January 2017

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Lambiase A, Sullivan BD, Schmidt TA, Sullivan DA, Jay GD, Truitt ER, Bruscolini A, Sacchetti M, Mantelli F. A Two-Week, Randomized, Double-masked Study to Evaluate Safety and Efficacy of Lubricin (150 μg/mL) Eye Drops Versus Sodium Hyaluronate (HA) 0.18% Eye Drops (Vismed®) in Patients with Moderate Dry Eye Disease. Ocul Surf 2017;15(1):77-87.Abstract

PURPOSE: The objective of this clinical trial (NCT02507934) was to assess the efficacy and safety of recombinant human lubricin as compared to a 0.18% sodium hyaluronate (HA) eye drop in subjects with moderate dry eye disease (DED). METHODS: DEWS Grade 2-3 subjects were randomized to use lubricin (N=19, 51.9 ± 11.8 years) or HA (N=20, 61.8 ± 13.3 years). After a saline washout period, subjects administered BID therapy for 7 days, followed by instillation as needed (2-6 drops per eye) for 7 days. Visual analog scale (VAS) including foreign body sensation, burning/stinging, itching, pain, sticky feeling, blurred vision and photophobia were primary outcomes, with secondary endpoints of corneal fluorescein staining, Schirmer test, tear film breakup time (TFBUT), eyelid and conjunctival erythema and number of instillations compared at day 14. RESULTS: The primary endpoint was met. Lubricin supplementation achieved greater than a 72% reduction from baseline in foreign body sensation (P<.013), burning/stinging, pain, sticky feeling (P<.0432), blurred vision (P<.0013), and photophobia (P<.011) in at least one eye. Lubricin also showed significant improvement in fluorescein staining (OD/OS: 43.8%/50.0%, vs. 26.5%/23.3%, P<.0398, P<.0232), TFBUT (P<.010), SANDE frequency (P<.0435), eyelid erythema (P<.004), conjunctival erythema (P<.0013), and instillations (P<.04) as compared to HA. No treatment-related adverse events occurred during the investigation. CONCLUSIONS: Recombinant human lubricin was shown to produce significant improvement in both signs and symptoms of dry eye disease as compared to HA.

Lee R, Khoueir Z, Tsikata E, Chodosh J, Dohlman CH, Chen TC. Long-term Visual Outcomes and Complications of Boston Keratoprosthesis Type II Implantation. Ophthalmology 2017;124(1):27-35.Abstract

PURPOSE: To report the long-term visual outcomes and complications after Boston keratoprosthesis type II implantation in the largest single-center case series with the longest average follow-up. DESIGN: Retrospective review of consecutive clinical case series. PARTICIPANTS: Between January 1992 and April 2015 at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 48 eyes of 44 patients had keratoprosthesis type II implanted by 2 surgeons (C.H.D. and J.C.). METHODS: For each eye, data were collected and analyzed on the preoperative characteristics, intraoperative procedures, and postoperative course. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Visual acuity outcomes, postoperative complications, and device retention. RESULTS: The most common indications for surgery were Stevens-Johnson syndrome in 41.7% (20 of 48 eyes) and mucous membrane pemphigoid in 41.7% (20 of 48 eyes). Mean follow-up duration was 70.2 months (standard deviation, 61.8 months; median, 52 months; range, 6 months to 19.8 years). Almost all patients (95.8%, 46 of 48 eyes) had a preoperative visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. Postoperative visual acuity improved to 20/200 or better in 37.5% (18 of 48 eyes) and to 20/100 or better in 33.3% (16 of 48 eyes) at the last follow-up visit. The most common postoperative complication was retroprosthetic membrane formation in over half (60.4%, 29 of 48 eyes). The most pressing postoperative complication was glaucoma onset or progression in about a third. Preexisting glaucoma was present in 72.9% (35 of 48 eyes). Glaucoma progressed in 27.1% (13 of 48 eyes) and was newly diagnosed in 8.3% (4 of 48 eyes) after surgery. Other postoperative complications were tarsorrhaphy revision in 52.1% (25 of 48 eyes), retinal detachment in 18.8% (9 of 48 eyes), infectious endophthalmitis in 6.3% (3 of 48 eyes), and choroidal detachment or hemorrhage in 8.3% (4 of 48 eyes). Half of eyes retained their initial keratoprosthesis at the last follow-up (50.0%, 24 of 48 eyes). CONCLUSIONS: The Boston keratoprosthesis type II is a viable option to salvage vision in patients with poor prognosis for other corneal procedures. Retroprosthetic membranes, keratoprosthesis retention, and glaucoma are major challenges in the postoperative period; however, the keratoprosthesis can still provide improved vision in a select group of patients.

