2021

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Gram M, Ekström C, Holmqvist B, Carey G, Wang X, Vallius S, Hellström W, Ortenlöf N, Agyemang AA, Smith LEH, Hellström A, Mangili A, Barton N, Ley D. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 in the Preterm Rabbit Pup: Characterization of Cerebrovascular Maturation following Administration of Recombinant Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1/Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1-Binding Protein 3. Dev Neurosci 2021;:1-15.Abstract
Following preterm birth, serum levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) decrease compared to corresponding in utero levels. A recent clinical trial indicated that supplementation with recombinant human (rh) IGF-1/rhIGF-binding protein 3 (rhIGF-1/rhIGFBP-3) prevents severe intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in extremely preterm infants. In a preterm rabbit pup model, we characterized endogenous serum and hepatic IGF-1, along with brain distribution of IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R). We then evaluated the effects of rhIGF-1/rhIGFBP-3 on gene expression of regulators of cerebrovascular maturation and structure. Similar to preterm infants, serum IGF-1 concentrations decreased rapidly after preterm birth in the rabbit pup. Administration of rhIGF-1/rhIGFBP-3 restored in utero serum levels but was rapidly eliminated. Immunolabeled IGF1R was widely distributed in multiple brain regions, displaying an abundant density in the choroid plexus and sub-ependymal germinal zones. Increased IGF-1 immunoreactivity, distributed as IGF1R, was detected 4 h after rhIGF-1/rhIGFBP-3 administration. The rhIGF-1/rhIGFBP-3 treatment led to upregulation of choroid plexus genes involved in vascular maturation and structure, with corresponding protein translation for most of these genes. The preterm rabbit pup model is well suited for evaluation of IGF-1-based prevention of IVH. Administration of rhIGF-1/rhIGFBP-3 affects cerebrovascular maturation, suggesting a role for it in preventing preterm IVH.
Green MB, Daly MK, Laver NMV, Lefebvre DR. Adult-onset asthma and periocular xanthogranuloma - A rare infiltrative disease of the orbit and eyelid. Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep 2021;22:101043.Abstract
Purpose: To present a case of adult onset asthma with periocular xanthogranuloma (AAPOX), and discuss existing literature on adult orbital xanthogranulomatous diseases (AOXGDs) and their treatment. Observations: A 63 year old male presented with progressive bilateral eyelid swelling with overlying yellow plaques associated with asthma. CT scan showed periorbital swelling with enlargement of the superior and lateral rectus muscles bilaterally. Biopsy demonstrated orbital xanthogranulomatous disease with increased IgG4 plasma cells. The patient was treated with intralesional triamcinolone, oral prednisone, and cyclophosphamide without significant improvement. Surgical debulking was eventually performed which improved his external symptoms until he was lost to follow up 15 months later. Conclusions and Importance: AOXGDs are a group of rare infiltrative diseases of the eyelids and orbit that can be associated with significant systemic morbidities. While they all have similar underlying histopathologic features, appreciating the clinical difference between these diseases is important in understanding patient prognosis and ensuring appropriate clinical monitoring. There is also growing research demonstrating that AAPOX, along with other AOXGDs, may represent part of a continuum of IgG4 related disease, similar to what is seen in this case. There is currently no reliably effective treatment for AOXGDs, and additional research into the management of these diseases is necessary.
Greenwald SH, Brown EE, Scandura MJ, Hennessey E, Farmer R, Du J, Wang Y, Pierce EA. Mutant Nmnat1 leads to a retina-specific decrease of NAD+ accompanied by increased poly(ADP-ribose) in a mouse model of NMNAT1-associated retinal degeneration. Hum Mol Genet 2021;30(8):644-657.Abstract
Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT1) is required for nuclear nicotinamide adenine mononucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis in all nucleated cells, and despite its functional ubiquity, mutations in this gene lead to an isolated retinal degeneration. The mechanisms underlying how mutant NMNAT1 causes disease are not well understood, nor is the reason why the pathology is confined to the retina. Using a mouse model of NMNAT1-associated retinal degeneration that harbors the p.Val9Met mutation, we tested the hypothesis that decreased function of mutant NMNAT1 has a greater effect on the levels of NAD+ in the retina than elsewhere in the body. Measurements by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry showed an early and sustained decrease of NAD+ in mutant retinas that was not observed in other tissues. To understand how consumers of nuclear NAD+ are affected by the reduced availability of NAD+ in mutant retinas, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and nuclear sirtuin activity were evaluated. PARP activity was elevated during disease progression, as evidenced by overproduction of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in photoreceptors, whereas histone deacetylation activity of nuclear sirtuins was not altered. We hypothesized that PARP could be activated because of elevated levels of oxidative stress; however, we did not observe oxidative DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, or a low glutathione to oxidized glutathione ratio. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining revealed that photoreceptors appear to ultimately die by apoptosis, although the low NAD+ levels and overproduction of PAR suggest that cell death may include aspects of the parthanatos cell death pathway.
