September 2018

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Shi C, Luo G. A Streaming Motion Magnification Core for Smart Image Sensors. IEEE Trans Circuits Syst II Express Briefs 2018;65(9):1229-1233.Abstract
This paper proposes a modified Eulerian Video Magnification (EVM) algorithm and a hardware implementation of a motion magnification core for smart image sensors. Compared to the original EVM algorithm, we perform the pixel-wise temporal bandpass filtering only once rather than multiple times on all scale layers, to reduce the memory and multiplier requirement for hardware implementation. A pixel stream processing architecture with pipelined blocks is proposed for the magnification core, enabling it to readily fit common image sensing components with streaming pixel output, while achieving higher performance with lower system cost. We implemented an FPGA-based prototype that is able to process up to 90M pixels per second and magnify subtle motion. The motion magnification results are comparable to the original algorithm running on PC.
Singh RB, Batta P. Herpes simplex virus keratitis mimicking Acanthamoeba keratitis: a clinicopathological correlation. BMJ Case Rep 2018;2018Abstract
A 36-year-old male, soft contact lens wearer was referred by his primary ophthalmologist for corneal ulcer of the right eye (OD), which was persistent despite topical fluoroquinolone therapy for 1 month. A ring-shaped infiltrate typically seen in Acanthamoeba infection was noted, and topical therapy with chlorhexidine and polyhexamethylene biguanide was initiated. However, the patient's condition deteriorated over the next several weeks; thus, diagnostic and therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed. The postoperative immunohistochemical analysis suggested a diagnosis of herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis. The patient ultimately improved after initiation of oral valacyclovir following penetrating keratoplasty. We report a case of a commonly encountered clinical entity, HSV keratitis, with an atypical clinical presentation, masquerading as Acanthamoeba keratitis.
Sun Y, Smith LEH. Retinal Vasculature in Development and Diseases. Annu Rev Vis Sci 2018;4:101-122.Abstract
The retina is one of the most metabolically active tissues in the body, consuming high levels of oxygen and nutrients. A well-organized ocular vascular system adapts to meet the metabolic requirements of the retina to ensure visual function. Pathological conditions affect growth of the blood vessels in the eye. Understanding the neuronal biological processes that govern retinal vascular development is of interest for translational researchers and clinicians to develop preventive and interventional therapeutics for vascular eye diseases that address early drivers of abnormal vascular growth. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the cellular and molecular processes governing both physiological and pathological retinal vascular development, which is dependent on the interaction among retinal cell populations, including neurons, glia, immune cells, and vascular endothelial cells. We also review animal models currently used for studying retinal vascular development.
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Tauqeer Z, Jakobiec FA, Freitag SK, Yoon MK, Wolkow N. Orbital Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma Following Radiotherapy: A Report of 2 Cases. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2018;Abstract
PURPOSE: To present 2 patients in whom orbital radiation preceded the development of periorbital extranodal marginal zone lymphoma by more than a decade and to investigate the likelihood of this representing irradiation-induced malignancy. METHODS: Retrospective chart review and histopathologic study with immunohistochemistry of 2 cases. RESULTS: The first patient was a 58-year-old woman who developed an orbital mass within the vicinity of the lateral rectus muscle 17 years after external beam proton radiation therapy for an inferotemporal choroidal melanoma. The second patient was a 32-year-old woman who developed a mass in the right lacrimal gland 12 years after external beam photon radiation therapy for chronic inflammatory dacryoadenitis. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical studies confirmed orbital extranodal marginal zone lymphoma in both cases. Retrospective review of older histopathologic slides from the second patient revealed underlying immunoglobulin G4-related disease. DISCUSSION: The unusual sequence of events in these 2 cases raises the question of whether orbital radiation may in rare instances promote the development of orbital extranodal marginal zone lymphoma. The literature pertaining to irradiation-induced secondary malignancy in the orbit is reviewed. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should consider the possibility of a secondary malignancy when evaluating a patient with an orbital mass and a history of prior local radiation exposure.