Li Y, Andereggen L, Yuki K, Omura K, Yin Y, Gilbert H-Y, Erdogan B, Asdourian MS, Shrock C, de Lima S, Apfel U-P, Zhuo Y, Hershfinkel M, Lippard SJ, Rosenberg PA, Benowitz L. Mobile zinc increases rapidly in the retina after optic nerve injury and regulates ganglion cell survival and optic nerve regeneration. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2017;114(2):E209-E218.Abstract

Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the projection neurons of the eye, cannot regenerate their axons once the optic nerve has been injured and soon begin to die. Whereas RGC death and regenerative failure are widely viewed as being cell-autonomous or influenced by various types of glia, we report here that the dysregulation of mobile zinc (Zn(2+)) in retinal interneurons is a primary factor. Within an hour after the optic nerve is injured, Zn(2+) increases several-fold in retinal amacrine cell processes and continues to rise over the first day, then transfers slowly to RGCs via vesicular release. Zn(2+) accumulation in amacrine cell processes involves the Zn(2+) transporter protein ZnT-3, and deletion of slc30a3, the gene encoding ZnT-3, promotes RGC survival and axon regeneration. Intravitreal injection of Zn(2+) chelators enables many RGCs to survive for months after nerve injury and regenerate axons, and enhances the prosurvival and regenerative effects of deleting the gene for phosphatase and tensin homolog (pten). Importantly, the therapeutic window for Zn(2+) chelation extends for several days after nerve injury. These results show that retinal Zn(2+) dysregulation is a major factor limiting the survival and regenerative capacity of injured RGCs, and point to Zn(2+) chelation as a strategy to promote long-term RGC protection and enhance axon regeneration.

Liu S, Veldman P. Evidence-Based Endothelial Rehabilitation. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):96-103.Abstract

Endothelial keratoplasty (EK) has replaced penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) as the preferred surgical therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction. However, recent nationwide corneal graft registry data showed few advantages to EK relative to PKP with respect to graft survival and visual outcomes. This article compares the published outcomes and complications of EK to those of PKP. EK demonstrates superior spectacle corrected visual outcomes, fast recovery, less graft rejection, and higher patient satisfaction, particularly in studies performed by high-volume surgeons/centers. Endothelial cell loss in EK, while higher at early time points, was equivalent or superior at five-years' follow-up and graft survival was equivalent to or superior to PKP in these centers/studies. Continued standardization and simplification of EK procedures may allow surgeons who perform a lower volume of EK to achieve results that mirror those of high-volume centers/surgeons and close the potential gap in outcomes demonstrated in the registry data.

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Palioura S, Colby K. Outcomes of Descemet Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty Using Eye Bank-Prepared Preloaded Grafts. Cornea 2017;36(1):21-25.Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility of Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty using grafts preloaded by an eye bank in a commercially available insertion device. METHODS: In this retrospective case series, a series of 35 eyes in 34 consecutive patients who underwent Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty for Fuchs endothelial dystrophy or previously failed full-thickness grafts at a single tertiary care center from March 2013 to March 2014 was included. The donor tissue had undergone pre-lamellar dissection, trephination, and loading into EndoGlide Ultrathin inserters at the Lions Eye Institute for Transplant and Research (Tampa, FL) and was shipped overnight in Optisol GS to the surgeon (K.C.). Surgery was performed within 24 hours from tissue preparation and loading by the eye bank. Donor and recipient characteristics, endothelial cell density (ECD), best-corrected visual acuity, and central corneal thickness were recorded. The main outcome measures were intraoperative and postoperative complications and ECD loss at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: One primary graft failure (2.8%), 2 rebubblings (5.7%), and 1 graft rejection (2.8%) occurred. Mean preoperative donor ECD was 2821 ± 199 cells/mm. Six months postoperatively, the mean endothelial cell loss was 25.3% ± 17.2% (n = 32), which remained stable at 1 year (31.5% ± 17.9%, n = 32). Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 20/100 preoperatively to 20/25 at a mean follow-up of 1 year (n = 32). Mean central corneal thickness was reduced from 711 ± 110 μm to 638 ± 66 μm at the last follow-up visit. CONCLUSIONS: Donor graft tissue preloaded by an eye bank can be used successfully for endothelial keratoplasty. Preloading reduces intraoperative tissue manipulation.

