2019

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Chirapapaisan C, Abbouda A, Jamali A, Müller RT, Cavalcanti BM, Colon C, Witkin D, Sahin A, Dana R, Cruzat A, Hamrah P. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy Demonstrates Increased Immune Cell Densities in Corneal Graft Rejection Correlating With Signs and Symptoms. Am J Ophthalmol 2019;203:26-36.Abstract
PURPOSE: Diagnosis of graft rejection is based on patient symptoms and on clinical signs detected by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. This study investigated whether laser in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) can aid in the diagnosis of corneal graft rejection by detecting cellular corneal changes that take place after transplantation. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SUBJECTS: Thirty-eight eyes of 38 patients with penetrating keratoplasty (15 eyes with corneal graft rejection, 23 eyes without rejection) and 9 age-matched normal controls. METHODS: Laser IVCM was performed in the corneal grafts centrally. The density of immune cells (IC) was assessed for epithelial, sub-epithelial, stromal, and endothelial layers by 2 masked observers. IC density was compared among different groups and correlated to clinical signs and symptoms of corneal graft rejection. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Outcome measurement was the IC density in the corneal layers and its associations with the presence of clinical signs and symptoms of corneal graft rejection. RESULTS: The IC density was significantly different between rejected and non-rejected grafts (P = 0.004) and different from that of normal controls (P = 0.001). Among corneal layers, IC density was significantly higher in rejected grafts than in non-rejected grafts in only the sub-basal (611.54 ± 573.74 vs. 340.61 ± 268.60 cells/mm, respectively; P = 0.049) and endothelial layers (250.62 ± 267.13 vs. 103.47 ± 81.91 cells/mm, respectively; P = 0.001). Patients with decreased best corrected visual acuity, Khodadoust line, and anterior chamber cells demonstrated a significant increase in total IC density (P < 0.05), whereas patients with symptoms of irritation, light sensitivity, and pain revealed a specific increase in IC density in the sub-basal layer (P < 0.05). Patients with ocular pain had higher IC density in the epithelial layer than those without pain (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with corneal graft rejection demonstrate a significant increase in corneal immune cells, particularly, in the sub-basal and endothelial layers compared to patients with non-rejected grafts and controls. Although symptoms associated with endothelial rejection demonstrate a general increase in IC, pain, irritation, and light sensitivity are associated with increased IC in the sub-basal layer. Assessment of patients with corneal graft rejection by IVCM may serve as an adjunctive tool in the diagnosis and management of corneal graft rejection.
Chitnis GD, Verma MKS, Lamazouade J, Gonzalez-Andrades M, Yang K, Dergham A, Jones PA, Mead BE, Cruzat A, Tong Z, Martyn K, Solanki A, Landon-Brace N, Karp JM. A resistance-sensing mechanical injector for the precise delivery of liquids to target tissue. Nat Biomed Eng 2019;3(8):621-631.Abstract
The precision of the delivery of therapeutics to the desired injection site by syringes and hollow needles typically depends on the operator. Here, we introduce a highly sensitive, completely mechanical and cost-effective injector for targeting tissue reliably and precisely. As the operator pushes the syringe plunger, the injector senses the loss-of-resistance on encountering a softer tissue or a cavity, stops advancing the needle and delivers the payload. We demonstrate that the injector can reliably deliver liquids to the suprachoroidal space-a challenging injection site that provides access to the back of the eye-for a wide range of eye sizes, scleral thicknesses and intraocular pressures, and target sites relevant for epidural injections, subcutaneous injections and intraperitoneal access. The design of this simple and effective injector can be adapted for a broad variety of clinical applications.
Cho S, Kang J. Dissociation kinetics of TAPBPR-MHC class I complex. Mol Immunol 2019;114:661-662.
