2020

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Jacobs DS. Infiltrates Versus Ulcers: Why Words Matter. Eye Contact Lens 2020;46(5):263-264.
Jafari A, Lehmann AE, Wolkow N, Juliano AF, Bleier BS, Reinshagen KL. Radioanatomic Characteristics of the Posteromedial Intraconal Space: Implications for Endoscopic Resection of Orbital Lesions. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2020;41(12):2327-2332.Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Imaging is essential in the diagnostic work-up of patients with orbital lesions. The position of an orbital lesion relative to the inferomedial muscular trunk of the ophthalmic artery determines endoscopic resectability, anticipated technical difficulty, and patient morbidity. Although the inferomedial muscular trunk is not readily identifiable on preoperative imaging, we hypothesize that it is spatially approximate to the location where the ophthalmic artery crosses the optic nerve. Our aim was to determine whether the ophthalmic artery-optic nerve crosspoint anatomically approximates the inferomedial muscular trunk in a cadaver study and can be appreciated on imaging of known posteromedial orbital lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Dissection was performed on 17 fresh-frozen cadaver orbits to assess the relationship between the inferomedial muscular trunk and ophthalmic artery-optic nerve crosspoint. Retrospective review of imaging in 9 patients with posteromedial orbital lesions assessed posteromedial orbital compartment characteristics and the ability to locate the ophthalmic artery-optic nerve crosspoint. RESULTS: In our cadaver study, the mean distance between the ophthalmic artery-optic nerve crosspoint and the inferomedial muscular trunk was 1.21 ± 0.64 mm. Retrospectively, the ophthalmic artery-optic nerve crosspoint was identifiable in 9/9 patients, whereas the inferomedial muscular trunk was not identifiable in any patient. Total or partial effacement of the posteromedial intraconal fat triangle was observed in 9/9 patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study of neurovascular relationships within the posteromedial orbit demonstrates that the ophthalmic artery-optic nerve crosspoint closely approximates the inferomedial muscular trunk and can be seen in patients with posteromedial orbital lesions. Posteromedial intraconal fat effacement may help to localize these lesions. These findings may facilitate multidisciplinary communication and help predict lesion resectability and patient outcomes.
Jager MJ, Seddon JM. Eye Diseases Direct Interest to Complement Pathway and Macrophages as Regulators of Inflammation in COVID-19. Asia Pac J Ophthalmol (Phila) 2020;Abstract
Many of the risk factors for developing severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are also risk factors for eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). During the past decades, macrophages and the complement pathway (as a part of the innate immune system) have been identified as important contributors to the development of AMD, and we suggest that these mechanisms are of similar importance for the clinical course of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections. Based on the experience with AMD, we discuss how behavioral factors such as diet, smoking and higher body mass index, as well as genetic determinants such as the complement and immune pathway genes may lead to the overactive inflammatory phenotypes seen in some patients with COVID-19, and may in part explain the heterogeneity of disease manifestations and outcomes. Based on this experience, we discuss potential genetic research projects and elaborate on preventive and treatment approaches related to COVID-19.
Jakobiec FA, Hanbazazh M, Barrantes PC, Chodosh J. Adult Primary Capillary Hemangioma of the Sclera: A Previously Undescribed Entity With a Review of Epibulbar Vascular Lesions. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2020;36(4):327-333.Abstract
PURPOSE: The objective of this article is to document a unique case of a primary hemangioma and review epibulbar vascular tumors of the conjunctiva and episclera. METHODS: A case report with detailed histopathologic, histochemical, and immunohistochemical studies coupled with a comprehensive review of the relevant literature with a tabulation of previously reported epibulbar vascular lesions was performed. RESULTS: A vascular tumor developed in a 46-year-old woman over 2-3 months that histopathologically was located in the superficial third of the normally avascular sclera and was composed of capillary caliber vessels. CD31 and CD34 positivity established the vascular nature of the lesion. Despite its adult onset, the tumor was also glut-1 positive, a vascular characteristic of childhood capillary hemangiomas that will ultimately involute. Smooth muscle actin was positive in the endothelial cells and associated pericytes. An ectatic muscular vessel identified in the midst of the lesion was interpreted as an anomalous intrascleral branch of an epibulbar anterior ciliary artery, where it perforated the sclera in the vicinity of the insertion of an extraocular rectus muscle. It was deduced to be the source of the capillary proliferation. A literature review failed to identify any previously reported epibulbar vascular tumor that originated primarily in the sclera or secondarily infiltrated this ocular tunic. CONCLUSION: An adult primary capillary intrascleral neoplasm is described as the rarest of all epibulbar vascular tumors and in keeping with the exceptional status of the ocular endothelium was glut-1 positive. This lesion must be distinguished from an array of other common and esoteric epibulbar vascular conditions.
