2018

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Madriz Peralta G, Cestari DM. An update of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2018;29(6):495-502.Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We aim to provide a comprehensive and updated review on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), including the most current studies and treatment options. Special focus will be put on recent theories about the pathophysiology, and on newer prospective studies on treatment modalities. RECENT FINDINGS: The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) provided evidence supporting acetazolamide as a well tolerated first-line therapy in IIH patients with mild vision loss. Recent studies have shown venous sinus stenting as a well tolerated and effective surgical alternative for patients with refractory IIH. SUMMARY: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a vision-threatening disorder that predominantly affects obese women of childbearing age. This disorder is becoming more prevalent as the obesity epidemic continues to increase. As our understanding of this disorder continues to evolve, diagnosis and management approaches have changed over time. However, the pathogenesis for IIH remains unclear. Several theories have been proposed, including abnormalities in cerebrospinal dynamics, metabolic causes and genetics. The diagnostic criteria are based on the revised Dandy criteria. Traditionally, treatment was based on clinical experiences and retrospective studies. However, a new, prospective, randomized, controlled trial, the IIHTT, provided evidence-based data to help guide medical therapy. Additionally new, prospective studies are underway for the different surgical alternatives to treat IIH.
Manoli I, Sysol JR, Epping MW, Li L, Wang C, Sloan JL, Pass A, Gagné J, Ktena YP, Li L, Trivedi NS, Ouattara B, Zerfas PM, Hoffmann V, Abu-Asab M, Tsokos MG, Kleiner DE, Garone C, Cusmano-Ozog K, Enns GM, Vernon HJ, Andersson HC, Grunewald S, Elkahloun AG, Girard CL, Schnermann J, DiMauro S, Andres-Mateos E, Vandenberghe LH, Chandler RJ, Venditti CP. FGF21 underlies a hormetic response to metabolic stress in methylmalonic acidemia. JCI Insight 2018;3(23)Abstract
Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA), an organic acidemia characterized by metabolic instability and multiorgan complications, is most frequently caused by mutations in methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT). To define the metabolic adaptations in MMA in acute and chronic settings, we studied a mouse model generated by transgenic expression of Mut in the muscle. Mut-/-;TgINS-MCK-Mut mice accurately replicate the hepatorenal mitochondriopathy and growth failure seen in severely affected patients and were used to characterize the response to fasting. The hepatic transcriptome in MMA mice was characterized by the chronic activation of stress-related pathways and an aberrant fasting response when compared with controls. A key metabolic regulator, Fgf21, emerged as a significantly dysregulated transcript in mice and was subsequently studied in a large patient cohort. The concentration of plasma FGF21 in MMA patients correlated with disease subtype, growth indices, and markers of mitochondrial dysfunction but was not affected by renal disease. Restoration of liver Mut activity, by transgenesis and liver-directed gene therapy in mice or liver transplantation in patients, drastically reduced plasma FGF21 and was associated with improved outcomes. Our studies identify mitocellular hormesis as a hepatic adaptation to metabolic stress in MMA and define FGF21 as a highly predictive disease biomarker.
Mansouri B, Roznik M, Rizzo JF, Prasad S. Rehabilitation of Visual Loss: Where We Are and Where We Need to Be. J Neuroophthalmol 2018;38(2):223-229.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Spontaneous recovery of visual loss resulting from injury to the brain is variable. A variety of traditional rehabilitative strategies, including the use of prisms or compensatory saccadic eye movements, have been used successfully to improve visual function and quality-of-life for patients with homonymous hemianopia. More recently, repetitive visual stimulation of the blind area has been reported to be of benefit in expanding the field of vision. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We performed a literature review with main focus on clinical studies spanning from 1963 to 2016, including 52 peer-reviewed articles, relevant cross-referenced citations, editorials, and reviews. RESULTS: Repetitive visual stimulation is reported to expand the visual field, although the interpretation of results is confounded by a variety of methodological factors and conflicting outcomes from different research groups. Many studies used subjective assessments of vision and did not include a sufficient number of subjects or controls. CONCLUSIONS: The available clinical evidence does not strongly support claims of visual restoration using repetitive visual stimulation beyond the time that spontaneous visual recovery might occur. This lack of firm supportive evidence does not preclude the potential of real benefit demonstrated in laboratories. Additional well-designed clinical studies with adequate controls and methods to record ocular fixation are needed.