Gu P, Fan T, Wong SSC, Pan Z, Tai WL, Chung SK, Cheung CW. Central Endothelin-1 Confers Analgesia by Triggering Spinal Neuronal Histone Deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) Nuclear Exclusion in Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in Mice. J Pain 2021;22(4):454-471.Abstract
The rationale of spinal administration of endothelin-1(ET-1) mediated anti-nociceptive effect has not been elucidated. ET-1 is reported to promote nuclear effluxion of histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) in myocytes, and spinal HDAC5 is implicated in modulation of pain processing. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether central ET-1 plays an anti-nociceptive role by facilitating spinal HDAC5 nuclear shuttling under neuropathic pain. Here, we demonstrate that upregulating spinal ET-1 attenuated the nociception induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation surgery and this analgesic effect mediated by ET-1 was attenuated by intrathecal injection of endothelin A receptor selective inhibitor (BQ123) or by blocking the exportation of nuclear HDAC5 by adeno-associated viruses targeting neuronal HDAC5 (AVV-HDAC5 S259/498A Mutant). Notably, ET-1 administration increased spinal glutamate acid decarboxylases (GAD65/67) expression via initiating HDAC5 nuclear exportation and increased the acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 (Acetyl-H3K9) in the promotor regions of spinal Gad1 and Gad2 genes. This was reversed by blocking endothelin A receptor function or by inhibiting the spinal neuronal nuclear exportation of HDAC5. Therefore, inducing spinal GABAergic neuronal HDAC5 nuclear exportation may be a novel therapeutic approach for managing neuropathic pain. PERSPECTIVE: Neuropathic pain is intractable in a clinical setting, and epigenetic regulation is considered to contribute to this processing. Characterizing the anti-nociceptive effect of ET-1 and investigating the associated epigenetic mechanisms in animal models may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies and targets for treating neuropathic pain.
Guo X, Nguyen AM, Vongsachang H, Kretz AM, Mukherjee RM, Neitzel AJ, Shakarchi AF, Friedman DS, Repka MX, Collins ME. Refractive Error Findings in Students Who Failed School-based Vision Screening. Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2021;:1-9.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report refractive error findings in Baltimore City schoolchildren who failed school-based vision screenings. METHODS: In this cross-sectional analysis, students pre-kindergarten through 8th grade who failed screenings during school years 2016-2019 received an eye examination, including non-cycloplegic autorefraction and visual acuity (VA) measurements. Refractive error was identified when there was at least: -0.50 diopter (D) spherical equivalent (SE) myopia, +0.50D SE hyperopia, 1.00D astigmatism, or 1.00D anisometropia in either eye. Generalized estimating equation models were used to identify factors associated with clinically significant refractive error, defined as decreased VA and more severe refractive error. RESULTS: Of 7520 students who failed screening, 6627 (88%) were analyzed. Clinically significant refractive error and any refractive error were found in 2352 (35.5%) and 5952 (89.8%) students, respectively. Mild myopia (45%, -0.50 D to <-3.00 D SE) and low astigmatism (47%, 1.00 D to <3.00 D cylinder) were the most prevalent types of refractive error. Proportions of students with myopia increased with higher grade levels (Ptrend<0.001). Myopia and astigmatism were more common in black and Latinx. Risk factors for clinically significant refractive error included higher grades (odds ratios [OR] ranged from 1.30 to 2.19 compared with 1st grade, P < .05) and Latinx ethnicity (OR = 1.31, 95%CI: 1.08-1.59). CONCLUSION: A Baltimore school-based vision program identified a substantial number of students with refractive error in a high-poverty urban community. Over 1/3 students who failed vision screening had clinically significant refractive error, with black and Latinx students at higher risk of having myopia and astigmatism.