Chung DC, Bertelsen M, Lorenz B, Pennesi ME, Leroy BP, Hamel CP, Pierce E, Sallum J, Larsen M, Stieger K, Preising M, Weleber R, Yang P, Place E, Liu E, Schaefer G, DiStefano-Pappas J, Elci OU, McCague S, Wellman JA, High KA, Reape KZ. The Natural History of Inherited Retinal Dystrophy Due to Biallelic Mutations in the RPE65 Gene. Am J Ophthalmol 2019;199:58-70.Abstract
PURPOSE: To delineate the natural history of visual parameters over time in individuals with biallelic RPE65 mutation-associated inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD); describe the range of causative mutations; determine potential genotype/phenotype relationships; and describe the variety of clinical diagnoses. DESIGN: Global, multicenter, retrospective chart review. METHODS: Study Population: Seventy individuals with biallelic RPE65 mutation-associated IRD. PROCEDURES: Data were extracted from patient charts. MEASUREMENTS: Visual acuity (VA), Goldmann visual field (GVF), optical coherence tomography, color vision testing, light sensitivity testing, and electroretinograms (retinal imaging and fundus photography were collected and analyzed when available). RESULTS: VA decreased with age in a nonlinear, positive-acceleration relationship (P < .001). GVF decreased with age (P < .0001 for both V4e and III4e), with faster GVF decrease for III4e stimulus vs V4e (P = .0114, left eye; P = .0076, right eye). On average, a 1-year increase in age decreased III4e GVF by ∼25 sum total degrees in each eye while V4e GVF decreased by ∼37 sum total degrees in each eye, although individual variability was observed. A total of 78 clinical diagnoses and 56 unique RPE65 mutations were recorded, without discernible RPE65 mutation genotype/phenotype relationships. CONCLUSIONS: The number of clinical diagnoses and lack of a consistent RPE65 mutation-to-phenotype correlation underscore the need for genetic testing. Significant relationships between age and worsening VA and GVF highlight the progressive loss of functional retina over time. These data may have implications for optimal timing of treatment for IRD attributable to biallelic RPE65 mutations.
Coco G, Amparo F, Patel SP, Foulsham W, Carreno-Galeano JT, Stockslager SG, Ciolino JB, Yin J, Dana R. Oral guaifenesin for treatment of filamentary keratitis: A pilot study. Ocul Surf 2019;Abstract
PURPOSE: Pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of oral guaifenesin in reducing the signs and symptoms of filamentary keratitis. METHODS: Prospective, uncontrolled open-label pilot study. Twelve patients with non-Sjögren dry eye disease (DED) and secondary filamentary keratitis received treatment with oral guaifenesin 600 mg twice a day (total dose of 1.2 g/day) for 4 weeks. Adverse events, change in the number of corneal filaments, corneal fluorescein staining (CFS; NEI grading system), and symptoms (Ocular Surface Disease Index) were assessed. RESULTS: Before starting oral guaifenesin, all patients were on topical medical therapy for their condition. At baseline, the mean number of filaments was 5.8 ± 2.9, CFS score 7.3 ± 3.2, and OSDI score 55.6 ± 25. After 4 weeks of treatment, the number of filaments was 2.1 ± 2.2 (p = 0.04 vs. baseline), CFS score 6.5 ± 3.1 (p = 0.5), and OSDI score 46.1 ± 30.9 (p = 0.2). One patient discontinued the medication due to gastrointestinal side effects. CONCLUSIONS: Oral guaifenesin was safe and generally well tolerated, and demonstrated modest efficacy in reducing the severity of filamentary keratitis. These results should be considered preliminary; however, placebo-controlled investigations would be justified to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of oral guaifenesin as a mucolytic in treatment of filamentary keratitis.
Coco G, Kheirkhah A, Foulsham W, Dana R, Ciolino JB. Keratoconus progression associated with hormone replacement therapy. Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2019;15:100519.Abstract
Purpose: To report a postmenopausal patient with keratoconus who experienced significant progression after using hormone replacement therapy. Observations: A 51-year-old woman with previously stable keratoconus presented with acute disease progression following hormone replacement therapy in the context of prophylactic hysterectomy and bilateral ovariosalpingectomy. Over a 14-month period after starting hormone therapy, the steepest K increased from 63.7D to 71.5D in the right eye and from 65.8D to 78.1D in the left eye. Conclusions: Hormone replacement therapy may amplify progression of keratoconus.