Jakobiec FA, Barrantes PC, Yonekawa Y, Lad EM, Proia AD. Subretinal Mononuclear Cells in Coats' Disease Studied with RPE65 and CD163: Evidence for Histiocytoid Pigment Epithelial Cells. Am J Ophthalmol 2020;Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the mononuclear cells in the subretinal exudate in Coats' disease. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: Five enucleated globes and one cytology sample with Coats' disease and one case of chronic retinal detachment following repair of an open globe injury were examined immunohistochemically to identify the intraretinal and subretinal exudative cells. The two biomarkers were RPE65 for retinal pigment epithelium and CD163 for histiocytes, each tagged with different chromogens, yellow for pigment epithelium and purple for CD163+ monocytes/histiocytes. Expressions were sought of both biomarkers together or singly. A color shift to red in the cells' chromogenic reaction indicated the simultaneous presence of the two biomarkers. RESULTS: The majority of the mononuclear cells in Coats' disease were CD163 (purple) positive, and a minority were RPE65 (yellow) positive. An intermediate number of cells were RPE65/CD163 positive (orange-red). The eye with a chronic retinal detachment had an equal distribution of CD163 positive and RPE65/CD163 positive cells. CONCLUSIONS: The retinal pigment epithelium has several well-delineated phenotypes and functions. In normal visual physiology, the pigment epithelium supports the photoreceptors and participates in their renewal by phagocytosis of the tips of the photoreceptors. The expression of CD163, a feature of hematopoietically derived monocytes, together with RPE65 in the retinal pigment epithelium, supports differentiation toward histiocytes. Yellow staining detached pigment epithelial cells were rare. The presence of histiocytoid pigment epithelium at the level of Bruch's membrane probably also has implications for macular degeneration.
Jakobiec FA, Eagle RC, Selig M, Ma L, Shields C. Clinical Implications of Goblet Cells in Dacryoadenosis and Normal Human Lacrimal Glands. Am J Ophthalmol 2020;213:267-282.Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate an enlarged dacryoadenotic lacrimal gland and normal lacrimal glands for the presence of goblet cells (mucocytes). DESIGN: Retrospective clinicopathologic series. METHODS: An enlarged lacrimal gland (dacryoadenosis) without obvious histopathologic alterations was extensively evaluated histochemically, immunohistochemically, and ultrastructurally to detect the presence of goblet cells and to compare the findings with those in five normal lacrimal glands. RESULTS: Granular, zymogen-rich pyramidal acinar cells in normal glands predominated over a previously not reported subpopulation of nongranular, pale-staining cells in both dacryoadenotic and normal lacrimal glands. These cells histochemically stained positively with mucicarmine and Alcian blue. Immunohistochemical and electron microscopic evaluations established that there was a displacement or replacement of cytoplasmic gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 and CK 7-positive tonofilaments in the pale acinar cells by myriad mucus granules. The goblet cells constituted approximately 2% of the normal acinar cells and 5% of dacryoadenotic acinar cells. A depletion of myoepithelial cells and ectopic intra-acinar ductular cells were also observed in dacryoadenosis. CONCLUSION: Dacryoadenosis is caused by an increase in the number of acini without individual acinar cell hyperplasia. A normal cytologic feature of the lacrimal gland is the presence of acinar goblet cells that had been long overlooked; they are increased in number in dacryoadenosis. Intra-acinar ductular cells and the scattered loss of myoepithelial cells are other abnormalities in dacryoadenosis. The presence of lacrimal gland goblet cells may have physiologic implications for the precorneal tear film and its derangements as well as for the histogenesis of mucus-producing carcinomas.