Gupta PK, Venkateswaran N. The role of KPI-121 0.25% in the treatment of dry eye disease: penetrating the mucus barrier to treat periodic flares. Ther Adv Ophthalmol 2021;13:25158414211012797.Abstract
The tear film, which includes mucins that adhere to foreign particles, rapidly clears allergens and pathogens from the ocular surface, protecting the underlying tissues. However, the tear film's ability to efficiently remove foreign particles during blinking can also pose challenges for topical drug delivery, as traditional eye drops (solutions and suspensions) are cleared from the ocular surface before the drug can penetrate into the conjunctival and corneal epithelium. In the past 15 years, there has been an increase in the development of nanoparticles with specialized coatings that have reduced affinity to mucins and are small enough in size to pass through the mucus barrier. These mucus-penetrating particles (MPPs) have been shown to efficiently penetrate the mucus barrier and reach the ocular surface tissues. Dry eye disease (DED) is a common inflammatory ocular surface disorder that often presents with periodic flares (exacerbations). However, currently approved immunomodulatory treatments for DED are intended for long-term use. Thus, there is a need for effective short-term treatments that can address intermittent flares of DED. Loteprednol etabonate, an ocular corticosteroid, was engineered to break down rapidly after administration to the ocular surface tissues and thereby reduce risks associated with other topical steroids. KPI-121 is an ophthalmic suspension that uses the MPP technology to deliver loteprednol etabonate more efficiently to the ocular tissues, achieving in animal models a 3.6-fold greater penetration of loteprednol etabonate to the cornea than traditional loteprednol etabonate ophthalmic suspensions. In clinical trials, short-term treatment with KPI-121 0.25% significantly reduced signs and symptoms of DED compared with its vehicle (placebo). Recently approved KPI-121 0.25%, with its novel drug delivery design and ease of use, has the potential to effectively treat periodic flares of DED experienced by many patients.
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Habib LA, North VS, Freitag SK, Yoon MK, Lefebvre DR, Lee NG. Medical comorbidities and orbital implant exposure. Acta Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate medical conditions and systemic therapies associated with orbital implant exposure in patients with anophthalmic sockets. METHODS: Retrospective review of patients who underwent enucleation or evisceration at a single centre between January 1, 2008 and March 1, 2018. Medical comorbidities, including peripheral or coronary artery disease, rheumatologic conditions, diabetes, malignancy and history of smoking were recorded. Use of immunomodulatory and anticoagulation therapy at the time of eye removal was noted. Patients were divided into two groups-those with implant exposure and those without. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to compare groups. RESULTS: Two hundred and twenty-nine patients underwent eye removal surgery over a ten-year period. Implant exposure was seen in 20 (8.7%) patients. Univariate analysis revealed a statistically significant difference between groups in rates of smoking, malignancy, and immunomodulatory therapy at the time of surgery. A history of smoking (HR = 11.72; 95% CI: 2.95, 46.53; p = 0.0001) and immunomodulatory therapy (HR = 8.02; 95% CI: 1.96, 32.87; p = 0.004) were independent predictors of exposure. The probability of exposure was 81.2% when all three risk factors were present versus 4.4% when none were present (c-index = 0.737, 95% CI: 0.608, 0.865; p < 0.001). The model was a good fit to the data (Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test p = 0.475). CONCLUSIONS: Smoking and immunomodulatory therapy were associated with orbital implant exposure in patients with anophthalmic sockets. This is the first report examining medical comorbidities in patients with orbital implant exposure. Understanding the pathophysiology of implant exposure is crucial to preoperative planning and postoperative care.
