2017

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Sharma M, Hunter DG. Diplopia after Strabismus Surgery. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;:1-6.Abstract
Diplopia is a disappointing and, at times, unanticipated consequence of what might otherwise be considered anatomically successful strabismus surgery. In this study, we review the existing literature regarding diplopia after strabismus surgery in the context of the senior author's experience. We divide postoperative diplopia types into cases that occur in the setting of normal binocular vision (or "normal" suppression) vs. cases that are the consequence of rare or anomalous sensorial adaptations. We then discuss how to identify patients at greatest risk based on history and preoperative testing, and we offer strategies for managing these sometimes-challenging cases.
Sheppard JD, Foster SC, Toyos MM, Markwardt K, Da Vanzo R, Flynn TE, Kempen JH. Difluprednate 0.05% versus Prednisolone Acetate 1% for Endogenous Anterior Uveitis: Pooled Efficacy Analysis of Two Phase 3 Studies. Ocul Immunol Inflamm 2017;:1-13.Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyse pooled data from 2 similar phase 3 noninferiority studies comparing difluprednate 0.05% versus prednisolone acetate 1% in patients with endogenous anterior uveitis. METHODS: Patients received difluprednate alternating with vehicle or prednisolone acetate for 14 days (8 drops/day in both groups), followed by tapering from day 14 to 28. All patients were observed until day 42. RESULTS: More patients on difluprednate than on prednisolone acetate were cleared of anterior chamber cells on day twenty one (71.3% vs 54.7%; p = 0.02); results were similar at the other time points. Treatment withdrawals were higher with prednisolone acetate than difluprednate (19.8% vs 7.4%; log-rank p = 0.02). Study discontinuation due to lack of efficacy was also higher with prednisolone acetate than difluprednate (14.0% vs 0%; p = 0.0002 [pre-specified exploratory analysis]). CONCLUSIONS: More difluprednate-treated eyes were quiet following 21 days of treatment, and difluprednate-treated patients were much less likely to be withdrawn from the study because of treatment failure.
Shi Y, Wang H, Yin J, Zhang X, Li M, Xin C, Chen X, Wang N. Outcomes of microcatheter-assisted trabeculotomy following failed angle surgeries in primary congenital glaucoma. Eye (Lond) 2017;31(1):132-139.Abstract

PurposeTo report surgical outcomes of microcatheter-assisted trabeculotomy following failed angle surgeries, and compare those with no previous angle surgery, in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG).MethodsThe early postoperative (12 months) results of 42 eyes of 36 patients who underwent microcatheter-assisted trabeculotomy by single surgeon for PCG were retrospectively analyzed. Group 1, 20 eyes of 16 patients, had no previous angle surgery. Group 2, 22 eyes of 20 patients, had one or two previous failed angle surgeries. Success was defined as an intraocular pressure (IOP) <21 mm Hg with at least a 30% reduction from preoperative IOP with (qualified success) or without (complete success) the use of antiglaucoma medication.ResultsMean IOP decreased from 31.5±7.2 mm Hg on 3 (median, range: 1-5) medications in Group 1 and 34.6±7.3 mm Hg on 3 (median, range: 1-4) medications in Group 2 preoperatively to 15.6±3.1 mm Hg on 0 (median, range: 0-4) medications in Group 1 and 16.0±4.6 mm Hg on 0 (median, range: 0-2) medications in Group 2 postoperatively at 12 months (both P<0.001), respectively. The mean percentage of IOP reduction from preoperative to last postoperative visit was 46.0±20.1% in Group 1 and 45.5±25.0% in Group 2, P=0.947. Qualified and complete successes were comparable between Group 1 and Group 2 (qualified success: 90.0% vs 77.3%, P=0.294; complete success: 78.9% vs 77.3%, P=0.853). Complications were minimal.ConclusionsMicrocatheter-assisted trabeculotomy achieved significant pressure-lowering effects with a reduction in medication use in PCG, and it represents a reasonable choice of initial and repeat surgical treatment for PCG.

