016 and September 2019. Dimension reduction via Uniform Manifold Approximation and Projection stratified the collected data into seven clusters of symptomatic DE. Symptom profiles and risk factors in each cluster were identified by hierarchical heatmaps and multivariate logistic regressions. Stratified DE subgroups were visualized by chord diagrams, co-occurrence networks, and Circos plot analyses to improve interpretability. Maximum blink interval was reduced in clusters 1, 2, and 5 compared to non-symptomatic DE. Clusters 1 and 5 had severe DE symptoms. A data-driven multidimensional analysis with digital phenotyping may establish predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory medicine.
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Joseph S, Varadaraj V, Dave SR, Lage E, Lim D, Aziz K, Dudgeon S, Ravilla TD, Friedman DS. Investigation of the Accuracy of a Low-Cost, Portable Autorefractor to Provide Well-Tolerated Eyeglass Prescriptions: A Randomized Crossover Trial. Ophthalmology 2021;128(12):1672-1680.Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare patient preferences for eyeglasses prescribed using a low-cost, portable wavefront autorefractor versus standard subjective refraction (SR). DESIGN: Randomized, cross-over clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Patients aged 18 to 40 years presenting with refractive errors (REs) to a tertiary eye hospital in Southern India. METHODS: Participants underwent SR followed by autorefraction (AR) using the monocular version of the QuickSee device (PlenOptika Inc). An independent optician, masked to the refraction approach, prepared eyeglasses based on each refraction approach. Participants (masked to refraction source) were randomly assigned to use SR- or AR-based eyeglasses first, followed by the other pair, for 1 week each. At the end of each week, participants had their vision checked and were interviewed about their experience with the eyeglasses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients preferring eyeglasses were chosen using AR and SR. RESULTS: The 400 participants enrolled between March 26, 2018, and August 2, 2019, had a mean (standard deviation) age of 28.4 (6.6) years, and 68.8% were women. There was a strong correlation between spherical equivalents using SR and AR (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) with a mean difference of -0.07 diopters (D) (95% limits of agreement [LoA], -0.68 to 0.83). Of the 301 patients (75.2%) who completed both follow-up visits, 50.5% (n = 152) and 49.5% (n = 149) preferred glasses prescribed using SR and AR, respectively (95% CI, 45.7-56.3; P = 0.86). There were no differences in demographic or vision characteristics between participants with different preferences (P > 0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS: We observed a strong agreement between the prescriptions from SR and AR, and eyeglasses prescribed using SR and AR were equally preferred by patients. Wider use of prescribing based on AR alone in resource-limited settings is supported by these findings.
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Lains I, Diaz JD, Gittinger JW, Gaier ED. Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Secondary to Carotid Artery Dissection. J Neuroophthalmol 2021;41(4):e731-e733.
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Ma KK, Robson CD, Gaier ED, Gise R. Reversal of Visual Loss From Skull Base Osteomyelitis in a Pediatric Patient. J Neuroophthalmol 2021;41(4):e728-e730.
Maguire MG, Liu D, Bressler SB, Friedman SM, Melia M, Stockdale CR, Glassman AR, Sun JK, Sun JK. Lapses in Care Among Patients Assigned to Ranibizumab for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy: A Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Ophthalmol 2021;139(12):1266-1273.Abstract
Importance: The follow-up schedule for individuals with eyes treated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) requires that patients return frequently for monitoring and repeated treatment. The likelihood that a patient will comply should be a consideration in choosing a treatment approach. Objective: To describe completion of scheduled examinations among participants assigned to intravitreous injections of ranibizumab for PDR in a multicenter randomized clinical trial. Design, Setting, and Participants: This post hoc analysis evaluates data from a randomized clinical trial conducted at 55 US sites among 305 adults with proliferative diabetic retinopathy enrolled between February and December 2012. Both eyes were enrolled for 89 participants (1 eye to each study group), with a total of 394 study eyes. The final 2-year visit was completed in January 2015. Data were analyzed from April 2019 to July 2021. Interventions: Ranibizumab injections for PDR or macular edema. Main Outcomes and Measures: A long lapse in care of 8 or more weeks past a scheduled examination, dropout from follow-up, visual acuity at 5 years. Results: Among 170 participants, the median age was 51 years, and 44.7% were female. Through 5 years of follow-up, 94 of 170 participants (55.3%) had 1 or more long lapse in care. Median time to the first long lapse was 210 weeks, and 69 of 94 participants (73.4%) returned for examination after the first long lapse. Fifty of 170 participants (29.4%) dropped out of follow-up by 5 years. Among the 120 participants who completed the 5-year examination, median change from baseline in visual acuity was -2 letters for participants who had 1 or more long lapse compared with +5 letters for those without a long lapse (P = .02). After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratio (95% CI) for baseline associations with 1 or more long lapse was 1.21 (1.03-1.43) for each 5-letter decrement in visual acuity score, 2.19 (1.09-4.38) for neovascularization of the disc and elsewhere, and 3.48 (1.38-8.78) for no prior laser treatment for diabetic macular edema. Conclusions and Relevance: Over 5 years, approximately half of the participants assigned to ranibizumab for PDR had a long lapse in care despite substantial effort by the DRCR Retina Network to facilitate timely completion of examinations. The likelihood of a long lapse in care during long-term follow-up needs to be considered when choosing treatment for PDR. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01489189.