Margeta MA, Lad EM, Proia AD. CD163+ macrophages infiltrate axon bundles of postmortem optic nerves with glaucoma. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2018;256(12):2449-2456.Abstract
PURPOSE: Prior research in animal models has shown that macrophages and microglia play an important role in pathogenesis of glaucoma, but the phenotype and distribution of macrophages in human glaucomatous tissue have not been sufficiently characterized. METHODS: We analyzed H&E, CD68-, and CD163-immunostained slides from 25 formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded autopsy eyes: 12 control eyes and 13 eyes with glaucoma. The diagnosis of glaucoma was made based on a history of glaucoma as reported in the medical record and histological changes characteristic of glaucoma. Glaucoma cases and controls were matched in terms of age, sex, and race. RESULTS: Qualitative analysis of the conventional outflow pathway and the optic nerve revealed that all eyes contained CD163+ cells but a negligible number of CD68+ cells. CD163+ macrophages infiltrated the trabecular meshwork and surrounded Schlemm's canal of normal eyes and eyes with glaucoma, but the pattern was variable and qualitatively similar between groups. In optic nerves of control eyes, CD163+ macrophages were present at low levels and restricted to septa between axon bundles. In glaucomatous optic nerves, the number of CD163+ cells was increased both qualitatively and quantitatively (glaucoma 5.1 ± 0.6 CD163+ cells/mm, control 2.5 ± 0.3 CD163+ cells/mm, p < 0.001), with CD163+ cells infiltrating axon bundles in cases of both mild and severe diseases. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in CD163+ cell number in eyes with mild and severe glaucoma is the first demonstration of macrophage infiltration in glaucomatous human optic nerves. This finding supports a role for macrophages in glaucoma pathogenesis and progression.
Marsh AP, Edwards TJ, Galea C, Cooper HM, Engle EC, Jamuar SS, Méneret A, Moutard M-L, Nava C, Rastetter A, Robinson G, Rouleau G, Roze E, Spencer-Smith M, Trouillard O, de Villemeur TB, Walsh CA, Yu TW, Yu TW, Heron D, Sherr EH, Richards LJ, Depienne C, Leventer RJ, Lockhart PJ. DCC mutation update: Congenital mirror movements, isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum, and developmental split brain syndrome. Hum Mutat 2018;39(1):23-39.Abstract
The deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) gene encodes the netrin-1 (NTN1) receptor DCC, a transmembrane protein required for the guidance of commissural axons. Germline DCC mutations disrupt the development of predominantly commissural tracts in the central nervous system (CNS) and cause a spectrum of neurological disorders. Monoallelic, missense, and predicted loss-of-function DCC mutations cause congenital mirror movements, isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), or both. Biallelic, predicted loss-of-function DCC mutations cause developmental split brain syndrome (DSBS). Although the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to disease remain poorly understood, they are thought to stem from reduced or perturbed NTN1 signaling. Here, we review the 26 reported DCC mutations associated with abnormal CNS development in humans, including 14 missense and 12 predicted loss-of-function mutations, and discuss their associated clinical characteristics and diagnostic features. We provide an update on the observed genotype-phenotype relationships of congenital mirror movements, isolated ACC and DSBS, and correlate this to our current understanding of the biological function of DCC in the development of the CNS. All mutations and their associated phenotypes were deposited into a locus-specific LOVD (https://databases.lovd.nl/shared/genes/DCC).