Silpa-Archa S, Ponwong A, Preble JM, Foster SC. Culture-Positive Endogenous Endophthalmitis: An Eleven-Year Retrospective Study in the Central Region of Thailand. Ocul Immunol Inflamm 2017;:1-10.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the characteristics of infection and prognostic factors of endogenous endophthalmitis (EE) over an 11-year period. METHODS: The clinical records of 41 eyes of 36 patients diagnosed with culture-proven EE at the Rajavithi Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Median age at presentation was 58 years. Liver abscess (19%) and urinary tract infections (19%) were the most common sources of infection. The most common causative agents were gram-negative organisms (48%). The most commonly isolated microorganism was Klebsiella pneumoniae (26.8%). Worse initial visual acuity and severe intraocular inflammation at first presentation were equally associated with poor visual outcome in the multivariate model (adjusted odds ratio, 20.32; 95% confidence interval [1.12-357.45]; P = 0.040). CONCLUSIONS: Endogenous endophthalmitis usually has a poor visual prognosis. Liver abscess and urinary tract infections are common primary sites of infection. Poor initial visual acuity and severe intraocular inflammation at the initial presentation are predictors of poor visual outcome.
Silva PS, El-Rami H, Barham R, Gupta A, Fleming A, van Hemert J, Cavallerano JD, Sun JK, Aiello LP. Hemorrhage and/or Microaneurysm Severity and Count in Ultrawide Field Images and Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study Photography. Ophthalmology 2017;124(7):970-976.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate detection of hemorrhage and/or microaneurysm (H/Ma) using ultrawide field (UWF) retinal imaging as compared with standard Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) 7-field photographs (ETDRS photos). DESIGN: Single-site comparative study of UWF images and ETDRS photos. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred twenty-six eyes of 69 patients with no diabetic retinopathy (DR) or mild or moderate nonproliferative DR (NPDR). METHODS: Stereoscopic 200° UWF images and stereoscopic 35mm 30° 7-field color photographs were acquired on the same visit. Images were graded for severity and distribution of H/Ma. H/Mas were counted in ETDRS fields 2 to 7 in both ETDRS photos and UWF images. H/Mas in the UWF peripheral fields were also counted. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Kappa (κ) and weighted κ statistics for agreement. Number of H/Ma within and outside ETDRS fields identified in UWF images and ETDRS photos. RESULTS: Distribution of DR severity by ETDRS photos was 24 (19.0%) no DR, 48 (38.1%) mild NPDR, and 54 (42.9%) moderate NPDR. A total of 748 of 756 fields (98.9%) were gradable for H/Mas on ETDRS photos and UWF images. Simple κ/weighted κ statistics for severity of H/Ma: all fields 0.61/0.69, field 2 0.70/0.77, field 3 0.62/0.73, field 4 0.50/0.62, field 5 0.54/0.65, field 6 0.64/0.70, and field 7 0.58/0.63 with overall exact agreement in 81.3% and within 1 step in 97.9% of fields. A greater proportion of fields was graded a more severe H/Ma level in UWF images than in the corresponding ETDRS photos (UWF: 12.7% vs. ETDRS: 6.5%). Evaluating comparable areas in UWF images and ETDRS photos (fields 2-7), a mean of 42.8 H/Mas were identified using ETDRS photos and 48.8 in UWF images (P = 0.10). An additional mean of 21.3 H/Mas (49.8% increase, P < 0.0001) were identified in the peripheral fields of the UWF images. CONCLUSIONS: There is good to excellent agreement between UWF images and ETDRS photos in determining H/Ma severity, with excellent correlation of H/Ma counts within ETDRS photo fields. UWF peripheral fields identified 49.8% more H/Ma, suggesting a more severe H/Ma in 12.7% of eyes. Given the additional lesions detected in peripheral fields and the known risks associated with H/Ma and peripheral lesions, quantification of H/Ma using UWF images may provide a more accurate representation of DR disease activity and potential greater accuracy in predicting DR progression.