Hainsworth DP, Gao X, Bebu I, Das A, Olmos de Koo L, Barkmeier AJ, Tamborlane W, Lachin JM, Aiello LP, and and of and Group DCCTF-up EDICR. Refractive Error and Retinopathy Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetes: The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study. Ophthalmology 2021;128(4):554-560.Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the relationship between refractive error and diabetic retinopathy (DR). DESIGN: Clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Type I diabetes individuals with serial refractive error and DR stage measurements over 30 years in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) follow-up study. METHODS: Stage of DR was measured every 6 months from standard fundus photographs, and refractive error was measured annually during the 6.5 years of DCCT; then, both were staggered every fourth year during EDIC with the full cohort measured at EDIC years 4 and 10. Outcomes of DR were 2- or 3-step progression, presence of proliferative DR (PDR), clinically significant macular edema (CSME), diabetic macular edema (DME), or ocular surgery. Myopia, emmetropia, and hyperopia were defined as a spherical equivalent of ≤-0.5, >-0.5 and <0.5, and ≥0.5, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: For each outcome separately, Cox proportional hazard (PH) models assessed the association between the refractive error status and the subsequent risk of that outcome, both without and with adjustment for potential risk factors. RESULTS: Hyperopia was associated with a higher risk of 2-step progression (hazard ratio [HR], 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.59), 3-step progression (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.05-1.73), and PDR (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.02-1.92) compared with emmetropia in unadjusted models. These associations remained significant after adjustment for DCCT treatment group, cohort, age, sex, smoking, duration of diabetes, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, pulse, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, albumin excretion rate, and DCCT/EDIC mean updated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (2-step progression: HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.03-1.58; 3-step progression: HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.00-1.68; PDR: HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.00-1.90). Myopia was not associated with any of the 5 DR outcomes in the unadjusted models and only marginally associated with 2-step progression (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.00-1.24) in the adjusted models. CONCLUSIONS: Myopia is not associated with DR progression risk. Hyperopia is an independent risk factor for 2-step and 3-step DR progression and PDR.
Halawa O, Zebardast N, Kolli A, Foster PJ, He M, Aung T, Friedman DS. Population-based utility of van Herick grading for angle closure detection. Ophthalmology 2021;Abstract
We report the sensitivity and specificity of van Herick (VH) grading in detecting gonioscopically-defined primary angle closure suspects (PACS) among subjects screened for participation in a population-based trial in southern China. A cut-off of VH≤25% was found to have sensitivity and specificity rates of 98.2% and 25.9%, respectively. Rates were adjusted for missing gonioscopy data, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 92.5% and 61.5%, respectively.
Halawa O, Mitchell W, Zebardast N. Fall-related eye injury among older adults in the United States. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To identify common causes of emergency department-treated eye injury among older adults in the United States (US), and to characterize of fall-related ocular trauma in this population. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study METHODS: Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, a nationally representative database of US emergency department-treated injuries, was used to assemble a cohort of adults 65 years and older with eye injuries between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2019. Demographic information, diagnosis, disposition, injury location and consumer product associated with injury were collected. Narrative descriptions of all injuries were reviewed to identify eye injuries secondary to falls. RESULTS: 4,953 eye injuries among older adults were reported from 2000 to 2019, a stratified probability sample representing approximately 238,162 injuries, with an average annual frequency of 12,000 injuries. Falls accounted for 11.5% of these injuries. Fall-related eye injuries commonly presented from home (66.5%) and were more likely to occur in the winter than eye injuries from other causes (28.1% vs. 18.4%, p<0.01). Risk factors for fall-related eye injury included older age (Odds ratio [OR] 1.11, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.10-1.13 per year), female sex (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.6-3.1 vs. male), Black race (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.5 vs. White) and presentation from a nursing home (OR 12.7, 95% CI 4.9-32.8 vs. other locations). Older adults with fall-related injury were more likely to be hospitalized (OR 22.8, 95% CI 15.3-33.9) and to suffer from a ruptured globe (OR 14.1, 95% CI 6.5-30.6) than those with fall-unrelated injury. CONCLUSIONS: Falls are an important mechanism of ocular trauma in older adults and are associated with worse outcomes compared to eye injuries from other causes.
Halawa OA, Friedman DS, Roldan AM, Zebardast N. Changing trends in ocular trauma during the COVID-19 pandemic in the USA. Br J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with a decline in emergency department (ED) presentations for trauma. The purpose of this study is to compare the estimated number and characteristics of eye injuries in 2020, the year of the COVID-19 pandemic, to those in 2011-2019. METHODS: A stratified probability sample of US ED-treated eye injuries was used to calculate the estimated annual number and incidence of these injuries in 2020, the year of the pandemic, and 2011-2019 (prepandemic years). Two-sample t-tests and Pearson χ2 were used to assess differences in demographics and injury characteristics. For multiple comparisons, Bonferroni correction was applied. RESULTS: The estimated number of ED-treated eye injuries per year was 152 957 (95% CI 132 637 to 176 153) in 2020 and 194 142 (95% CI 191 566 to 196 401) in 2011-2019. The annual incidence of ED-treated eye injuries was lower in 2020, at 46 per 100 000 population than in 2011-2019, at 62 per 100 000 per year (p<0.001). In 2020 vs 2011-2019, there was a higher incidence of ruptured globes (0.5 per 100 000 vs 0.3 per 100 000 per year, p<0.001), hyphemas (0.6 per 100 000 vs 0.4 per 100 000 per year, p<0.001), lacerations (1.0 per 100 000 in 2020 vs 0.8 per 100 000 per year, p<0.001) and orbital fractures (0.3 per 100 000 vs 0.03). CONCLUSION: The estimated incidence of eye injuries presenting to the ED was significantly lower in 2020 than in 2011-2019, but there was a higher estimated incidence of severe eye injuries. Changes in living and work environments due to the COVID-19 pandemic were likely associated with the differences in ocular trauma presentations observed in this study.