Cohen LM, Shaye DA, Yoon MK. Isolated Orbital Floor Fracture Management: A Survey and Comparison of American Oculofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon Preferences. Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr 2019;12(2):112-121.Abstract
This article aimed to characterize, compare, and contrast the management of isolated orbital floor fractures among oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons in the United States. An anonymous 17-question multiple-choice web-based survey was distributed to all 590 members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) and all 1,300 members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) using each society's email database from November 2016 to January 2017. Two-hundred twenty-five oculofacial and 135 facial plastic surgeons completed the survey. The most important indications for surgery among both oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons were motility restriction, enophthalmos, and diplopia at 2 weeks. The most common preferred time to surgical intervention was 8 to 14 days; however, facial plastic surgeons were more likely to operate after 4 to 7 days (  < 0.001). The most common choices of orbital implant material were porous polyethylene and porous polyethylene plus titanium for both oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons, nylon for oculofacial surgeons, and titanium for facial plastic surgeons. The majority rarely/never used intraoperative computed tomography imaging or navigation. Facial plastic surgeons were more likely to perform postoperative imaging (  < 0.001). We report results of the first survey of isolated orbital floor fracture management among oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons in the United States. This survey characterizes practice patterns and areas of similarities/differences among oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons in the management of isolated orbital floor fractures, which may help define the current standard of care.
of in of Consortium GGPAD (GGLAD), Hauser MA, Allingham RR, Aung T, Van Der Heide CJ, Taylor KD, Rotter JI, Wang S-HJ, Bonnemaijer PWM, Williams SE, Abdullahi SM, Abu-Amero KK, Anderson MG, Akafo S, Alhassan MB, Asimadu I, Ayyagari R, Bakayoko S, Nyamsi PB, Bowden DW, Bromley WC, Budenz DL, Carmichael TR, Challa P, Chen Y-DI, Chuka-Okosa CM, Cooke Bailey JN, Costa VP, Cruz DA, DuBiner H, Ervin JF, Feldman RM, Flamme-Wiese M, Gaasterland DE, Garnai SJ, Girkin CA, Guirou N, Guo X, Haines JL, Hammond CJ, Herndon L, Hoffmann TJ, Hulette CM, Hydara A, Igo RP, Jorgenson E, Kabwe J, Kilangalanga NJ, Kizor-Akaraiwe N, Kuchtey RW, Lamari H, Li Z, Liebmann JM, Liu Y, Loos RJF, Melo MB, Moroi SE, Msosa JM, Mullins RF, Nadkarni G, Napo A, Ng MCY, Nunes HF, Obeng-Nyarkoh E, Okeke A, Okeke S, Olaniyi O, Olawoye O, Oliveira MB, Pasquale LR, Perez-Grossmann RA, Pericak-Vance MA, Qin X, Ramsay M, Resnikoff S, Richards JE, Schimiti RB, Sim KS, Sponsel WE, Svidnicki PV, Thiadens AAHJ, Uche NJ, van Duijn CM, de Vasconcellos JPC, Wiggs JL, Zangwill LM, Risch N, Milea D, Ashaye A, Klaver CCW, Weinreb RN, Ashley Koch AE, Fingert JH, Khor CC. Association of Genetic Variants With Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Among Individuals With African Ancestry. JAMA 2019;322(17):1682-1691.Abstract
Importance: Primary open-angle glaucoma presents with increased prevalence and a higher degree of clinical severity in populations of African ancestry compared with European or Asian ancestry. Despite this, individuals of African ancestry remain understudied in genomic research for blinding disorders. Objectives: To perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of African ancestry populations and evaluate potential mechanisms of pathogenesis for loci associated with primary open-angle glaucoma. Design, Settings, and Participants: A 2-stage GWAS with a discovery data set of 2320 individuals with primary open-angle glaucoma and 2121 control individuals without primary open-angle glaucoma. The validation stage included an additional 6937 affected individuals and 14 917 unaffected individuals using multicenter clinic- and population-based participant recruitment approaches. Study participants were recruited from Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, the United States, Tanzania, Britain, Cameroon, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Morocco, Peru, and Mali from 2003 to 2018. Individuals with primary open-angle glaucoma had open