da Silva S, Cepko CL. Fgf8 Expression and Degradation of Retinoic Acid Are Required for Patterning a High-Acuity Area in the Retina. Dev Cell 2017;42(1):68-81.e6.Abstract
Species that are highly reliant on their visual system have a specialized retinal area subserving high-acuity vision, e.g., the fovea in humans. Although of critical importance for our daily activities, little is known about the mechanisms driving the development of retinal high-acuity areas (HAAs). Using the chick as a model, we found a precise and dynamic expression pattern of fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) in the HAA anlage, which was regulated by enzymes that degrade retinoic acid (RA). Transient manipulation of RA signaling, or reduction of Fgf8 expression, disrupted several features of HAA patterning, including photoreceptor distribution, ganglion cell density, and organization of interneurons. Notably, patterned expression of RA signaling components was also found in humans, suggesting that RA also plays a role in setting up the human fovea.
Silva PS, Gupta A, Ajlan RS, Schlossman DK, Tolson AM, Cavallerano JD, Aiello LP. Ultrawide field scanning laser ophthalmoscopy imaging of lipemia retinalis. Acta Ophthalmol 2017;Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristic retinal features of lipemia retinalis when using ultrawide field scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. MAIN POINTS: We report a case series of three subjects with ultrawide field retinal images showing cream discoloration of the fundus, light salmon-coloured posterior retinal vessels and greyish pink peripheral vasculature. On green-only imaging, many of the vessels appear light rather than typically dark. CONCLUSION: Lipemia retinalis is readily apparent on ultrawide field imaging and illustrates the alterations that systemic diseases may induce in the posterior and peripheral retinal vasculature. Ultrawide field imaging highlights the disparate vascular appearance of the posterior pole and retinal periphery in this condition.
Simavli H, Poon LY-C, Que CJ, Liu Y, Akduman M, Tsikata E, de Boer JF, Chen TC. Diagnostic Capability of Peripapillary Retinal Volume Measurements in Glaucoma. J Glaucoma 2017;26(6):592-601.Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the diagnostic capability of spectral domain optical coherence tomography peripapillary retinal volume (RV) measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 156 patients, 89 primary open-angle glaucoma and 67 normal subjects, were recruited. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography peripapillary RV was calculated for 4 quadrants using 3 annuli of varying scan circle diameters: outer circumpapillary annuli of circular grids 1, 2, and 3 (OCA1, OCA2, OCA3). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves and pairwise comparisons of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed to determine which quadrants were best for diagnosing primary open-angle glaucoma. The pairwise comparisons of the best ROC curves for RV and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) were performed. The artifact rates were analyzed. RESULTS: Pairwise comparisons showed that the smaller annuli OCA1 and OCA2 had better diagnostic performance than the largest annulus OCA3 (P<0.05 for all quadrants). OCA1 and OCA2 had similar diagnostic performance, except for the inferior quadrant which was better for OCA1 (P=0.0033). The pairwise comparisons of the best ROC curves for RV and RNFL were not statistically significant. RV measurements had lower rates of artifacts at 7.4% while RNFL measurements had higher rates at 42.9%. CONCLUSIONS: Peripapillary RV measurements have excellent ability for diagnosing not only glaucoma patients but also a subset of early glaucoma patients. The inferior quadrant of peripapillary annulus OCA1 demonstrated the best diagnostic capability for both glaucoma and early glaucoma. The diagnostic ability of RV is comparable with that of RNFL parameters in glaucoma but with lower artifact rates.