Maturi RK, Glassman AR, Liu D, Beck RW, Bhavsar AR, Bressler NM, Jampol LM, Melia M, Punjabi OS, Salehi-Had H, Sun JK, Sun JK. Effect of Adding Dexamethasone to Continued Ranibizumab Treatment in Patients With Persistent Diabetic Macular Edema: A DRCR Network Phase 2 Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Ophthalmol 2018;136(1):29-38.Abstract
Importance: Some eyes have persistent diabetic macular edema (DME) following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy for DME. Subsequently adding intravitreous corticosteroids to the treatment regimen might result in better outcomes than continued anti-VEGF therapy alone. Objective: To compare continued intravitreous ranibizumab alone with ranibizumab plus intravitreous dexamethasone implant in eyes with persistent DME. Design, Setting, and Participants: Phase 2 multicenter randomized clinical trial conducted at 40 US sites in 129 eyes from 116 adults with diabetes between February 2014 and December 2016. Eyes had persistent DME, with visual acuity of 20/32 to 20/320 after at least 3 anti-VEGF injections before a run-in phase, which included an additional 3 monthly 0.3-mg ranibizumab injections. Data analysis was according to intent to treat. Interventions: Following the run-in phase, study eyes that had persistent DME and were otherwise eligible were randomly assigned to receive 700 μg of dexamethasone (combination group, 65 eyes) or sham treatment (ranibizumab group, 64 eyes) in addition to continued 0.3-mg ranibizumab in both treatment arms as often as every 4 weeks based on a structured re-treatment protocol. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was change in mean visual acuity letter score at 24 weeks as measured by the electronic Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (E-ETDRS). The principal secondary outcome was change in mean central subfield thickness as measured with the use of optical coherence tomography. Results: Of the 116 randomized patients, median age was 65 years (interquartile range [IQR], 58-71 years); 50.9% were female and 60.3% were white. Mean (SD) improvement in visual acuity from randomization was 2.7 (9.8) letters in the combination group and 3.0 (7.1) letters in the ranibizumab group, with the adjusted treatment group difference (combination minus ranibizumab) of -0.5 letters (95% CI, -3.6 to 2.5; 2-sided P = .73). Mean (SD) change in central subfield thickness in the combination group was -110 (86) μm compared with -62 (97) μm for the ranibizumab group (adjusted difference, -52; 95% CI, -82 to -22; 2-sided P < .001). Nineteen eyes (29%) in the combination group experienced increased intraocular pressure or initiated treatment with antihypertensive eyedrops compared with 0 in the ranibizumab group (2-sided P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: Although its use is more likely to reduce retinal thickness and increase intraocular pressure, the addition of intravitreous dexamethasone to continued ranibizumab therapy does not improve visual acuity at 24 weeks more than continued ranibizumab therapy alone among eyes with persistent DME following anti-VEGF therapy. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01945866.
Maurer AC, Pacouret S, Cepeda Diaz AK, Blake J, Andres-Mateos E, Vandenberghe LH. The Assembly-Activating Protein Promotes Stability and Interactions between AAV's Viral Proteins to Nucleate Capsid Assembly. Cell Rep 2018;23(6):1817-1830.Abstract
The adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector is a preferred delivery platform for in vivo gene therapy. Natural and engineered variations of the AAV capsid affect a plurality of phenotypes relevant to gene therapy, including vector production and host tropism. Fundamental to these aspects is the mechanism of AAV capsid assembly. Here, the role of the viral co-factor assembly-activating protein (AAP) was evaluated in 12 naturally occurring AAVs and 9 putative ancestral capsid intermediates. The results demonstrate increased capsid protein stability and VP-VP interactions in the presence of AAP. The capsid's dependence on AAP can be partly overcome by strengthening interactions between monomers within the assembly, as illustrated by the transfer of a minimal motif defined by a phenotype-to-phylogeny mapping method. These findings suggest that the emergence of AAP within the Dependovirus genus relaxes structural constraints on AAV assembly in favor of increasing the degrees of freedom for the capsid to evolve.