iridocorneal angles and displayed glaucomatous optic neuropathy with visual field defects. Elevated intraocular pressure was not included in the case definition. Control individuals had no elevated intraocular pressure and no signs of glaucoma. Exposures: Genetic variants associated with primary open-angle glaucoma. Main Outcomes and Measures: Presence of primary open-angle glaucoma. Genome-wide significance was defined as P < 5 × 10-8 in the discovery stage and in the meta-analysis of combined discovery and validation data. Results: A total of 2320 individuals with primary open-angle glaucoma (mean [interquartile range] age, 64.6 [56-74] years; 1055 [45.5%] women) and 2121 individuals without primary open-angle glaucoma (mean [interquartile range] age, 63.4 [55-71] years; 1025 [48.3%] women) were included in the discovery GWAS. The GWAS discovery meta-analysis demonstrated association of variants at amyloid-β A4 precursor protein-binding family B member 2 (APBB2; chromosome 4, rs59892895T>C) with primary open-angle glaucoma (odds ratio [OR], 1.32 [95% CI, 1.20-1.46]; P = 2 × 10-8). The association was validated in an analysis of an additional 6937 affected individuals and 14 917 unaffected individuals (OR, 1.15 [95% CI, 1.09-1.21]; P < .001). Each copy of the rs59892895*C risk allele was associated with increased risk of primary open-angle glaucoma when all data were included in a meta-analysis (OR, 1.19 [95% CI, 1.14-1.25]; P = 4 × 10-13). The rs59892895*C risk allele was present at appreciable frequency only in African ancestry populations. In contrast, the rs59892895*C risk allele had a frequency of less than 0.1% in individuals of European or Asian ancestry. Conclusions and Relevance: In this genome-wide association study, variants at the APBB2 locus demonstrated differential association with primary open-angle glaucoma by ancestry. If validated in additional populations this finding may have implications for risk assessment and therapeutic strategies.
Costela FM, Woods RL. When Watching Video, Many Saccades Are Curved and Deviate From a Velocity Profile Model. Front Neurosci 2018;12:960.Abstract
Commonly, saccades are thought to be ballistic eye movements, not modified during flight, with a straight path and a well-described velocity profile. However, they do not always follow a straight path and studies of saccade curvature have been reported previously. In a prior study, we developed a real-time, saccade-trajectory prediction algorithm to improve the updating of gaze-contingent displays and found that saccades with a curved path or that deviated from the expected velocity profile were not well fit by our saccade-prediction algorithm (velocity-profile deviation), and thus had larger updating errors than saccades that had a straight path and had a velocity profile that was fit well by the model. Further, we noticed that the curved saccades and saccades with high velocity-profile deviations were more common than we had expected when participants performed a natural-viewing task. Since those saccades caused larger display updating errors, we sought a better understanding of them. Here we examine factors that could affect curvature and velocity profile of saccades using a pool of 218,744 saccades from 71 participants watching "Hollywood" video clips. Those factors included characteristics of the participants (e.g., age), of the videos (importance of faces for following the story, genre), of the saccade (e.g., magnitude, direction), time during the session (e.g., fatigue) and presence and timing of scene cuts. While viewing the video clips, saccades were most likely horizontal or vertical over oblique. Measured curvature and velocity-profile deviation had continuous, skewed frequency distributions. We used mixed-effects regression models that included cubic terms and found a complex relationship between curvature, velocity-profile deviation and saccade duration (or magnitude). Curvature and velocity-profile deviation were related to some video-dependent features such as lighting, face presence, or nature and human figure content. Time during the session was a predictor for velocity profile deviations. Further, we found a relationship for saccades that were in flight at the time of a scene cut to have higher velocity-profile deviations and lower curvature in univariable models. Saccades characteristics vary with a variety of factors, which suggests complex interactions between oculomotor control and scene content that could be explored further.