Jamali A, Harris DL, Blanco T, Lopez MJ, Hamrah P. Resident plasmacytoid dendritic cells patrol vessels in the naïve limbus and conjunctiva. Ocul Surf 2020;18(2):277-285.Abstract
Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) constitute a unique population of bone marrow-derived cells that play a pivotal role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses. While peripheral tissues are typically devoid of pDCs during steady state, few tissues do host resident pDCs. In the current study, we aim to assess presence and distribution of pDCs in naïve murine limbus and bulbar conjunctiva. Immunofluorescence staining followed by confocal microscopy revealed that the naïve bulbar conjunctiva of wild-type mice hosts CD45 CD11c PDCA-1 pDCs. Flow cytometry confirmed the presence of resident pDCs in the bulbar conjunctiva through multiple additional markers, and showed that they express maturation markers, the T cell co-inhibitory molecules PD-L1 and B7-H3, and minor to negligible levels of T cell co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD86, and ICAM-1. Epi-fluorescent microscopy of DPE-GFP×RAG1 transgenic mice with GFP-tagged pDCs indicated lower density of pDCs in the bulbar conjunctiva compared to the limbus. Further, intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed that resident pDCs accompany the limbal vessels and patrol the intravascular space. In vitro multiphoton microscopy showed that pDCs are attracted to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and interact with them during tube formation. In conclusion, our study shows that the limbus and bulbar conjunctiva are endowed with resident pDCs during steady state, which express maturation and classic T cell co-inhibitory molecules, engulf limbal vessels, and patrol intravascular spaces.
Jamali A, Hu K, Sendra VG, Blanco T, Lopez MJ, Ortiz G, Qazi Y, Zheng L, Turhan A, Harris DL, Hamrah P. Characterization of Resident Corneal Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and Their Pivotal Role in Herpes Simplex Keratitis. Cell Rep 2020;32(9):108099.Abstract
The presence and potential functions of resident plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in peripheral tissues is unclear. We report that pDCs constitutively populate naïve corneas and are increased during sterile injuries or acute herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) keratitis. Their local depletion leads to severe clinical disease, nerve loss, viral dissemination to the trigeminal ganglion and draining lymph nodes, and mortality, while their local adoptive transfer limits disease. pDCs are the main source of HSV-1-induced IFN-α in the corneal stroma through TLR9, and they prevent re-programming of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to effector ex-Tregs. Clinical signs of infection are observed in pDC-depleted corneas, but not in pDC-sufficient corneas, following low-dose HSV-1 inoculation, suggesting their critical role in corneal antiviral immunity. Our findings demonstrate a vital role for corneal pDCs in the control of local viral infections.
Jampol LM, Glassman AR, Sun J. Evaluation and Care of Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy. N Engl J Med 2020;382(17):1629-1637.
Jhanji V, Chodosh J. Not the 2020 we asked for. Br J Ophthalmol 2020;104(6):741.
Jiang Y, Ondeck C. A Review of New Medications and Future Directions of Medical Therapies in Glaucoma. Semin Ophthalmol 2020;:1-7.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Treatment is still largely targeted at lowering intraocular pressure. Intraocular pressures can be lowered through a variety of topical medications, lasers and incisional surgeries. There are currently several classes of topical medications available in the US that are aimed at lowering intraocular pressure through a variety of different mechanisms. Additionally, there have been numerous different formulations and fixed-dose combination medications that offer greatly expanded treatment options over the last several years. The wide variety of topical medications aim to address the issues with compliance, effectiveness and side effect profile that vary among each individual patient and disease.  Purpose: Three new topical medications, netarsudil 0.02%, latanoprostene bunod 0.24% and fixed-dose combination netarsudil 0.02% - latanoprost 0.005% have been approved in the US market to treat glaucoma. This review article will summarize the studies looking at their effectiveness and side effect profiles and discuss their utilization in the treatment of glaucoma. Additionally, we will briefly discuss future directions of research in topical glaucoma medications. CONCLUSION: Three new topical glaucoma medications offer additional treatment options for patient with glaucoma. Further research is needed to better understand the utility of sustained release formulations in the treatment of glaucoma.