Pasovic L, Eidet JR, Olstad OK, Chen DF, Lyberg T, Utheim TP. Impact of Storage Temperature on the Expression of Cell Survival Genes in Cultured ARPE-19 Cells. Curr Eye Res 2017;42(1):134-144.Abstract

PURPOSE: The development of a suitable storage method for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is necessary in the establishment of future RPE replacement therapy, and storage temperature has proven to be pivotal for cell survival. ARPE-19, a widely used model for RPE, has been shown to yield the greatest number of viable cells when stored at 16°C compared to other storage temperatures. In this study, we analyze the gene expression profile of cultured ARPE-19 cells after seven days of storage at different temperatures in an effort to predict the gene-level consequences of storage of RPE transplants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ARPE-19 cells were cultured until confluence and then stored in minimum essential medium at 4°C, 16°C, and 37°C for seven days. The total RNA was isolated and the gene expression profile was determined using DNA microarrays. The Results were validated using qPCR. RESULTS: Principal component and hierarchical clustering analyses show that the gene expression profiles of cell cultures stored at different temperatures cluster into separate groups. Cultures stored at 4°C cluster closest to the control cultures that were not stored and display the least change in gene expression after storage (157 differentially expressed genes). Cultures stored at 16°C and 37°C display a much larger change in differential gene expression (1787 and 1357 differentially expressed genes, respectively). At 16°C, the expression of several genes with proposed tumor suppressor functions was markedly increased. Changes in regulation of several known signaling pathways and of oxidative stress markers were discovered at both 16°C and 37°C, and activation of the angiogenesis marker vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was discovered at 37°C. There was no evidence of the activation of inflammatory processes in stored cell cultures. CONCLUSION: ARPE-19 cultures stored at 16°C show the greatest propensity to modulate their gene expression profile in a manner that supports cell survival during storage.

Phadikar P, Saxena S, Ruia S, Lai TYY, Meyer CH, Eliott D. The potential of spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging based retinal biomarkers. Int J Retina Vitreous 2017;3:1.Abstract

BACKGROUND: Biomarker", a merged word of "biological marker", refers to a broad subcategory of medical signs that objectively indicate the state of health, and well-being of an individual. Biomarkers hold great promise for personalized medicine as information gained from diagnostic or progression markers can be used to tailor treatment to the individual for highly effective intervention in the disease process. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proved useful in identifying various biomarkers in ocular and systemic diseases. MAIN BODY: Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging-based biomarkers provide a valuable tool for detecting the earlier stages of the disease, tracking progression, and monitoring treatment response. The aim of this review article is to analyze various OCT based imaging biomarkers and their potential to be considered as surrogate endpoints for diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and vitreomacular interface disorder. These OCT based surrogate markers have been classified as retinal structural alterations (macular central subfield thickness and cube average thickness); retinal ultrastructural alterations (disruption of external limiting membrane and ellipsoid zone, thinning of retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell layer); intraretinal microangiopathic changes; choroidal surrogate endpoints; and vitreoretinal interface endpoints. CONCLUSION: OCT technology is changing very quickly and throughout this review there are some of the multiple possibilities that OCT based imaging biomarkers will be more useful in the near future for diagnosis, prognosticating disease progression and as endpoint in clinical trials.

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Rami HE, Barham R, Sun JK, Silva PS. Evidence-Based Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):67-74.Abstract

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most frequent microvascular complication from diabetes and requires annual screening and at least annual follow-up. A systemic approach to optimize blood glucose and blood pressure may halt progression to severe stages of DR and obviate the need for ocular treatment. Although there is evidence of benefit from fenofibrate or intravitreous antiVEGF treatment for eyes with nonproliferative DR (NPDR), these therapies are not standard care for NPDR at this time. Some patients with severe NPDR, especially those with type 2 diabetes, benefit from early panretinal photocoagulation (PRP). Once DR progresses to proliferative DR (PDR), treatment is often necessary to prevent visual loss. PRP remains mainstay treatment for PDR with high-risk characteristics. However, intravitreous antiVEGF injections appear to be a safe and effective treatment alternative for PDR through at least two years. Vitreoretinal surgery is indicated for PDR cases with non-clearing vitreous hemorrhage and/or tractional retinal detachment.