Han H, Yang Y, Liu B, Tian J, Dong L, Qi H, Zhu W, Wang J, Lei H. Chalcomoracin prevents vitreous-induced activation of AKT and migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells. J Cell Mol Med 2021;Abstract
Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are the major cell type in the epi- or sub-retinal membranes in the pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), which is a blinding fibrotic eye disease and still short of effective medicine. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate whether Chalocomoracin (CMR), a novel purified compound from fungus-infected mulberry leaves, is able to inhibit vitreous-induced signalling events and cellular responses intrinsic to PVR. Our studies have revealed that the CMR IC50 for ARPE-19 cells is 35.5 μmol/L at 72 hours, and that 5 μmol/L CMR inhibits vitreous-induced Akt activation and p53 suppression; in addition, we have discovered that this chemical effectively blocks vitreous-stimulated proliferation, migration and contraction of ARPE-19 cells, suggesting that CMR is a promising PVR prophylactic.
Han H, Yang Y, Wu Z, Liu B, Dong L, Deng H, Tian J, Lei H. Capilliposide B blocks VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Biomed Pharmacother 2021;133:110999.Abstract
Abnormal angiogenesis is associated with intraocular diseases such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration, and current therapies for these eye diseases are not satisfactory. The purpose of this study was to determine whether capilliposide B (CPS-B), a novel oleanane triterpenoid saponin derived from Lysimachia capillipes Hemsl, can inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis signaling events and cellular responses in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs). Our study revealed that the capilliposide B IC for HRECs was 8.5 μM at 72 h and that 1 μM capilliposide B specifically inhibited VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling enzymes Akt and Erk. In addition, we discovered that this chemical effectively blocked VEGF-stimulated proliferation, migration and tube formation of the HRECs, suggesting that capilliposide B is a promising prophylactic for angiogenesis-associated diseases such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
Hanumunthadu D, Lescrauwaet B, Jaffe M, Sadda SV, Wiecek E, Hubschman JP, Patel PJ. Clinical Update on Metamorphopsia: Epidemiology, Diagnosis and Imaging. Curr Eye Res 2021;:1-15.Abstract
Purpose: To discuss the pathophysiology of metamorphopsia, its characterisation using retinal imaging and methods of assessment of patient symptoms and visual function.Methods: A literature search of electronic databases was performedResults: Metamorphopsia has commonly been associated with vitreomacular interface disorders (such as epiretinal membrane) and has also regularly been noted in diseases of the retina and choroid, particularly age-related macular degeneration and central serous chorioretinopathy. Developments in optical coherence tomography retinal imaging have enabled improved imaging of the foveal microstructure and have led to the localisation of the pathophysiology of metamorphopsia within the retinal layers of the macula. Alteration of alignment of inner and outer retinal layers at various retinal loci has been identified using multimodal imaging in patients with metamorphopsia in a range of conditions. Although the Amsler Grid assessment of metamorphopsia is a useful clinical indicator, new emerging methods of metamorphopsia assessment with psychophysical tests such as M-CHARTS and preferential hyperacuity perimetry, have been developed.Conclusions: It appears that there is a complex relationship between visual acuity and metamorphopsia symptoms that vary between retinal conditions. Although metamorphopsia has traditionally been challenging to measure in the clinic, advances in technology promise more robust, easy-to-use tests. It is possible that home assessment of metamorphopsia, particularly in conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, may help to guide the need for further clinic evaluation and consideration of treatment.