Costela FM, Woods RL. A free database of eye movements watching "Hollywood" videoclips. Data Brief 2019;25:103991.Abstract
The provided database of tracked eye movements was collected using an infra-red, video-camera Eyelink 1000 system, from 95 participants as they viewed 'Hollywood' video clips. There are 206 clips of 30-s and eleven clips of 30-min for a total viewing time of about 60 hours. The database also provides the raw 30-s video clip files, a short preview of the 30-min clips, and subjective ratings of the content of the videos for each in categories: (1) genre; (2) importance of human faces; (3) importance of human figures; (4) importance of man-made objects; (5) importance of nature; (6) auditory information; (7) lighting; and (8) environment type. Precise timing of the scene cuts within the clips and the democratic gaze scanpath position (center of interest) per frame are provided. At this time, this eye-movement dataset has the widest age range (22-85 years) and is the third largest (in recorded video viewing time) of those that have been made available to the research community. The data-acquisition procedures are described, along with participant demographics, summaries of some common eye-movement statistics, and highlights of research topics in which the database was used. The dataset is freely available in the Open Science Framework repository (link in the manuscript) and can be used without restriction for educational and research purposes, providing that this paper is cited in any published work.
Costela FM, Saunders DR, Rose DJ, Katjezovic S, Reeves SM, Woods RL. People With Central Vision Loss Have Difficulty Watching Videos. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2019;60(1):358-364.Abstract
Purpose: People with central vision loss (CVL) often report difficulties watching video. We objectively evaluated the ability to follow the story (using the information acquisition method). Methods: Subjects with CVL (n = 23) or normal vision (NV, n = 60) described the content of 30-second video clips from movies and documentaries. We derived an objective information acquisition (IA) score for each response using natural-language processing. To test whether the impact of CVL was simply due to reduced resolution, another group of NV subjects (n = 15) described video clips with defocus blur that reduced visual acuity to 20/50 to 20/800. Mixed models included random effects correcting for differences between subjects and between the clips, with age, gender, cognitive status, and education as covariates. Results: Compared to both NV groups, IA scores were worse for the CVL group (P < 0.001). IA reduced with worsening visual acuity (P < 0.001), and the reduction with worsening visual acuity was greater for the CVL group than the NV-defocus group (P = 0.01), which was seen as a greater discrepancy at worse levels of visual acuity. Conclusions: The IA method was able to detect difficulties in following the story experienced by people with CVL. Defocus blur failed to recreate the CVL experience. IA is likely to be useful for evaluations of the effects of vision rehabilitation.
Cousins CC, Chou JC, Greenstein SH, Brauner SC, Shen LQ, Turalba AV, Houlihan P, Ritch R, Wiggs JL, Knepper PA, Pasquale LR. Resting nailfold capillary blood flow in primary open-angle glaucoma. Br J Ophthalmol 2019;103(2):203-207.Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: An altered haemodynamic profile for various ocular posterior segment capillary beds has been documented in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). POAG may also involve abnormal non-ocular blood flow, and the nailfold capillaries, which are not affected by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), are readily assessable. METHODS: We measured resting nailfold capillary blood flow in 67 POAG and 63 control subjects using video capillaroscopy. Masked readers tracked blood column voids between consecutive, registered image sequence frames, measured vessel diameter and calculated blood flow. We used multiple logistic regression to investigate the relation between nailfold capillary blood flow and POAG. In secondary analyses, we stratified cases by maximum IOP and concurrent topical beta-blocker use. RESULTS: Mean (±SD) blood flow in picolitres per second was 26.8±17.6 for POAG cases and 50.1±24.2 for controls (p<0.0001). After adjustment for demographic and clinical factors including blood pressure and pulse, every picolitre per second increase in resting nailfold blood flow was associated with a 6% (95% CI 0.92 to 0.96) reduced odds of POAG (p<0.0001). Similar relations between nailfold capillary blood flow and POAG were found for cases stratified by maximum known IOP and for cases stratified by concurrent topical beta-blocker use. CONCLUSION: Reduced resting nailfold capillary blood flow is present in POAG independent of covariates such as blood pressure, pulse and IOP.