Marsiglia M, Chwalisz BK, Maher M. Neuroradiologic Imaging of Neurologic and Neuro-Ophthalmic Complications of Coronavirus-19 Infection. J Neuroophthalmol 2021;41(4):452-460.Abstract
BACKGROUND: To review the literature and provide a summary of COVID-19-related neurologic and neuro-ophthalmic complications. METHODS: The currently available literature was reviewed on PubMed and Google Scholar using the following keywords for searches: CNS, Neuro-Ophthalmology, COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, coronavirus, optic neuritis, pseudotumor cerebri, Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), meningitis, encephalitis, acute necrotizing hemorrhagic encephalopathy, and Guillain-Barré and Miller Fisher syndromes. RESULTS: Neuroradiologic findings of neurologic and neuro-ophthalmologic complications in relationship to COVID-19 infection were reviewed. Afferent visual pathway-related disorders with relevant imaging manifestations included fundus nodules on MRI, papilledema and pseudotumor cerebri syndrome, optic neuritis, Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis, vascular injury with thromboembolism and infarct, leukoencephalopathy, gray matter hypoxic injury, hemorrhage, infectious meningitis/encephalitis, acute necrotizing hemorrhagic encephalopathy, and PRES. Efferent visual pathway-related complications with relevant imaging manifestations were also reviewed, including orbital abnormalities, cranial neuropathy, Guillain-Barré and Miller Fisher syndromes, and nystagmus and other eye movement abnormalities related to rhombencephalitis. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 can cause central and peripheral nervous system disease, including along both the afferent and efferent components of visual axis. Manifestations of disease and long-term sequela continue to be studied and described. Familiarity with the wide variety of neurologic, ophthalmic, and neuroradiologic presentations can promote prompt and appropriate treatment and continue building a framework to understand the underlying mechanism of disease.
Moos WH, Faller DV, Glavas IP, Harpp DN, Kamperi N, Kanara I, Kodukula K, Mavrakis AN, Pernokas J, Pernokas M, Pinkert CA, Powers WR, Steliou K, Tamvakopoulos C, Vavvas DG, Zamboni RJ, Sampani K. Pathogenic mitochondrial dysfunction and metabolic abnormalities. Biochem Pharmacol 2021;193:114809.Abstract
Herein we trace links between biochemical pathways, pathogenesis, and metabolic diseases to set the stage for new therapeutic advances. Cellular and acellular microorganisms including bacteria and viruses are primary pathogenic drivers that cause disease. Missing from this statement are subcellular compartments, importantly mitochondria, which can be pathogenic by themselves, also serving as key metabolic disease intermediaries. The breakdown of food molecules provides chemical energy to power cellular processes, with mitochondria as powerhouses and ATP as the principal energy carrying molecule. Most animal cell ATP is produced by mitochondrial synthase; its central role in metabolism has been known for >80 years. Metabolic disorders involving many organ systems are prevalent in all age groups. Progressive pathogenic mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of genetic mitochondrial diseases, the most common phenotypic expression of inherited metabolic disorders. Confluent genetic, metabolic, and mitochondrial axes surface in diabetes, heart failure, neurodegenerative disease, and even in the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.
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Parekh M, Nathawat R, Parihar JKS, Jhanji V, Sharma N. Impact of COVID-19 restrictions on corneal tissue donation and utilization rate - Time to bring reforms?. Indian J Ophthalmol 2021;69(12):3782-3784.

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