Jowett N, Pineda Ii R. Acellular nerve allografts in corneal neurotisation: an inappropriate choice. Br J Ophthalmol 2020;104(2):149-150.
Jumelle C, Gholizadeh S, Annabi N, Dana R. Advances and limitations of drug delivery systems formulated as eye drops. J Control Release 2020;321:1-22.Abstract
Topical instillation of eye drops remains the most common and easiest route of ocular drug administration, representing the treatment of choice for many ocular diseases. Nevertheless, low ocular bioavailability of topically applied drug molecules can considerably limit their efficacy. Over the last several decades, numerous drug delivery systems (DDS) have been developed in order to improve drug bioavailability on the ocular surfaces. This review systematically covers the most recent advances of DDS applicable by topical instillation, that have shown better performance in in vivo models compared to standard eye drop formulations. These delivery systems are based on in situ forming gels, nanoparticles and combinations of both. Most of the DDS have been developed using natural or synthetic polymers. Polymers offer many advantageous properties for designing advanced DDS including biocompatibility, gelation properties and/or mucoadhesiveness. However, despite the high number of studies published over the last decade, there are several limitations for clinical translation of DDS. This review article focuses on the recent advances for the development of ocular drug delivery systems. In addtion, the potential challenges for commercialization of new DDS are presented.
Junk AK, Chang TC, Vanner E, Chen T. Current Trends in Tonometry and Tonometer Tip Disinfection. J Glaucoma 2020;29(7):507-512.Abstract
PRECIS: A survey among members of the American Glaucoma Society (AGS) and the American Optometry Association (AOA) on tonometer preference and tonometer disinfection indicates a shift to disposable tonometer tips compared with 1987. PURPOSE: This survey's purpose was to determine how eye care providers responded to the 2008 Centers of Disease Control (CDC) tonometer disinfection guidelines, which recommend 10% hypochlorite (dilute bleach) for reusable tonometers. Tonometers measure the eye pressure when they touch the cornea, an essential part of the eye examination. METHODS: AGS and AOA members were surveyed on tonometer preference, tonometer use, disinfection process, disinfectants, disinfection timing, and tonometer damage. RESULTS: Survey responses from 79 AOA members and 197 AGS members are included. The Goldmann tonometer is considered most accurate (70, 89% AOA and 161, 82% AGS). It is preferred by 54 (70%) AOA and 193 (98%) AGS members. Many providers (165) use reusable Goldmann tonometer tips (77, 79% AOA, 88, 45% AGS), and most clean with 70% isopropyl alcohol wipes 59 (77%) AOA and 54 (61%) AGS. In summary, 126 of 276 participants (8, 10% AOA and 118, 60% AGS) follow CDC guidelines by using disposable tips (2 AOA and 109 AGS) or disinfecting reusable tips with 10% hypochlorite (6 AOA and 9 AGS). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of AGS providers follow current CDC tonometer disinfection guidelines by shifting to disposable Goldmann tonometer tips. Only a minority of providers who use reusable tonometer tips disinfect with dilute bleach. Continued education on proper tonometer disinfection is critical to prevent eye-care related infection due to improper disinfection.
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Kallman A, Capowski EE, Wang J, Kaushik AM, Jansen AD, Edwards KL, Chen L, Berlinicke CA, Joseph Phillips M, Pierce EA, Qian J, Wang T-H, Gamm DM, Zack DJ. Investigating cone photoreceptor development using patient-derived NRL null retinal organoids. Commun Biol 2020;3(1):82.Abstract
Photoreceptor loss is a leading cause of blindness, but mechanisms underlying photoreceptor degeneration are not well understood. Treatment strategies would benefit from improved understanding of gene-expression patterns directing photoreceptor development, as many genes are implicated in both development and degeneration. Neural retina leucine zipper (NRL) is critical for rod photoreceptor genesis and degeneration, with NRL mutations known to cause enhanced S-cone syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa. While murine Nrl loss has been characterized, studies of human NRL can identify important insights for human retinal development and disease. We utilized iPSC organoid models of retinal development to molecularly define developmental alterations in a human model of NRL loss. Consistent with the function of NRL in rod fate specification, human retinal organoids lacking NRL develop S-opsin dominant photoreceptor populations. We report generation of two distinct S-opsin expressing populations in NRL null retinal organoids and identify MEF2C as a candidate regulator of cone development.