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Wittmann J, Dieckow J, Schröder H, Hampel U, Garreis F, Jacobi C, Milczarek A, Hsieh KL, Pulli B, Chen JW, Hoogeboom S, Bräuer L, Paulsen FP, Schob S, Schicht M. Plasma gelsolin promotes re-epithelialization. Sci Rep 2018;8(1):13140.Abstract
Woundhealing disorders characterized by impaired or delayed re-epithelialization are a serious medical problem that is painful and difficult to treat. Gelsolin (GSN), a known actin modulator, supports epithelial cell regeneration and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the potential of recombinant gelsolin (rhu-pGSN) for ocular surface regeneration to establish a novel therapy for delayed or complicated wound healing. We analyzed the influence of gelsolin on cell proliferation and wound healing in vitro, in vivo/ex vivo and by gene knockdown. Gelsolin is expressed in all tested tissues of the ocular system as shown by molecular analysis. The concentration of GSN is significantly increased in tear fluid samples of patients with dry eye disease. rhu-pGSN induces cell proliferation and faster wound healing in vitro as well as in vivo/ex vivo. TGF-β dependent transcription of SMA is significantly decreased after GSN gene knockdown. Gelsolin is an inherent protein of the ocular system and is secreted into the tear fluid. Our results show a positive effect on corneal cell proliferation and wound healing. Furthermore, GSN regulates the synthesis of SMA in myofibroblasts, which establishes GSN as a key protein of TGF-β dependent cell differentiation.
Wolkow N, Jakobiec FA, Dryja TP, Lefebvre DR. Mild Complications or Unusual Persistence of Porcine Collagen and Hyaluronic Acid Gel Following Periocular Filler Injections. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2018;Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the histopathologic appearance of dermal eyelid fillers that were unexpectedly encountered in ophthalmic plastic surgery samples from patients with mild eyelid disfigurements, and to review eyelid cases with complications that had previously been described in the literature. A retrospective histopathologic study with Alcian blue, elastic, and Masson trichrome stains of 2 cases that were submitted to the Ocular Pathology Department was conducted, and a critical review of previously published cases of the histopathologic characteristics of dermal filler material in the periocular region was also conducted. Two periocular tissue samples were found to contain dermal filler material. In one case, porcine collagen appeared as amorphous or indistinctly microfibrillar aggregates that stained light blue with the Masson trichrome method. In the other case, hyaluronic acid gel appeared as vivid blue amorphous pools of material in extracellular locules after staining with the Alcian blue method. An inflammatory response was not observed in either case. Patients who undergo facial filler procedures may, at a later time, require a surgical excisional procedure from which a specimen is generated. Previously injected dermal filler that the patient neglected to mention may be present in the pathologic sample, potentially perplexing the unsuspecting pathologist. Both ophthalmic plastic surgeons and ocular pathologists should be aware of the histopathologic features of dermal fillers. It is helpful if a surgeon who submits a specimen to the pathology service makes note of any known prior use of facial filler material or is alert to its possible presence when unfamiliar foreign material is discovered in the dermis of the eyelids.
Wolkow N, Jakobiec FA, Yoon MK. Gelatin-Based Hemostatic Agents: Histopathologic Differences. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2018;Abstract
PURPOSE: To delineate the histopathologic appearance of gelatin-based hemostatic agents, Surgiflo, Gelfoam, and Floseal, which are used by ophthalmic plastic surgeons, and which may incidentally be found as foreign materials in histopathologic tissue samples. METHODS: Histopathologic analysis was performed with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, Masson trichrome, and elastin staining on tissue samples in which gelatin-based agents were found. To better characterize these materials, similar analyses were performed on in vitro samples of commonly used gelatin-based hemostatic agents. RESULTS: Surgiflo and Gelfoam are composed of small stellate pieces of gelatin with a smooth, homogeneous quality. In tissues, they are faintly positive with periodic acid-Schiff staining, amphophilic with Masson trichrome staining, and ink-black with elastin staining. Floseal has a distinctly different morphology of large rectangular sheets, yet almost identical in vitro staining properties. DISCUSSION: While the morphology of the gelatin-based hemostatic agents is consistent under various conditions, the staining properties of these materials differ based on whether they have been in contact with human tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Gelatin-derived hemostatic agents are best identified based on their morphologic characteristics. Elastin staining highlights these materials prominently within tissue samples and may be helpful in distinguishing them from other foreign materials.

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