Sobrin L, Chong YH, Fan Q, Gan A, Stanwyck LK, Kaidonis G, Craig JE, Kim J, Liao W-L, Huang Y-C, Lee W-J, Hung Y-J, Guo X, Hai Y, Ipp E, Pollack S, Hancock H, Price A, Penman A, Mitchell P, Liew G, Smith AV, Gudnason V, Tan G, Klein BEK, Kuo J, Li X, Christiansen MW, Psaty BM, Sandow K, Sandow K, Jensen RA, Klein R, Cotch MF, Wang JJ, Jia Y, Chen CJ, Chen Y-DI, Rotter JI, Tsai F-J, Hanis CL, Burdon KP, Wong TY, Cheng C-Y. Genetically Determined Plasma Lipid Levels and Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Mendelian Randomization Study. Diabetes 2017;66(12):3130-3141.Abstract
Results from observational studies examining dyslipidemia as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy (DR) have been inconsistent. We evaluated the causal relationship between plasma lipids and DR using a Mendelian randomization approach. We pooled genome-wide association studies summary statistics from 18 studies for two DR phenotypes: any DR (N = 2,969 case and 4,096 control subjects) and severe DR (N = 1,277 case and 3,980 control subjects). Previously identified lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms served as instrumental variables. Meta-analysis to combine the Mendelian randomization estimates from different cohorts was conducted. There was no statistically significant change in odds ratios of having any DR or severe DR for any of the lipid fractions in the primary analysis that used single nucleotide polymorphisms that did not have a pleiotropic effect on another lipid fraction. Similarly, there was no significant association in the Caucasian and Chinese subgroup analyses. This study did not show evidence of a causal role of the four lipid fractions on DR. However, the study had limited power to detect odds ratios less than 1.23 per SD in genetically induced increase in plasma lipid levels, thus we cannot exclude that causal relationships with more modest effect sizes exist.
Solomon SD, Chew E, Duh EJ, Sobrin L, Sun JK, VanderBeek BL, Wykoff CC, Gardner TW. Diabetic Retinopathy: A Position Statement by the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2017;40(3):412-418.
Sood AB, Pearce WA, Workowski KA, Lockwood J, Yeh S. Combined Intravitreal and Systemic Antibiotic Therapy in a Patient with Syphilitic Uveitis. Ocul Immunol Inflamm 2017;:1-3.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the novel use of combined intravitreal and systemic antibiotic therapy in a patient with syphilitic panuveitis and discuss the management of ocular syphilis. METHODS: Case report Results: A 45-year old heterosexual male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with 1 month of blurry vision in both eyes. Clinical examination revealed a bilateral panuveitis. The patient denied history of genital lesions or rash, but did complain of difficulty hearing bilaterally. Treponemal EIA was positive, the RPR titer greater than 1:512 dilution, and CSF VDRL 1:4. A diagnosis of neurosyphilis and ocular syphilis was made based on the clinical and laboratory findings. The patient was admitted for systemic intravenous antibiotic therapy, but was noted to have a penicillin allergy. Intravitreal ceftazidime was promptly administered bilaterally to achieve treponemacidal levels of antibiotic therapy. After penicillin desensitization protocol, the patient received 14 days of intravenous penicillin with clinical resolution. CONCLUSIONS: There are increasing reports of ocular syphilis in the United States and delay in diagnosis and management can lead to severe visual impairment and blindness. We report the first case of adjunct intravitreal antibiotic therapy in a penicillin allergic patient. As ocular syphilis is a form of bacterial endophthalmitis, combination intravitreal and systemic antibiotics may be considered.