Mauschitz MM, Bonnemaijer PWM, Diers K, Rauscher FG, Elze T, Engel C, Loeffler M, Colijn JM, Ikram AM, Vingerling JR, Williams KM, Hammond CJ, Creuzot-Garcher C, Bron AM, Silva R, Nunes S, Delcourt C, Cougnard-Grégoire A, Holz FG, Klaver CCW, Breteler MMB, Finger RP, Finger RP. Systemic and Ocular Determinants of Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measurements in the European Eye Epidemiology (E3) Population. Ophthalmology 2018;125(10):1526-1536.Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate systemic and ocular determinants of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (pRNFLT) in the European population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional meta-analysis. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 16 084 European adults from 8 cohort studies (mean age range, 56.9±12.3-82.1±4.2 years) of the European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium. METHODS: We examined associations with pRNFLT measured by spectral-domain OCT in each study using multivariable linear regression and pooled results using random effects meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Determinants of pRNFLT. RESULTS: Mean pRNFLT ranged from 86.8±21.4 μm in the Rotterdam Study I to 104.7±12.5 μm in the Rotterdam Study III. We found the following factors to be associated with reduced pRNFLT: Older age (β = -0.38 μm/year; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.57 to -0.18), higher intraocular pressure (IOP) (β = -0.36 μm/mmHg; 95% CI, -0.56 to -0.15), visual impairment (β = -5.50 μm; 95% CI, -9.37 to -1.64), and history of systemic hypertension (β = -0.54 μm; 95% CI, -1.01 to -0.07) and stroke (β = -1.94 μm; 95% CI, -3.17 to -0.72). A suggestive, albeit nonsignificant, association was observed for dementia (β = -3.11 μm; 95% CI, -6.22 to 0.01). Higher pRNFLT was associated with more hyperopic spherical equivalent (β = 1.39 μm/diopter; 95% CI, 1.19-1.59) and smoking (β = 1.53 μm; 95% CI, 1.00-2.06 for current smokers compared with never-smokers). CONCLUSIONS: In addition to previously described determinants such as age and refraction, we found that systemic vascular and neurovascular diseases were associated with reduced pRNFLT. These may be of clinical relevance, especially in glaucoma monitoring of patients with newly occurring vascular comorbidities.
McDermott AM, Baidouri H, Woodward AM, Kam WR, Liu Y, Chen X, Ziemanski JF, Vistisen K, Hazlett LD, Nichols KK, Argüeso P, Sullivan DA. Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Profiles of Commonly Used Human Ocular Surface Cell Lines. Curr Eye Res 2018;43(9):1097-1101.Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to establish the short tandem repeat (STR) profiles of several human cell lines commonly used in ocular surface research. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Independently DNA was extracted from multiple passages of three human corneal epithelial cell lines, two human conjunctival epithelial cell lines and one meibomian gland cell line, from different laboratories actively involved in ocular surface research. The samples were then subjected to STR analysis on a fee-for-service basis in an academic setting and the data compared against that in available databases. RESULTS: The STR profiles for the human corneal epithelial cells were different among the three cell lines studied and for each line the profiles were identical across the samples provided by three laboratories. Profiles for the human conjunctival epithelial cells were different among the two cell lines studied. Profiles for the meibomian gland cell line were identical across the samples provided by three laboratories. No samples were contaminated by elements of other cell lines such as HeLa. CONCLUSIONS: This comprehensive study provides verification of STR profiles for commonly used human ocular surface cell lines that can now be used as a reference by others in the field to authenticate the cell lines in use in their own laboratories.
McKay MK, Sobrin L. Choroidal Infiltrate of Unknown Cause. JAMA Ophthalmol 2018;
McLaurin E, Cavet ME, Gomes PJ, Ciolino JB. Brimonidine Ophthalmic Solution 0.025% for Reduction of Ocular Redness: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Optom Vis Sci 2018;95(3):264-271.Abstract
SIGNIFICANCE: The α2-adrenergic receptor agonist brimonidine has been reported to induce conjunctival blanching in cataract, strabismus, laser refractive, and filtration procedures. Clinicians are often faced with red eyes with no apparent underlying pathology. Low-dose brimonidine reduced ocular redness in such subjects with efficacy maintained over 1 month and negligible rebound redness. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic solution 0.025% for the treatment of ocular redness. METHODS: In this single-center, double-masked, phase 3 clinical trial, adult subjects with baseline redness of more than 1 unit in both eyes (0- to 4-unit scale) were randomized 2:1 to brimonidine 0.025% or vehicle. A single dose was administered in-office (day 1); thereafter subjects instilled treatment four times a day for 4 weeks, with clinic visits on days 15, 29, and 36 (7 days post-treatment). Efficacy end points included investigator-evaluated redness 5 to 240 minutes post-instillation on day 1 (primary); investigator-evaluated change from baseline 1, 360, and 480 minutes post-instillation on day 1, and 1 and 5 minutes post-instillation on days 15 and 29; total clearance of redness, and subject-assessed redness. Safety/tolerability measures included adverse events, rebound redness, and drop comfort. RESULTS: Sixty subjects were randomized (n = 40 brimonidine, n = 20 vehicle). Investigator-assessed redness was lower with brimonidine versus vehicle over the 5- to 240-minute post-instillation period (mean [SE], 0.62 [0.076] vs. 1.49 [0.108]; P < .0001) and at each time point within that period (P < .0001). At 1, 360, and 480 minutes post-instillation, respectively, the mean differences (95% confidence interval) between treatments were -0.73 (-1.05 to -0.41), -0.57 (-0.84 to -0.29), and -0.39 (-0.67 to -0.10), respectively. No tachyphylaxis was evident with brimonidine on days 15 and 29, and minimal rebound redness was observed following discontinuation. Adverse events were infrequent, and brimonidine was rated as very comfortable. CONCLUSIONS: Brimonidine 0.025% appeared safe and effective for reduction of ocular redness, with an 8-hour duration of action, no evidence of tachyphylaxis, and negligible rebound redness.