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Shaikh M, Miller JB, Papakostas TD, Husain D. The Efficacy and Safety Profile of Ocriplasmin in Vitreomacular Interface Disorders. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):52-55.Abstract

Vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) describes the adhesion of the posterior hyaloid face to the inner retina in any part of the macula. This can arise after incomplete separation of the posterior vitreous cortex from the macula during vitreous liquefaction. While the VMA may resolve spontaneously, a strong and persistent adhesion can lead to a variety of anatomical changes, including vitreomacular traction (VMT) and macular hole (MH). Both conditions can present with metamorphopsia and decreased vision. In cases of symptomatic VMT and full-thickness macular hole, pars plana vitrectomy has long been the standard of care. However, due to the possible surgical complications and need for postoperative care, many have searched for non-surgical options via pharmacologic vitreolysis. Ocriplasmin (Jetrea, Thrombogenics USA, Alcon/Novartis EU) is a recombinant protease approved in October 2012 for the treatment of symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion (VMA). There have been conflicting views on the safety of Ocriplasmin with changes in the ellipsoid zone seen on OCT and changes seen on ERG indicating photoreceptor damage. This publication reviews the efficacy and safety of ocriplasmin injection for VMA based on previously published data.

Shi Y, Wang H, Yin J, Zhang X, Li M, Xin C, Chen X, Wang N. Outcomes of microcatheter-assisted trabeculotomy following failed angle surgeries in primary congenital glaucoma. Eye (Lond) 2017;31(1):132-139.Abstract

PurposeTo report surgical outcomes of microcatheter-assisted trabeculotomy following failed angle surgeries, and compare those with no previous angle surgery, in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG).MethodsThe early postoperative (12 months) results of 42 eyes of 36 patients who underwent microcatheter-assisted trabeculotomy by single surgeon for PCG were retrospectively analyzed. Group 1, 20 eyes of 16 patients, had no previous angle surgery. Group 2, 22 eyes of 20 patients, had one or two previous failed angle surgeries. Success was defined as an intraocular pressure (IOP) <21 mm Hg with at least a 30% reduction from preoperative IOP with (qualified success) or without (complete success) the use of antiglaucoma medication.ResultsMean IOP decreased from 31.5±7.2 mm Hg on 3 (median, range: 1-5) medications in Group 1 and 34.6±7.3 mm Hg on 3 (median, range: 1-4) medications in Group 2 preoperatively to 15.6±3.1 mm Hg on 0 (median, range: 0-4) medications in Group 1 and 16.0±4.6 mm Hg on 0 (median, range: 0-2) medications in Group 2 postoperatively at 12 months (both P<0.001), respectively. The mean percentage of IOP reduction from preoperative to last postoperative visit was 46.0±20.1% in Group 1 and 45.5±25.0% in Group 2, P=0.947. Qualified and complete successes were comparable between Group 1 and Group 2 (qualified success: 90.0% vs 77.3%, P=0.294; complete success: 78.9% vs 77.3%, P=0.853). Complications were minimal.ConclusionsMicrocatheter-assisted trabeculotomy achieved significant pressure-lowering effects with a reduction in medication use in PCG, and it represents a reasonable choice of initial and repeat surgical treatment for PCG.