Spencer C, Abend S, McHugh KJ, Saint-Geniez M. Identification of a synergistic interaction between endothelial cells and retinal pigment epithelium. J Cell Mol Med 2017;21(10):2542-2552.Abstract
The retinal pigment epithelium located between the neurosensory retina and the choroidal vasculature is critical for the function and maintenance of both the photoreceptors and underlying capillary endothelium. While the trophic role of retinal pigment epithelium on choroidal endothelial cells is well recognized, the existence of a reciprocal regulatory function of endothelial cells on retinal pigment epithelium cells remained to be fully characterized. Using a physiological long-term co-culture system, we determined the effect of retinal pigment epithelium-endothelial cell heterotypic interactions on cell survival, behaviour and matrix deposition. Human retinal pigment epithelium and endothelial cells were cultured on opposite sides of polyester transwells for up to 4 weeks in low serum conditions. Cell viability was quantified using a trypan blue assay. Cellular morphology was evaluated by H&E staining, S.E.M. and immunohistochemistry. Retinal pigment epithelium phagocytic function was examined using a fluorescent bead assay. Gene expression analysis was performed on both retinal pigment epithelium and endothelial cells by quantitative PCR. Quantification of extracellular matrix deposition was performed on decellularized transwells stained for collagen IV, fibronectin and fibrillin. Our results showed that presence of endothelial cells significantly improves retinal pigment epithelium maturation and function as indicated by the induction of visual cycle-associated genes, accumulation of a Bruch's membrane-like matrix and increase in retinal pigment epithelium phagocytic activity. Co-culture conditions led to increased expression of anti-angiogenic growth factors and receptors in both retinal pigment epithelium and endothelial cells compared to monoculture. Tube-formation assays confirmed that co-culture with retinal pigment epithelium significantly decreased the angiogenic phenotype of endothelial cells. These findings provide evidence of critical interdependent interactions between retinal pigment epithelium and endothelial cell involved in the maintenance of retinal homeostasis.
Springelkamp H, Iglesias AI, Mishra A, Höhn R, Wojciechowski R, Khawaja AP, Nag A, Wang YX, Wang JJ, Cuellar-Partida G, Gibson J, Cooke Bailey JN, Vithana EN, Gharahkhani P, Boutin T, Ramdas WD, Zeller T, Luben RN, Yonova-Doing E, Viswanathan AC, Yazar S, Cree AJ, Haines JL, Koh JY, Souzeau E, Wilson JF, Amin N, Müller C, Venturini C, Kearns LS, Kang JH, Kang JH, Tham YC, Zhou T, van Leeuwen EM, Nickels S, Sanfilippo P, Liao J, van der Linde H, Zhao W, van Koolwijk LME, Zheng L, Rivadeneira F, Baskaran M, van der Lee SJ, Perera S, de Jong PTVM, Oostra BA, Uitterlinden AG, Fan Q, Hofman A, Tai E-S, Vingerling JR, Sim X, Wolfs RCW, Teo YY, Lemij HG, Khor CC, Willemsen R, Lackner KJ, Aung T, Jansonius NM, Montgomery G, Wild PS, Young TL, Burdon KP, Hysi PG, Pasquale LR, Wong TY, Klaver CCW, Hewitt AW, Jonas JB, Mitchell P, Lotery AJ, Foster PJ, Vitart V, Pfeiffer N, Craig JE, Mackey DA, Hammond CJ, Wiggs JL, Cheng C-Y, van Duijn CM, Macgregor S. New insights into the genetics of primary open-angle glaucoma based on meta-analyses of intraocular pressure and optic disc characteristics. Hum Mol Genet 2017;Abstract

Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), the most common optic neuropathy, is a heritable disease. Siblings of POAG cases have a ten-fold increase risk of developing the disease. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and optic nerve head characteristics are used clinically to predict POAG risk. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of IOP and optic disc parameters and validated our findings in multiple sets of POAG cases and controls. Using imputation to the 1000 genomes (1000G) reference set, we identified 9 new genomic regions associated with vertical cup disc ratio (VCDR) and 1 new region associated with IOP. Additionally, we found 5 novel loci for optic nerve cup area and 6 for disc area. Previously it was assumed that genetic variation influenced POAG either through IOP or via changes to the optic nerve head; here we present evidence that some genomic regions affect both IOP and the disc parameters. We characterized the effect of the novel loci through pathway analysis and found that pathways involved are not entirely distinct as assumed so far. Further, we identified a novel association between CDKN1A and POAG. Using a zebrafish model we show that six6b (associated with POAG and optic nerve head variation) alters the expression of cdkn1a In summary, we have identified several novel genes influencing the major clinical risk predictors of POAG and showed that genetic variation in CDKN1A is important in POAG risk.