Kang JH, VoPham T, Laden F, Rosner BA, Wirostko B, Ritch R, Wiggs JL, Qureshi A, Nan H, Pasquale LR. Cohort Study of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer and the Risk of Exfoliation Glaucoma. J Glaucoma 2020;Abstract
PRECIS: In a cohort study of 120,307 participants with 25+ years of follow-up, a history of non-melanoma skin cancer was associated with a 40% higher exfoliation glaucoma risk. PURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship between non-melanoma skin cancer (a marker of ultraviolet radiation exposure) and exfoliation glaucoma (XFG). METHODS: We performed a cohort study of US women (n=79,102; 1980-2014) and men (n=41,205; 1986-2014), aged 40+ years and at risk for glaucoma who reported eye exams. From 1984 (women)/1988 (men), we asked about basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) history separately; in prior years, we asked about any non-melanoma skin cancer history in a single question. SCC was confirmed with histopathology reports while BCC and any early (<1984/<1988) non-melanoma skin cancer history was self-reported. Incident XFG cases (362 women and 83 men) were confirmed with medical records. Using pooled data, we estimated multivariable-adjusted relative risks (MVRR; 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) with Cox proportional hazards models that were stratified by age (in months), 2-year time period at risk and average lifetime residential latitude. RESULTS: In multivariable-adjusted analyses, we observed a 40% higher XFG risk with any non-melanoma skin cancer history (MVRR=1.40; 95% CI=1.08,1.82); the association was observed even with 4 and 8 year lags in non-melanoma skin cancer history. Also, the non-melanoma skin cancer association was stronger in younger (<65▒y; MVRR=2.56; 95% CI=1.62,4.05) versus older participants (≥65▒y; MVRR=1.25; 95% CI=0.94,1.66; p for interaction=0.01) and those living in northern latitudes (≥42° north; MVRR=1.92; 95% CI=1.28,2.88) versus more southern latitudes (<42° north; MVRR=1.19; 95% CI=0.86,1.66; p for interaction=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Non-melanoma skin cancer was associated with higher XFG risk, particularly among younger participants and those living in Northern US.
Kang J, Cho SS, Kim HY, Lee BH, Cho HJ, Gwak YS. Regional Hyperexcitability and Chronic Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury. Cell Mol Neurobiol 2020;40(6):861-878.Abstract
Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes maladaptive changes to nociceptive synaptic circuits within the injured spinal cord. Changes also occur at remote regions including the brain stem, limbic system, cortex, and dorsal root ganglia. These maladaptive nociceptive synaptic circuits frequently cause neuronal hyperexcitability in the entire nervous system and enhance nociceptive transmission, resulting in chronic central neuropathic pain following SCI. The underlying mechanism of chronic neuropathic pain depends on the neuroanatomical structures and electrochemical communication between pre- and postsynaptic neuronal membranes, and propagation of synaptic transmission in the ascending pain pathways. In the nervous system, neurons are the only cell type that transmits nociceptive signals from peripheral receptors to supraspinal systems due to their neuroanatomical and electrophysiological properties. However, the entire range of nociceptive signaling is not mediated by any single neuron. Current literature describes regional studies of electrophysiological or neurochemical mechanisms for enhanced nociceptive transmission post-SCI, but few studies report the electrophysiological, neurochemical, and neuroanatomical changes across the entire nervous system following a regional SCI. We, along with others, have continuously described the enhanced nociceptive transmission in the spinal dorsal horn, brain stem, thalamus, and cortex in SCI-induced chronic central neuropathic pain condition, respectively. Thus, this review summarizes the current understanding of SCI-induced neuronal hyperexcitability and maladaptive nociceptive transmission in the entire nervous system that contributes to chronic central neuropathic pain.