Springelkamp H, Iglesias AI, Mishra A, Höhn R, Wojciechowski R, Khawaja AP, Nag A, Wang YX, Wang JJ, Cuellar-Partida G, Gibson J, Cooke Bailey JN, Vithana EN, Gharahkhani P, Boutin T, Ramdas WD, Zeller T, Luben RN, Yonova-Doing E, Viswanathan AC, Yazar S, Cree AJ, Haines JL, Koh JY, Souzeau E, Wilson JF, Amin N, Müller C, Venturini C, Kearns LS, Kang JH, Kang JH, Tham YC, Zhou T, van Leeuwen EM, Nickels S, Sanfilippo P, Liao J, van der Linde H, Zhao W, van Koolwijk LME, Zheng L, Rivadeneira F, Baskaran M, van der Lee SJ, Perera S, de Jong PTVM, Oostra BA, Uitterlinden AG, Fan Q, Hofman A, Tai E-S, Vingerling JR, Sim X, Wolfs RCW, Teo YY, Lemij HG, Khor CC, Willemsen R, Lackner KJ, Aung T, Jansonius NM, Montgomery G, Wild PS, Young TL, Burdon KP, Hysi PG, Pasquale LR, Wong TY, Klaver CCW, Hewitt AW, Jonas JB, Mitchell P, Lotery AJ, Foster PJ, Vitart V, Pfeiffer N, Craig JE, Mackey DA, Hammond CJ, Wiggs JL, Cheng C-Y, van Duijn CM, Macgregor S. New insights into the genetics of primary open-angle glaucoma based on meta-analyses of intraocular pressure and optic disc characteristics. Hum Mol Genet 2017;Abstract

Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), the most common optic neuropathy, is a heritable disease. Siblings of POAG cases have a ten-fold increase risk of developing the disease. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and optic nerve head characteristics are used clinically to predict POAG risk. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of IOP and optic disc parameters and validated our findings in multiple sets of POAG cases and controls. Using imputation to the 1000 genomes (1000G) reference set, we identified 9 new genomic regions associated with vertical cup disc ratio (VCDR) and 1 new region associated with IOP. Additionally, we found 5 novel loci for optic nerve cup area and 6 for disc area. Previously it was assumed that genetic variation influenced POAG either through IOP or via changes to the optic nerve head; here we present evidence that some genomic regions affect both IOP and the disc parameters. We characterized the effect of the novel loci through pathway analysis and found that pathways involved are not entirely distinct as assumed so far. Further, we identified a novel association between CDKN1A and POAG. Using a zebrafish model we show that six6b (associated with POAG and optic nerve head variation) alters the expression of cdkn1a In summary, we have identified several novel genes influencing the major clinical risk predictors of POAG and showed that genetic variation in CDKN1A is important in POAG risk.

Starks V, Durand M, Ryan E, Lefebvre D. Human Bot Fly Infestation of the Eyelid. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2017;
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Thanos A, Todorich B, Hypes SM, Yonekawa Y, Thomas B, Randhawa S, Drenser KA, Trese MT. RETINAL VASCULAR TORTUOSITY AND EXUDATIVE RETINOPATHY IN A FAMILY WITH DYSKERATOSIS CONGENITA MASQUERADING AS FAMILIAL EXUDATIVE VITREORETINOPATHY. Retin Cases Brief Rep 2017;11 Suppl 1:S187-S190.Abstract

PURPOSE: To report a novel presentation of dyskeratosis congenita masquerading as familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. METHODS: Observational case series involving single family and literature review. RESULTS: A brother and sister were diagnosed with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy at ages 4 and 2, respectively. Both patients were managed with laser photocoagulation. Eight years after the initial presentation, both siblings developed pancytopenia secondary to bone marrow failure. Laboratory work-up revealed severely shortened telomere length in both patients, and genetic testing revealed a missense mutation in the gene that encodes the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase, confirming the diagnosis of dyskeratosis congenita. The father of both children was a carrier of the same mutation, who exhibited marked retinal vascular tortuosity of the second-order vessels. CONCLUSION: Dyskeratosis congenita is a severe multisystem disorder, which should be considered in cases of pediatric exudative retinopathies with concurrent signs and/or symptoms of bone marrow failure.

Thon OR, Gittinger JW. Medication-Related Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):134-143.Abstract

Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome refers to elevated intracranial pressure associated with papilledema without an identified etiology for intracranial hypertension. Over the past few decades, several medications have been described to be associated with this syndrome. We searched the literature for those case reports and series and evaluated the evidence for the association of such medications with pseudotumor cerebri syndrome.

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Vodopivec I, Cestari DM, Rizzo JF. Management of Transient Monocular Vision Loss and Retinal Artery Occlusions. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):125-133.Abstract

Acute transient or permanent retinal occlusive disease requires prompt medical attention and can be an ophthalmological emergency. Central retinal artery occlusion leads to permanent and severe monocular visual loss in the majority of patients. Transient monocular vision loss leaves no permanent deficits, but requires the same level of clinical vigilance, as it portends possible future adverse events, including loss of vision and stroke. Acute treatment options remain limited, and secondary prevention of cerebral ischemic events is the mainstay of management. This article reviews the current evidence for managing patients with retinal ischemia.