Meng W, Shah KP, Pollack S, Toppila I, Hebert HL, McCarthy MI, Groop L, Ahlqvist E, Lyssenko V, Agardh E, Daniell M, Kaidonis G, Craig JE, Mitchell P, Liew G, Kifley A, Wang JJ, Christiansen MW, Jensen RA, Penman A, Hancock HA, Chen CJ, Correa A, Kuo JZ, Li X, Chen Y, Rotter JI, Klein R, Klein B, Wong TY, Morris AD, Doney ASF, Colhoun HM, Price AL, Burdon KP, Groop PH, Sandholm N, Grassi MA, Sobrin L, Palmer CNA, markers for and hard endpoints for Innovative WTCCC (WTCCC2); SM-M-vascular2. A genome-wide association study suggests new evidence for an association of the NADPH Oxidase 4 (NOX4) gene with severe diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes. Acta Ophthalmol 2018;Sept 4Abstract

PURPOSE:

Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye complication in patients with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic factors contributing to severe diabetic retinopathy.

METHODS:

A genome-wide association approach was applied. In the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside Scotland (GoDARTS) datasets, cases of severe diabetic retinopathy were defined as type 2 diabetic patients who were ever graded as having severe background retinopathy (Level R3) or proliferative retinopathy (Level R4) in at least one eye according to the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Grading Scheme or who were once treated by laser photocoagulation. Controls were diabetic individuals whose longitudinal retinopathy screening records were either normal (Level R0) or only with mild background retinopathy (Level R1) in both eyes. Significant Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) were taken forward for meta-analysis using multiple Caucasian cohorts.

RESULTS:

Five hundred and sixty cases of type 2 diabetes with severe diabetic retinopathy and 4,106 controls were identified in the GoDARTS cohort. We revealed that rs3913535 in the NADPH Oxidase 4 (NOX4) gene reached a p value of 4.05 × 10-9 . Two nearby SNPs, rs10765219 and rs11018670 also showed promising p values (p values = 7.41 × 10-8 and 1.23 × 10-8 , respectively). In the meta-analysis using multiple Caucasian cohorts (excluding GoDARTS), rs10765219 and rs11018670 showed associations for diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.003 and 0.007, respectively), while the p value of rs3913535 was not significant (p = 0.429).

CONCLUSION:

This genome-wide association study of severe diabetic retinopathy suggests new evidence for the involvement of the NOX4 gene.

Micera A, Di Zazzo A, Esposito G, Longo R, Foulsham W, Sacco R, Sgrulletta R, Bonini S. Age-Related Changes to Human Tear Composition. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2018;59(5):2024-2031.Abstract
Purpose: We characterize age-associated alterations in the expression of inflammatory mediators and tissue remodeling factors in human tears. Methods: A total of 75 consecutive volunteers (32 male/44 female; 19-93 years) underwent clinical assessment of ocular surface status, ocular surface disease index (OSDI) grading and tear sampling. The volunteers were categorized into three groups: young (18-40 years), middle-aged (41-60 years), and old (>60 years). Total protein profiles and chip-based protein array evaluations were conducted to investigate the expression of 60 potential candidates, including pro-/anti-inflammatory mediators and tissue remodeling factors. Appropriate validations were performed using conventional assays. Multiple comparisons for regression between potential candidates and age were performed, as well as statistical analyses among the three age groups. Nonpooled samples were used for quantifications. Results: Pearson analysis of chip-arrays identified 9 of 60 potential candidates. Specifically, IL-8, IL-6, and regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES; P < 0.0083) protein as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, IL-3, and TNF-α (P < 0.05) correlated positively with aging. MIP-3β showed an opposite tendency. Western blot and ELISA analysis corroborated the array data. OSDI grading did not correlate with aging. Conclusions: Dynamic changes to tear protein profiles occur with aging. Our study identifies the expression of IL-8, IL-6, RANTES, MMP-1, and MIP-3β as increasing with age. These select inflammatory and matrix remodeling factors may be relevant to the development of novel diagnostic tools and therapeutics in the context of age-related ocular surface disease.