Sriram S, Tran JA, Guo X, Hutcheon AEK, Kazlauskas A, Zieske JD. Development of wound healing models to study TGFβ3's effect on SMA. Exp Eye Res 2017;161:52-60.Abstract
The goal of this study was to test the efficacy of transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGFβ3) in reducing α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression in two models-an ex vivo organ culture and an in vitro 3D cell construct-both of which closely mimic an in vivo environment. For the ex vivo organ culture system, a central 6.0 mm corneal keratectomy was performed on freshly excised rabbit globes The corneas were then excised, segregated into groups treated with 1.0 ng/ml TGFβ1 or β3 (T1 or T3, respectively), and cultured for 2 weeks. The corneas were assessed for levels of haze and analyzed for SMA mRNA levels. For the 3D in vitro model, rabbit corneal fibroblasts (RbCFs) were cultured for 4 weeks on poly-transwell membranes in Eagle's minimum essential media (EMEM) + 10% FBS + 0.5 mM vitamin C ± 0.1 ng/ml T1 or T3. At the end of 4 weeks, the constructs were processed for analysis by indirect-immunofluorescence (IF) and RT-qPCR. The RT-qPCR data showed that SMA mRNA expression in T3 samples for both models was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than T1 treatment (around 3-fold in ex vivo and 2-fold in constructs). T3 also reduced the amount of scarring in ex vivo corneas as compared with the T1 samples. IF data from RbCF constructs confirmed that T3-treated samples had up to 4-fold (p < 0.05) lower levels of SMA protein expression than samples treated with T1. These results show that T3 when compared to T1 decreases the expression of SMA in both ex vivo organ culture and in vitro 3D cell construct models. Understanding the mechanism of T3's action in these systems and how they differ from simple cell culture models, may potentially help in developing T3 as an anti-scarring therapy.
Srivastava S, Gubbels CS, Dies K, Fulton A, Yu T, Sahin M. Increased Survival and Partly Preserved Cognition in a Patient With ACO2-Related Disease Secondary to a Novel Variant. J Child Neurol 2017;32(9):840-845.Abstract
ACO2 encodes aconitase 2, catalyzing the second step of the tricarboxylic acid. To date, there are only 6 reported families with 5 unique ACO2 mutations. Affected individuals can develop intellectual disability, epilepsy, brain atrophy, hypotonia, ataxia, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration. Here, we report an 18-year-old boy with a novel ACO2 variant discovered on whole-exome sequencing. He presented with childhood-onset ataxia, impaired self-help skills comparable to severe-profound intellectual disability, intractable epilepsy, cerebellar atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, optic atrophy, and pigmentary retinopathy. His variant is the sixth unique ACO2 mutation. In addition, compared to mild cases (isolated optic atrophy) and severe cases (infantile death), our patient may be moderately affected, evident by increased survival and some preserved cognition (ability to speak full sentences and follow commands), which is a novel presentation. This case expands the disease spectrum to include increased survival with partly spared cognition.
Stagner AM, Jakobiec FA, Fay A. Primary orbital synovial sarcoma: A clinicopathologic review with a differential diagnosis and discussion of molecular genetics. Surv Ophthalmol 2017;62(2):227-236.Abstract

Synovial sarcoma is a soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities developing in young adults that has rarely been reported in the orbit. Synovial sarcoma is associated with a unique translocation, resulting in an SYT-SSX fusion gene. We analyze 7 published periocular cases, together with the current one, to gain a better appreciation of the features of the tumor in this location and to compare the findings with those derived from nonophthalmic studies. An inferior orbital mass developed in a 31-year-old woman after experiencing periorbital and hemifacial pain for more than a decade. Radiographically, the mass was circumscribed and displayed coarse internal calcifications. A large but subtotal excision with histopathologic examination disclosed a primitive tumor composed of spindled and ovoid cells. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positivity for nuclear transducin-like enhancer of split 1 and membranous CD99, typical for synovial sarcoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization identified a (X,18) translocation in the tumor cells. The patient underwent postoperative adjuvant proton beam radiotherapy with a good response that has been maintained during 1 year of follow-up. Orbital soft-tissue tumors of all types are increasingly identified by their distinctive genetic signatures that offer more specificity than standard immunohistochemical tests.