Crotty GF, Chwalisz BK. Ocular motor manifestations of movement disorders. Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2019;30(6):443-448.Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Impaired eye movements are frequently seen in ophthalmic and neurologic clinical practice, especially in individuals with movement disorders. Identification of the abnormal movement can aid initial diagnosis and improve understanding of the underlying disease pathophysiology. The present article reviews the ocular motor manifestations and recent research on them in common movement disorders. RECENT FINDINGS: Ocular motor manifestations and their pathophysiologic correlates are being defined. In particular, study of eye movements can help clarify the changing clinicopathologic spectrum of atypical parkinsonian disorders. The pathophysiology and natural history of blepharospasm are being elucidated. Recent research focuses on high-resolution imaging and other technological advances to improve the sensitivity of the ocular motility exam. Eye movements are being studied as biomarkers for diagnosis and progression in clinical care and trials. SUMMARY: The current review summarizes ocular motor manifestations in common movement disorders, and presents recent research investigating their cause and treatment.
Cui Y, Zhu Y, Wang JC, Lu Y, Zeng R, Katz R, Wu DM, Vavvas DG, Husain D, Miller JW, Kim LA, Miller JB. Imaging Artifacts and Segmentation Errors With Wide-Field Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Diabetic Retinopathy. Transl Vis Sci Technol 2019;8(6):18.Abstract
Purpose: To analyze imaging artifacts and segmentation errors with wide-field swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA) in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational study at Massachusetts Eye and Ear from December 2018 to March 2019. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), diabetic patients with no diabetic retinopathy (DR), and healthy control eyes were included. All patients were imaged with a SS-OCTA and the Montage Angio (15 × 9 mm) was used for analysis. Images were independently evaluated by two graders using the motion artifact score (MAS). All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 25.0 and R software. Results: One hundred thirty-six eyes in 98 participants with the montage image were included in the study. Patients with more severe stages of DR had higher MAS by trend test analysis ( < 0.05). The occurrence of segmentation error was 0% in the healthy group, 10.53% in the no DR group, 10.00% in the NPDR group, and 50% in the PDR group. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the severity of DR and dry eye were the major factors affecting MAS ( < 0.05). There were some modifiable artifacts that could be corrected to improve image quality. Conclusions: Wide field SS-OCTA assesses retinal microvascular changes by noninvasive techniques, yet distinguishing real alterations from artifacts is paramount to accurate interpretations. DR severity and dry eye correlated with MAS. Translational Relevance: Understanding contributing factors and methods to reduce artifacts is critical to routine use and clinical trial with wide-field SS-OCTA.
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Dabul ANG, Avaca-Crusca JS, Navais RB, Merlo TP, Van Tyne D, Gilmore MS, da Camargo ILBC. Molecular basis for the emergence of a new hospital endemic tigecycline-resistant Enterococcus faecalis ST103 lineage. Infect Genet Evol 2019;67:23-32.Abstract
Enterococcus faecalis are a major cause of nosocomial infection worldwide, and the spread of vancomycin resistant strains (VRE) limits treatment options. Tigecycline-resistant VRE began to be isolated from inpatients at a Brazilian hospital within months following the addition of tigecycline to the hospital formulary. This was found to be the result of a spread of an ST103 E. faecalis clone. Our objective was to identify the basis for tigecycline resistance in this lineage. The genomes of two closely related tigecycline-susceptible (MIC = 0.06 mg/L), and three representative tigecycline-resistant (MIC = 1 mg/L) ST103 isolates were sequenced and compared. Further, efforts were undertaken to recapitulate the emergence of resistant strains in vitro. The specific mutations identified in clinical isolates in several cases were within the same genes identified in laboratory-evolved strains. The contribution of various polymorphisms to the resistance phenotype was assessed by trans-complementation of the wild type or mutant alleles, by testing for differences in mRNA abundance, and/or by examining the phenotype of transposon insertion mutants. Among tigecycline-resistant clinical isolates, five genes contained non-synonymous mutations, including two genes known to be related to enterococcal tigecycline resistance (tetM and rpsJ). Finally, within the in vitro-selected resistant variants, mutation in the gene for a MarR-family response regulator was associated with tigecycline resistance. This study shows that E. faecalis mutates to attain tigecycline resistance through the complex interplay of multiple mechanisms, along multiple evolutionary trajectories.