Hanyuda A, Rosner BA, Wiggs JL, Willett WC, Tsubota K, Pasquale LR, Kang JH. Prospective study of dietary intake of branched-chain amino acids and the risk of primary open-angle glaucoma. Acta Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: Metabolomic and preclinical studies suggest that branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) may be inversely associated with neurodegenerative diseases including glaucoma. We therefore assessed the long-term association between dietary intake of BCAA and incident primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and POAG subtypes. METHODS: We followed biennially participants of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS; 65 531 women: 1984-2016), Health Professionals Follow-up Study (42 254 men: 1986-2016) and NHSII (66 904 women; 1991-2017). Eligible participants were 40+ years old and reported eye examinations. Repeated validated food frequency questionnaires were used to assess dietary intake of BCAA. Incident cases of POAG and POAG subtypes defined by visual field (VF) loss and untreated intraocular pressure (IOP) were confirmed by medical record review. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (MVRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: We identified 1946 incident POAG cases. The pooled MVRRs of POAG for the highest quintile (Q5 = 17.1 g/day) versus lowest quintile (Q1 = 11.2 g/day) of total BCAA intake was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.73-1.19; ptrend  = 0.45; pheterogeneity by sex  = 0.24). For subtypes of POAG defined by IOP level or POAG with only peripheral VF loss, no associations were observed for men or women (ptrend  ≥ 0.20); however, for the POAG subtype with early paracentral VF loss, there was a suggestion of an inverse association in women (MVRRQ5versusQ1  = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.57-1.12; ptrend  = 0.12]) but not in men (MVRRQ5versusQ1  = 1.38 [95% CI, 0.81-2.34; ptrend  = 0.28; pheterogeneity by sex  = 0.06]). CONCLUSION: Higher dietary intake of BCAA was not associated with POAG risk.
Haque M, Xiong X, Lei F, Das JK, Song J. An optimized protocol for the generation of HBV viral antigen-specific T lymphocytes from pluripotent stem cells. STAR Protoc 2021;2(1):100264.Abstract
In T cell-based cancer immunotherapy, tumor antigen (Ag)-specific CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can specifically target tumor Ags on malignant cells. This promising approach drove us to adopt this strategy of T cell transfer (ACT)-based immunotherapy for chronic viral infections. Here, we describe the generation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) Ag-specific CTLs from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), i.e., iPSC-CTLs. Ag-specific iPSC-CTLs can target HBV Ag cells and infiltrate into the liver to suppress HBV replication in a murine model. For complete details on the use and execution of this protocol, please refer to Haque et al. (2020).
Haque M, Lei F, Xiong X, Ren Y, Peng H-Y, Wang L, Kumar A, Das JK, Song J. Stem Cell-Derived Viral Antigen-Specific T Cells Suppress HIV Replication and PD-1 Expression on CD4+ T Cells. Viruses 2021;13(5)Abstract
The viral antigen (Ag)-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), i.e., PSC-CTLs, have the ability to suppress the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. After adoptive transfer, PSC-CTLs can infiltrate into the local tissues to suppress HIV replication. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which the viral Ag-specific PSC-CTLs elicit the antiviral response remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we generated the functional HIV-1 Gag epitope SL9-specific CTLs from the induced PSC (iPSCs), i.e., iPSC-CTLs, and investigated the suppression of SL9-specific iPSC-CTLs on viral replication and the protection of CD4+ T cells. A chimeric HIV-1, i.e., EcoHIV, was used to produce HIV replication in mice. We show that adoptive transfer of SL9-specific iPSC-CTLs greatly suppressed EcoHIV replication in the peritoneal macrophages and spleen in the animal model. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the adoptive transfer significantly reduced expression of PD-1 on CD4+ T cells in the spleen and generated persistent anti-HIV memory T cells. These results indicate that stem cell-derived viral Ag-specific CTLs can robustly accumulate in the local tissues to suppress HIV replication and prevent CD4+ T cell exhaustion through reduction of PD-1 expression.
He B, Tanya SM, Wang C, Kezouh A, Torun N, Ing E. The incidence of sympathetic ophthalmia after trauma: A meta-analysis. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: Sympathetic ophthalmia (SO) is a rare, bilateral panuveitis that occurs following open globe injury (OGI), with a variable incidence reported in the literature. Our objective was to determine the incidence proportion and incidence rate of SO following OGI to help guide shared physician-patient decision making. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases from inception to November 2020 for population-based studies on OGI and SO in adults and children. Two reviewers independently screened search results. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed to calculate the incidence proportion and incidence rate. The Risk Of Bias In Non-Randomized Studies - of Interventions (ROBINS-I) tool was used to assess the risk of bias. The study was registered on PROSPERO CRD42020198920. RESULTS: A total of 24 studies were utilized in the meta-analyses. After OGI, the estimated overall incidence proportion of SO was 0.19% (95% CI 0.14%-0.24%) and the incidence rate of SO was 33 per 100,000 person-years, (95% CI 19.61-56.64) with I2 of 13% and 72%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: SO after OGI is rare. The estimated incidence proportion and incidence rate are useful when counselling patients regarding management options after OGI. Further studies are needed to examine the influence of age, the extent and location of trauma, timing of repair, and prophylactic eye removal on the incidence of SO.