Miller JW, Vandenberghe LH. Breaking and Sealing Barriers in Retinal Gene Therapy. Mol Ther 2018;
Modjtahedi BS, Ferris FL, Hunter DG, Fong DS. Public Health Burden and Potential Interventions for Myopia. Ophthalmology 2018;125(5):628-630.
Moein H-R, Kheirkhah A, Muller RT, Cruzat AC, Pavan-Langston D, Hamrah P. Corneal nerve regeneration after herpes simplex keratitis: A longitudinal in vivo confocal microscopy study. Ocul Surf 2018;16(2):218-225.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the long-term alterations of corneal nerves in patients with herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis using in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). DESIGN: Prospective, longitudinal, cross sectional. METHODS: This study included 16 patients with a history of HSV keratitis and 15 age-matched normal controls. Slit-scanning IVCM was performed in all subjects at baseline and then after a mean follow-up of 37.3 ± 1.7 months in the patient group. Corneal subbasal nerve density and corneal sensation were compared between groups at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS: At baseline, the mean subbasal nerve density was significantly lower in both affected eyes (1.4 ± 0.6 mm/mm) and contralateral unaffected eyes (6.4 ± 0.7 mm/mm) compared with the controls (14.1 ± 1.6 mm/mm; all P < .001). At the end of follow-up, the mean nerve density in affected eyes increased to 2.8 ± 0.7 mm/mm (P = .006), with no significant change in contralateral unaffected eyes (6.5 ± 1.0 mm/mm, P = .72). However, both eyes had lower nerve density than controls (all P < .001). Corneal sensation was significantly lower in affected eyes (2.6 ± 0.6 cm) than in the control group (6.0 ± 0.0, P < .001) and showed no significant change at the end of follow-up (2.5 ± 0.6 cm, P = .80). Corneal sensation in contralateral unaffected eyes was not different in comparison with controls at both baseline and follow up (all p > .05). CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that although corneal nerve regeneration occurs in patients with HSV keratitis, this change is not clinically significant and does not results in changes of corneal sensation. Therefore, these patients need to be followed closely for complications of neurotrophic keratopathy and might benefit from neuro-regenerative therapies.
Momtazi L, Dartt DA, Nilsen O, Eidet JR. Molecular layer deposition builds biocompatible substrates for epithelial cells. J Biomed Mater Res A 2018;106(12):3090-3098.Abstract
The demand for novel biocompatible materials as surface coating in the field of regenerative medicine is high. We explored molecular layer deposition (MLD) technique for building surface coatings and introduced a new group of substrates consisting of amino acids, or nucleobases, and the biocompatible metal titanium. The substrates were built from titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) with l-lysine, glycine, l-aspartic acid, l-arginine, thymine, uracil, and adenine. Substrates based on zirconium chloride and terephthalic acid were also included. Titanium oxide (TiO ) substrates made by atomic layer deposition and uncoated cover slips served as controls. Rat conjunctival epithelial goblet cells were grown in RPMI 1640 and RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, cell attachment, proliferation, and viability were analyzed. Cells cultured on MLD and uncoated substrates were proliferating (positive for Ki67). Cell attachment after 3 h of culture on MLD substrates was similar to uncoated coverslips (p > 0.05). Compared to uncoated coverslips, cell proliferation assayed with alamarBlue® after 4 days was significantly higher on all MLD substrates (p < 0.05), whereas terephthalic acid-containing MLD substrates reduced proliferation (p < 0.01). Viability assessed by LIVE/DEAD® was high (>85%) for all substrates after 5 days. The novel MLD technique is promising for building biocompatible substrates that direct epithelial cell growth. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 3090-3098, 2018.