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Wolkow N, Jakobiec FA, Stagner AM, Cunnane ME, Piantadosi AL, Basgoz N, Lefebvre D. Chronic orbital and calvarial fungal infection with Apophysomyces variabilis in an immunocompetent patient. Surv Ophthalmol 2017;62(1):70-82.Abstract

Apophysomyces is a rare fungal organism causing rhino-orbito-cerebral mycotic infections with high morbidity and mortality, typically in immunocompetent individuals. Several cases of Apophysomyces elegans orbital disease have been reported. Herein, we report a case of Apophysomyces variabilis infection involving the orbit, sinuses, and calvarium in an immunocompetent 74-year-old woman, with a review of the literature. Unlike prior cases of A. elegans classic rhino-orbito-cerebral infection, our case included diffuse calvarial lytic lesions and overlying soft tissue nodules, but without parenchymal intracranial involvement. There was radiographic and clinical evidence of infarction of the orbital contents and cavernous sinus thrombosis. Anastomoses between the superior orbital (ophthalmic) vein and diploic veins of the calvarium are believed to be primarily responsible for the unusual mode of spread on the extradural surface of the brain. Although the patient stabilized without definitive surgical intervention, her disease slowly and intermittently progressed for over a year after presentation, requiring multiple courses of antifungal treatment.

Woods SE, Lieberman MT, Lebreton F, Trowel E, de la Fuente-Núñez C, Dzink-Fox J, Gilmore MS, Fox JG. Characterization of Multi-Drug Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolated from Cephalic Recording Chambers in Research Macaques (Macaca spp.). PLoS One 2017;12(1):e0169293.Abstract

Nonhuman primates are commonly used for cognitive neuroscience research and often surgically implanted with cephalic recording chambers for electrophysiological recording. Aerobic bacterial cultures from 25 macaques identified 72 bacterial isolates, including 15 Enterococcus faecalis isolates. The E. faecalis isolates displayed multi-drug resistant phenotypes, with resistance to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, bacitracin, and erythromycin, as well as high-level aminoglycoside resistance. Multi-locus sequence typing showed that most belonged to two E. faecalis sequence types (ST): ST 4 and ST 55. The genomes of three representative isolates were sequenced to identify genes encoding antimicrobial resistances and other traits. Antimicrobial resistance genes identified included aac(6')-aph(2"), aph(3')-III, str, ant(6)-Ia, tetM, tetS, tetL, ermB, bcrABR, cat, and dfrG, and polymorphisms in parC (S80I) and gyrA (S83I) were observed. These isolates also harbored virulence factors including the cytolysin toxin genes in ST 4 isolates, as well as multiple biofilm-associated genes (esp, agg, ace, SrtA, gelE, ebpABC), hyaluronidases (hylA, hylB), and other survival genes (ElrA, tpx). Crystal violet biofilm assays confirmed that ST 4 isolates produced more biofilm than ST 55 isolates. The abundance of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor genes in the ST 4 isolates likely relates to the loss of CRISPR-cas. This macaque colony represents a unique model for studying E. faecalis infection associated with indwelling devices, and provides an opportunity to understand the basis of persistence of this pathogen in a healthcare setting.

Wu D, Qian T, Nakao T, Xu J, Liu Z, Sun X, Chu Y, Hong J. Medically uncontrolled conjunctival pyogenic granulomas: correlation between clinical characteristics and histological findings. Oncotarget 2017;8(2):2020-2024.Abstract