Kang JH, Boumenna T, Stein JD, Khawaja A, Rosner BA, Wiggs JL, Pasquale LR. Notice of Retraction and Replacement. Kang et al. Association of statin use and high serum cholesterol levels with risk of primary open-angle glaucoma. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2019;137(7):756-765. JAMA Ophthalmol 2020;
Kang JH, VoPham T, Laden F, Rosner BA, Wirostko B, Ritch R, Wiggs JL, Qureshi A, Nan H, Pasquale LR. Cohort Study of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer and the Risk of Exfoliation Glaucoma. J Glaucoma 2020;29(6):448-455.Abstract
PRECIS: In a cohort study of 120,307 participants with 25+ years of follow-up, a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was associated with a 40% higher exfoliation glaucoma (XFG) risk. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between NMSC (a marker of ultraviolet radiation exposure) and XFG. METHODS: We performed a cohort study of US women (n=79,102; 1980-2014) and men (n=41,205; 1986-2014), aged 40+ years and at risk for glaucoma who reported eye examinations. From 1984 (women)/1988 (men), we asked about basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma history separately; in prior years, we asked about any NMSC history in a single question. Squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed with histopathology reports while basal cell carcinoma and any early (<1984/<1988) NMSC history was self-reported. Incident XFG cases (362 women and 83 men) were confirmed with medical records. Using pooled data, we estimated multivariable-adjusted relative risks [MVRRs; 95% confidence intervals (CIs)] with Cox proportional hazards models that were stratified by age (in mo), 2-year time period at risk and average lifetime residential latitude. RESULTS: In multivariable-adjusted analyses, we observed a 40% higher XFG risk with any NMSC history (MVRR=1.40; 95% CI=1.08-1.82); the association was observed even with 4 and 8-year lags in NMSC history. Also, the NMSC association was stronger in younger (below 65 y; MVRR=2.56; 95% CI=1.62-4.05) versus older participants (65 y and above; MVRR=1.25; 95% CI=0.94-1.66; P for interaction=0.01) and those living in the northern latitudes (≥42°N; MVRR=1.92; 95% CI=1.28-2.88) versus more southern latitudes (<42°N; MVRR=1.19; 95% CI=0.86-1.66; P for interaction=0.04). CONCLUSION: NMSC was associated with higher XFG risk, particularly among younger participants and those living in the Northern US.
Keel S, Evans JR, Block S, Bourne R, Calonge M, Cheng C-Y, Friedman DS, Furtado JM, Khanna RC, Mathenge W, Mariotti S, Matoto E, Müller A, Rabiu MM, Rasengane T, Zhao J, Wormald R, Cieza A. Strengthening the integration of eye care into the health system: methodology for the development of the WHO package of eye care interventions. BMJ Open Ophthalmol 2020;5(1):e000533.Abstract
Objective: To describe the rational for, and the methods that will be employed to develop, the WHO package of eye care interventions (PECI). Methods and analysis: The development of the package will be conducted in four steps: (1) selection of eye conditions (for which interventions will be included in the package) based on epidemiological data on the causes of vision impairment and blindness, prevalence estimates of eye conditions and health facility data; (2) identification of interventions and related evidence for the selected eye conditions from clinical practice guidelines and high-quality systematic reviews by a technical working group; (3) expert agreement on the inclusion of eye care interventions in the package and the description of resources required for the provision of the selected interventions; and (4) peer review. The project will be led by the WHO Vision Programme in collaboration with Cochrane Eyes and Vision. A Technical Advisory Group, comprised of public health and clinical experts in the field, will provide technical input throughout all stages of development. Results: After considering the feedback of Technical Advisory Group members and reviewing-related evidence, a final list of eye conditions for which interventions will be included in the package has been collated. Conclusion: The PECI will support Ministries of Health in prioritising, planning, budgeting and integrating eye care interventions into health systems. It is anticipated that the PECI will be available for use in 2021.

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