Heidary G, Aakalu VK, Binenbaum G, Chang MY, Morrison DG, VanderVeen DK, Lambert SR, Trivedi RH, Galvin JA, Pineles SL. Adjustable Sutures in the Treatment of Strabismus: A Report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To review the scientific literature that evaluates the effectiveness of adjustable sutures in the management of strabismus for adult and pediatric patients. METHODS: Literature searches were performed in the PubMed database through April 2021 with no date limitations and were restricted to publications in English. The searches identified 551 relevant citations, of which 55 were reviewed in full text. Of these, 17 articles met the inclusion criteria and were assigned a level of evidence rating by the panel methodologist. The search included all randomized controlled studies regardless of study size and cohort studies of 100 or more patients comparing the adjustable versus nonadjustable suture technique, with a focus on motor alignment outcomes or reoperation rates. RESULTS: The literature search yielded no level I studies. Of the 17 articles that met the inclusion criteria, 11 were rated level II and 6 were rated level III. Among the 12 studies that focused on motor alignment outcomes, 4 small randomized clinical trials (RCTs) did not find a statistically significant difference between groups, although they were powered to detect only very large differences. Seven of 8 nonrandomized studies found a statistically significant difference in motor alignment success in favor of the adjustable suture technique, both overall and in certain subgroups of patients. Successful motor alignment was seen in both exotropia (in 3 studies that were not limited to children) and esotropia (in 1 study of adults and 2 of children). The majority of included studies that reported on reoperation rates found the rates to be lower in patients who underwent strabismus surgery with adjustable sutures, but this finding was not uniformly demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: Although there are no level I studies evaluating the effectiveness of adjustable sutures for strabismus surgery, the majority of nonrandomized studies that met the inclusion criteria for this assessment reported an advantage of the adjustable suture technique over the nonadjustable technique with respect to motor alignment outcomes. This finding was not uniformly demonstrated among all studies reviewed and warrants further investigation in the development and analysis of adjustable suture techniques.
van der Heide C, Goar W, Meyer KJ, Alward WLM, Boese EA, Sears NC, Roos BR, Kwon YH, DeLuca AP, Siggs OM, Gonzaga-Jauregui C, Sheffield VC, Wang K, Stone EM, Mullins RF, Anderson MG, Fan BJ, Ritch R, Craig JE, Wiggs JL, Scheetz TE, Fingert JH. Exome-based investigation of the genetic basis of human pigmentary glaucoma. BMC Genomics 2021;22(1):477.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is a leading cause of visual disability and blindness. Release of iris pigment within the eye, pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS), can lead to one type of glaucoma known as pigmentary glaucoma. PDS has a genetic component, however, the genes involved with this condition are largely unknown. We sought to discover genes that cause PDS by testing cohorts of patients and controls for mutations using a tiered analysis of exome data. RESULTS: Our primary analysis evaluated melanosome-related genes that cause dispersion of iris pigment in mice (TYRP1, GPNMB, LYST, DCT, and MITF). We identified rare mutations, but they were not statistically enriched in PDS patients. Our secondary analyses examined PMEL (previously linked with PDS), MRAP, and 19 other genes. Four MRAP mutations were identified in PDS cases but not in controls (p = 0.016). Immunohistochemical analysis of human donor eyes revealed abundant MRAP protein in the iris, the source of pigment in PDS. However, analysis of MRAP in additional cohorts (415 cases and 1645 controls) did not support an association with PDS. We also did not confirm a link between PMEL and PDS in our cohorts due to lack of reported mutations and similar frequency of the variants in PDS patients as in control subjects. CONCLUSIONS: We did not detect a statistical enrichment of mutations in melanosome-related genes in human PDS patients and we found conflicting data about the likely pathogenicity of MRAP mutations. PDS may have a complex genetic basis that is not easily unraveled with exome analyses.

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