BACKGROUND: Conjunctival pyogenic granulomas are commonly seen after ocular surgeries or at an ocular wound site. The aim of this study is to describe a novel histological classification for medically uncontrolled conjunctival pyogenic granulomas (MUCPG), and to explore whether the diversity in clinical features correlates to different histological subtypes of MUCPG. METHODS: This is an observational cross-section case series. We reviewed 46 consecutive patients with conjunctival pyogenic granulomas who did not respond to topical corticosteroids and underwent surgical excision from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2015. Clinical features and histological findings were presented and analyzed. RESULTS: Ocular surgery, accidental injury, and chalazion were the main predisposing causes of MUCPG. The lesions tended to occur unilaterally on the bulbar conjunctiva. Forty patients (87%) presented an enrichment of inflammatory cells and proliferated capillaries in their pathological sections (inflammatory pattern). Six patients (13%) showed relatively few inflammatory cells and capillaries within fibrous stroma (fibrous pattern). Patients with the inflammatory pattern were older (p = 0.025) and tended to be located in bulbar conjunctiva (p = 0.002). The predisposing causes were also different between two histological subtypes (p = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: We found the correlation between clinical presentation and histological subtypes in patients with MUCPG, indicating this disease may need a new classification scheme.

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Zhou C, Robert M-C, Kapoulea V, Lei F, Stagner AM, Jakobiec FA, Dohlman CH, Paschalis EI. Sustained Subconjunctival Delivery of Infliximab Protects the Cornea and Retina Following Alkali Burn to the Eye. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2017;58(1):96-105.Abstract

Purpose: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is upregulated in eyes following corneal alkali injury and contributes to corneal and also retinal damage. Prompt TNF-α inhibition by systemic infliximab ameliorates retinal damage and improves corneal wound healing. However, systemic administration of TNF-α inhibitors carries risk of significant complications, whereas topical eye-drop delivery is hindered by poor ocular bioavailability and the need for patient adherence. This study investigates the efficacy of subconjunctival delivery of TNF-α antibodies using a polymer-based drug delivery system (DDS). Methods: The drug delivery system was prepared using porous polydimethylsiloxane/polyvinyl alcohol composite fabrication and loaded with 85 μg of infliximab. Six Dutch-belted pigmented rabbits received ocular alkali burn with NaOH. Immediately after the burn, subconjunctival implantation of anti-TNF-α DDS was performed in three rabbits while another three received sham DDS (without antibody). Rabbits were followed with photography for 3 months. Results: After 3 months, the device was found to be well tolerated by the host and the eyes exhibited less corneal damage as compared to eyes implanted with a sham DDS without drug. The low dose treatment suppressed CD45 and TNF-α expression in the burned cornea and inhibited retinal ganglion cell apoptosis and optic nerve degeneration, as compared to the sham DDS treated eyes. Immunolocalization revealed drug penetration in the conjunctiva, cornea, iris, and choroid, with residual infliximab in the DDS 3 months after implantation. Conclusions: This reduced-risk biologic DDS improves corneal wound healing and provides retinal neuroprotection, and may be applicable not only to alkali burns but also to other inflammatory surgical procedures such as penetrating keratoplasty and keratoprosthesis implantation.

Zhou X, Ramke M, Chintakuntlawar AV, Lee JY, Rajaiya J, Chodosh J. Role of MyD88 in adenovirus keratitis. Immunol Cell Biol 2017;95(1):108-116.Abstract

Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical to the early detection and innate immune responses to pathogens. In particular, the toll-like receptor (TLR) system and its associated adaptor proteins have essential roles in early host responses to infection. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, caused by the human adenovirus, is a severe ocular surface infection associated with corneal inflammation (stromal keratitis). We previously showed that adenovirus capsid was a key molecular pattern in adenovirus keratitis, with viral DNA having a lesser role. We have now investigated the role of the adaptor molecule MyD88 in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis in which there is no viral replication. In MyD88(-/-) mice infected with human adenovirus type 37, clinical keratitis was markedly reduced, along with infiltration of CD45(+) cells, and expression of inflammatory cytokines. Reduction of inflammatory cytokines was also observed in infected primary human corneal fibroblasts pretreated with a MyD88 inhibitory peptide. Keratitis similar to wild type mice was observed in TLR2, TLR9 and IL-1R knockout mice, but was reduced in TLR2/9 double knockout mice, consistent with synergy of TLR2 and TLR9 in the response to adenovirus infection. MyD88 co-immunoprecipitated with Src kinase in mice corneas and in human corneal fibroblasts infected with adenovirus, and MyD88 inhibitory peptide reduced Src phosphorylation, linking MyD88 activation to inflammatory gene expression through a signaling cascade previously shown to be directed by Src. Our findings reveal a critical role for the PRRs TLR2 and 9, and their adaptor protein MyD88, in corneal inflammation upon adenovirus infection.

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