Dagi FT, Dagi LR. Commentary: Ernest Codman and the Impact of Quality Improvement in Neurosurgery: A Century Since the Idea of the "End Result". Neurosurgery 2019;84(2):E120-E121.
Dana R, Bradley JL, Guerin A, Pivneva I, Stillman IÖ, Evans AM, Schaumberg DA. Estimated Prevalence and Incidence of Dry Eye Disease Based on Coding Analysis of a Large, All-age United States Health Care System. Am J Ophthalmol 2019;202:47-54.Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess overall prevalence, annual prevalence, and incidence of dry eye disease (DED) in a large, representative population in the United States. DESIGN: Prevalence and incidence study. METHODS: Retrospective analysis using the Department of Defense (DOD) Military Health System (MHS) data on beneficiary medical claims from United States DOD military and civilian facilities, January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2015. PATIENT POPULATION: Using an algorithm, medical diagnostic codes indicative of DED and prescriptions for cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion identified a DED population from 9.7 million MHS beneficiaries (DOD service members, retirees, and dependents, aged 2-80+ years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: DED overall prevalence (2003-2015), annual prevalence (2005-2012), and annual incidence (2008-2012) stratified by sex, age group, and International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Ninth Revision diagnosis code grouping. RESULTS: DED prevalence was 5.28% overall, 7.78% among female beneficiaries, 2.96% among male beneficiaries and increased with age from 0.20% for ages 2-17 years, to 11.66% for individuals aged 50+ years. Annual prevalence increased from 0.8% to 3.0% overall, from 1.4% to 4.5% in female beneficiaries, and from 0.3% to 1.6% in male beneficiaries. Annual prevalence increased across age groups starting at age 18-39, 0.1%-0.6%, to age 50+, 1.8%-6.0%. Annual incidence increased from 0.6% to 0.9% overall, from 0.8% to 1.2% in female beneficiaries, and from 0.3% to 0.6% in male beneficiaries. Across age groups, annual incidence increased starting at age 18-39 (0.2%-0.3%), to age 50+ (1.0%-1.6%). CONCLUSIONS: DED overall prevalence, annual prevalence, and incidence were found to increase over time for all demographics. These findings highlight the continued importance of research and therapeutic development for this common condition.
Dehghan S, Seto J, Liu EB, Ismail AM, Madupu R, Heim A, Jones MS, Dyer DW, Chodosh J, Seto D. A Zoonotic Adenoviral Human Pathogen Emerged through Genomic Recombination among Human and Nonhuman Simian Hosts. J Virol 2019;93(18)Abstract
Genomics analysis of a historically intriguing and predicted emergent human adenovirus (HAdV) pathogen, which caused pneumonia and death, provides insight into a novel molecular evolution pathway involving "ping-pong" zoonosis and anthroponosis. The genome of this promiscuous pathogen is embedded with evidence of unprecedented multiple, multidirectional, stable, and reciprocal cross-species infections of hosts from three species (human, chimpanzee, and bonobo). This recombinant genome, typed as HAdV-B76, is identical to two recently reported simian AdV (SAdV) genomes isolated from chimpanzees and bonobos. Additionally, the presence of a critical adenoviral replication element found in HAdV genomes, in addition to genes that are highly similar to counterparts in other HAdVs, reinforces its potential as a human pathogen. Reservoirs in nonhuman hosts may explain periods of apparent absence and then reemergence of human adenoviral pathogens, as well as present pathways for the genesis of those thought to be newly emergent. The nature of the HAdV-D76 genome has implications for the use of SAdVs as gene delivery vectors in human gene therapy and vaccines, selected to avoid preexisting and potentially fatal host immune responses to HAdV. An emergent adenoviral human pathogen, HAdV-B76, associated with a fatality in 1965, shows a remarkable degree of genome identity with two recently isolated simian adenoviruses that contain cross-species genome recombination events from three hosts: human, chimpanzee, and bonobo. Zoonosis (nonhuman-to-human transmission) and anthroponosis (human to nonhuman transmission) may play significant roles in the emergence of human adenoviral pathogens.