Stapleton F, Alves M, Bunya VY, Jalbert I, Lekhanont K, Malet F, Na K-S, Schaumberg D, Uchino M, Vehof J, Viso E, Vitale S, Jones L. TFOS DEWS II Epidemiology Report. Ocul Surf 2017;15(3):334-365.Abstract
The subcommittee reviewed the prevalence, incidence, risk factors, natural history, morbidity and questionnaires reported in epidemiological studies of dry eye disease (DED). A meta-analysis of published prevalence data estimated the impact of age and sex. Global mapping of prevalence was undertaken. The prevalence of DED ranged from 5 to 50%. The prevalence of signs was higher and more variable than symptoms. There were limited prevalence studies in youth and in populations south of the equator. The meta-analysis confirmed that prevalence increases with age, however signs showed a greater increase per decade than symptoms. Women have a higher prevalence of DED than men, although differences become significant only with age. Risk factors were categorized as modifiable/non-modifiable, and as consistent, probable or inconclusive. Asian ethnicity was a mostly consistent risk factor. The economic burden and impact of DED on vision, quality of life, work productivity, psychological and physical impact of pain, are considerable, particularly costs due to reduced work productivity. Questionnaires used to evaluate DED vary in their utility. Future research should establish the prevalence of disease of varying severity, the incidence in different populations and potential risk factors such as youth and digital device usage. Geospatial mapping might elucidate the impact of climate, environment and socioeconomic factors. Given the limited study of the natural history of treated and untreated DED, this remains an important area for future research.
Starks V, Freitag SK. Postoperative Complications of Dermis-Fat Autografts in the Anophthalmic Socket. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;:1-4.Abstract
Reconstruction of the anophthalmic socket allows the use of an ocular prosthesis and rehabilitation of facial appearance. Dermis-fat grafting is one option in volume augmentation of the anophthalmic socket and presents unique benefits, including increased surface area within the socket and the ability to grow with pediatric patients. Postoperative complications of this procedure are relatively common. Minor complications, such as graft hirsutism, keratinization, and conjunctival cysts or granulomas, are managed easily by observation or simple intervention. Major complications, such as graft atrophy, infection, or ulceration, may prevent good prosthesis fit and may require return to the operating room.
Starks V, Durand M, Ryan E, Lefebvre D. Human Bot Fly Infestation of the Eyelid. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2017;
Sullivan DA, Rocha EM, Aragona P, Clayton JA, Ding J, Golebiowski B, Hampel U, McDermott AM, Schaumberg DA, Srinivasan S, Versura P, Willcox MDP. TFOS DEWS II Sex, Gender, and Hormones Report. Ocul Surf 2017;15(3):284-333.Abstract
One of the most compelling features of dry eye disease (DED) is that it occurs more frequently in women than men. In fact, the female sex is a significant risk factor for the development of DED. This sex-related difference in DED prevalence is attributed in large part to the effects of sex steroids (e.g. androgens, estrogens), hypothalamic-pituitary hormones, glucocorticoids, insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 and thyroid hormones, as well as to the sex chromosome complement, sex-specific autosomal factors and epigenetics (e.g. microRNAs). In addition to sex, gender also appears to be a risk factor for DED. "Gender" and "sex" are words that are often used interchangeably, but they have distinct meanings. "Gender" refers to a person's self-representation as a man or woman, whereas "sex" distinguishes males and females based on their biological characteristics. Both gender and sex affect DED risk, presentation of the disease, immune responses, pain, care-seeking behaviors, service utilization, and myriad other facets of eye health. Overall, sex, gender and hormones play a major role in the regulation of ocular surface and adnexal tissues, and in the difference in DED prevalence between women and men. The purpose of this Subcommittee report is to review and critique the nature of this role, as well as to recommend areas for future research to advance our understanding of the interrelationships between sex, gender, hormones and DED.

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