Moos WH, Faller DV, Glavas IP, Harpp DN, Irwin MH, Kanara I, Pinkert CA, Powers WR, Steliou K, Vavvas DG, Kodukula K. A New Approach to Treating Neurodegenerative Otologic Disorders. Biores Open Access 2018;7(1):107-115.Abstract
Hearing loss, the most common neurological disorder and the fourth leading cause of years lived with disability, can have profound effects on quality of life. The impact of this "invisible disability," with significant consequences, economic and personal, is most substantial in low- and middle-income countries, where >80% of affected people live. Given the importance of hearing for communication, enjoyment, and safety, with up to 500 million affected globally at a cost of nearly $800 billion/year, research on new approaches toward prevention and treatment is attracting increased attention. The consequences of noise pollution are largely preventable, but irreversible hearing loss can result from aging, disease, or drug side effects. Once damage occurs, treatment relies on hearing aids and cochlear implants. Preventing, delaying, or reducing some degree of hearing loss may be possible by avoiding excessive noise and addressing major contributory factors such as cardiovascular risk. However, given the magnitude of the problem, these interventions alone are unlikely to be sufficient. Recent advances in understanding principal mechanisms that govern hearing function, together with new drug discovery paradigms designed to identify efficacious therapies, bode well for pharmaceutical intervention. This review surveys various causes of loss of auditory function and discusses potential neurological underpinnings, including mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria mitigate cell protection, survival, and function and may succumb to cumulative degradation of energy production and performance; the end result is cell death. Energy-demanding neurons and vestibulocochlear hair cells are vulnerable to mitochondrial dysfunction, and hearing impairment and deafness are characteristic of neurodegenerative mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Beyond acting as cellular powerhouses, mitochondria regulate immune responses to infections, and studies of this phenomenon have aided in identifying nuclear factor kappa B and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element signaling as targets for discovery of otologic drugs, respectively, suppressing or upregulating these pathways. Treatment with free radical scavenging antioxidants is one therapeutic approach, with lipoic acid and corresponding carnitine esters exhibiting improved biodistribution and other features showing promise. These compounds are also histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, adding epigenetic modulation to the mechanistic milieu through which they act. These data suggest that new drugs targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and modulating epigenetic pathways via HDAC inhibition or other mechanisms hold great promise.
Moussa K, Shantha J, Schallhorn JM. Blurry Vision and Eye Pain After Pterygium Surgery. JAMA Ophthalmol 2018;136(7):827-828.
Moustafa GA, Borkar DS, McKay MK, Eton EA, Koulisis N, Lorch AC, Kloek CE, Kloek CE. Outcomes in resident-performed cataract surgeries with iris challenges: Results from the Perioperative Care for Intraocular Lens study. J Cataract Refract Surg 2018;44(12):1469-1477.Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess the outcomes of resident-performed cataract surgeries with iris challenges and to compare these outcomes with similar surgeries performed by attending surgeons. SETTING: Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. METHODS: All cases of cataract extraction by phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation, performed by comprehensive ophthalmologists between January 1 and December 31, 2014, were reviewed. Cases with preoperative or intraoperative miosis, iris prolapse, and intraoperative floppy iris syndrome, were included for analysis. Visual outcomes and the rate of perioperative adverse events were compared between resident and attending surgeon cases. Factors predicting adverse events were also assessed. RESULTS: In total, 1931 eye cases of 1434 patients were reviewed, and 65 resident cases and 168 attending surgeon cases were included. The mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution corrected distance visual acuity was better in the resident group 1 month after surgery (0.051 ± 0.10 [SD] versus 0.132 ± 0.30, P = .03); however, the difference was eliminated when controlling for macular disease. The mean operative time was 43.8 ± 26.5 minutes and 30.9 ± 12.6 minutes for cases performed by resident surgeons and attending surgeons, respectively (P  .0001). Residents utilized supplemental pharmacologic dilation or retraction more frequently than attending surgeons (98% versus 87% of cases, P = .008). The overall rate of adverse events was no different between residents and attending surgeons (P = 0.16). Dense nuclear sclerosis predicted adverse events in cataract cases with iris challenges (adjusted odds ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.94; P = .001). CONCLUSION: Although requiring longer operative times and more surgical manipulation, residents who performed cataract surgeries with iris challenges achieved outcomes comparable to those performed by attending surgeons, and residents should be given the opportunity to operate on these eyes.

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