Deiner MS, McLeod SD, Wong J, Chodosh J, Lietman TM, Porco TC. Google Searches and Detection of Conjunctivitis Epidemics Worldwide. Ophthalmology 2019;126(9):1219-1229.Abstract
PURPOSE: Epidemic and seasonal infectious conjunctivitis outbreaks can impact education, workforce, and economy adversely. Yet conjunctivitis typically is not a reportable disease, potentially delaying mitigating intervention. Our study objective was to determine if conjunctivitis epidemics could be identified using Google Trends search data. DESIGN: Search data for conjunctivitis-related and control search terms from 5 years and countries worldwide were obtained. Country and term were masked. Temporal scan statistics were applied to identify candidate epidemics. Candidates then were assessed for geotemporal concordance with an a priori defined collection of known reported conjunctivitis outbreaks, as a measure of sensitivity. PARTICIPANTS: Populations by country that searched Google's search engine using our study terms. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Percent of known conjunctivitis outbreaks also found in the same country and period by our candidate epidemics, identified from conjunctivitis-related searches. RESULTS: We identified 135 candidate conjunctivitis epidemic periods from 77 countries. Compared with our a priori defined collection of known reported outbreaks, candidate conjunctivitis epidemics identified 18 of 26 (69% sensitivity) of the reported country-wide or island nationwide outbreaks, or both; 9 of 20 (45% sensitivity) of the reported region or district-wide outbreaks, or both; but far fewer nosocomial and reported smaller outbreaks. Similar overall and individual sensitivity, as well as specificity, were found on a country-level basis. We also found that 83% of our candidate epidemics had start dates before (of those, 20% were more than 12 weeks before) their concurrent reported outbreak's report issuance date. Permutation tests provided evidence that on average, conjunctivitis candidate epidemics occurred geotemporally closer to outbreak reports than chance alone suggests (P < 0.001) unlike control term candidates (P = 0.40). CONCLUSIONS: Conjunctivitis outbreaks can be detected using temporal scan analysis of Google search data alone, with more than 80% detected before an outbreak report's issuance date, some as early as the reported outbreak's start date. Future approaches using data from smaller regions, social media, and more search terms may improve sensitivity further and cross-validate detected candidates, allowing identification of candidate conjunctivitis epidemics from Internet search data potentially to complementarily benefit traditional reporting and detection systems to improve epidemic awareness.
Delaney AC, Velarde A, Harper MB, Lebel A, Landschaft A, Monuteaux M, Heidary G, Kimia AA. Predictors of Primary Intracranial Hypertension in Children Using a Newly Suggested Opening Pressure Cutoff of 280 mm HO. Pediatr Neurol 2019;91:27-33.Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We assessed the clinical characteristics of primary intracranial hypertension (PIH) in children using a newly recommended threshold for cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure (280 mm HO). METHOD: Cross-sectional study of patients age ≤21 years who had a lumbar puncture done for evaluation of PIH. Patients were excluded if lumbar puncture was done for a suspected infection, seizure, mental status changes, multiple sclerosis, or Guillain-Barre syndrome. Cases were identified using a text-search module followed by manual review. We performed χ2 analysis for categorical data and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous data, followed by a binary logistic regression. RESULTS: We identified 374 patients of whom 67% were female, median age was 13 years interquartile range (11 to 16 years), and admission rate was 24%. Using an opening pressure cutoff of 250 mm HO, 127 patients (34%) were identified as having PIH, whereas using the new cutoff 105 patients (28%) met PIH criteria. Predictors for PIH included optic disc edema or sixth nerve palsy using both old, odds ratio (OR) 7.6 (4.3, 13.5), and new cutoffs, OR 9.7 (95% confidence interval 5.1, 18.5). Headache duration ≤61 days is predictive of PIH using the new cutoff OR 4.1 (95% confidence interval 1.3, 12.8). A model is presented which stratifies patients into groups with low (7%), medium (18%), and high (greater than 42%) risk of PIH. CONCLUSIONS: A higher cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure threshold in the criteria of PIH is associated with PIH patients with a different symptom profile. Children with optic disc edema, bulging fontanel or sixth nerve palsy, are at increased risk for PIH.

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