Glaucoma

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Ichhpujani P, Thakur S, Kumar S, Singh RB. Juvenile Open Angle Glaucoma With Nonbullous Congenital Ichthyosiform Erythroderma. J Glaucoma 2018;27(11):e180-e182.Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Glaucoma in patients with nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NBCIE) is a rare entity that has not been described in a histologically confirmed case. We present a unique case of coexisting glaucoma, ichthyosis, and dwarfism that has not been previously described. METHODS: We present a case of NBCIE with glaucoma and dwarfism that presented to our outpatient department. The patient was referred for watering and photophobia that were due to an epithelial defect that was subsequently managed conservatively. Investigations revealed the existence of a constellation of findings that are presented here. RESULTS: NBCIE, glaucoma, and dwarfism represent a spectrum of diseases that seem to have a syndromic association. More gene linkage-based analysis are, however, needed to further confirm our observations. CONCLUSIONS: NBCIE, glaucoma, and dwarfism can often occur together and need to be assessed and managed individually. Early diagnosis of this spectrum can help improve patient management and quality of life. Dermatologists must get an ocular examination conducted for icthyoses patients.
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Jacobi A, van Zyl T. [Recent Research Efforts to Achieve Neuroprotection, Progression and Treatment of Glaucoma]. Klin Monbl Augenheilkd 2020;237(2):133-139.Abstract
Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to irreversible blindness over time. Its defining feature is the loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the eye and their axons in the optic nerve. Increased intraocular pressure (IOP) is a major risk factor for the development of glaucoma, but is neither necessary nor sufficient for the disease and its progression; this motivates research and development of new strategies for the detection and treatment of glaucoma that focus on neuroprotection - protection of RGCs from dying. In addition, for diagnosis and treatment by reducing IOP, new approaches have been developed in recent years. This article reviews current theories of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying glaucoma and recent research - with a focus on neuroprotection and current preclinical and clinical studies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma.
Jakobs TC. Ex Vivo Imaging of the Murine Optic Nerve Head. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2017;58(2):734.
Jakobs TC. Differential gene expression in glaucoma. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 2014;4(7):a020636.Abstract

In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell-matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system.

Jiang Y, Ondeck C. A Review of New Medications and Future Directions of Medical Therapies in Glaucoma. Semin Ophthalmol 2020;:1-7.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Treatment is still largely targeted at lowering intraocular pressure. Intraocular pressures can be lowered through a variety of topical medications, lasers and incisional surgeries. There are currently several classes of topical medications available in the US that are aimed at lowering intraocular pressure through a variety of different mechanisms. Additionally, there have been numerous different formulations and fixed-dose combination medications that offer greatly expanded treatment options over the last several years. The wide variety of topical medications aim to address the issues with compliance, effectiveness and side effect profile that vary among each individual patient and disease.  Purpose: Three new topical medications, netarsudil 0.02%, latanoprostene bunod 0.24% and fixed-dose combination netarsudil 0.02% - latanoprost 0.005% have been approved in the US market to treat glaucoma. This review article will summarize the studies looking at their effectiveness and side effect profiles and discuss their utilization in the treatment of glaucoma. Additionally, we will briefly discuss future directions of research in topical glaucoma medications. CONCLUSION: Three new topical glaucoma medications offer additional treatment options for patient with glaucoma. Further research is needed to better understand the utility of sustained release formulations in the treatment of glaucoma.
Joseph A, Pasquale LR. Attributes Associated with Adherence to Glaucoma Medical Therapy and its Effects on Glaucoma Outcomes: An Evidence-Based Review and Potential Strategies to Improve Adherence. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):86-90.Abstract

The treatment paradigm in glaucoma classically starts with exhausting all medical therapy prior to proceeding with laser or incisional surgery, although laser-first and surgery-first strategies have been explored in randomized clinical trials. Although glaucoma drops are proven to work well to lower intraocular pressure, slow the conversion from ocular hypertension, and slow the progression of disease in early open angle glaucoma, adherence to treatment is likely optimum in the randomized clinical trials that support these claims. In real-world scenarios, medical therapy often fails and practitioners are forced to proceed with more invasive treatment modalities to slow the progression of this blinding disease. This review aims to take an evidence-based approach to study the risk factors for poor adherence in glaucoma patients, to determine whether poor adherence is, in fact, associated with worse outcomes, and to seek potential strategies to improve adherence in these patients.

Junk AK, Chang TC, Vanner E, Chen T. Current Trends in Tonometry and Tonometer Tip Disinfection. J Glaucoma 2020;29(7):507-512.Abstract
PRECIS: A survey among members of the American Glaucoma Society (AGS) and the American Optometry Association (AOA) on tonometer preference and tonometer disinfection indicates a shift to disposable tonometer tips compared with 1987. PURPOSE: This survey's purpose was to determine how eye care providers responded to the 2008 Centers of Disease Control (CDC) tonometer disinfection guidelines, which recommend 10% hypochlorite (dilute bleach) for reusable tonometers. Tonometers measure the eye pressure when they touch the cornea, an essential part of the eye examination. METHODS: AGS and AOA members were surveyed on tonometer preference, tonometer use, disinfection process, disinfectants, disinfection timing, and tonometer damage. RESULTS: Survey responses from 79 AOA members and 197 AGS members are included. The Goldmann tonometer is considered most accurate (70, 89% AOA and 161, 82% AGS). It is preferred by 54 (70%) AOA and 193 (98%) AGS members. Many providers (165) use reusable Goldmann tonometer tips (77, 79% AOA, 88, 45% AGS), and most clean with 70% isopropyl alcohol wipes 59 (77%) AOA and 54 (61%) AGS. In summary, 126 of 276 participants (8, 10% AOA and 118, 60% AGS) follow CDC guidelines by using disposable tips (2 AOA and 109 AGS) or disinfecting reusable tips with 10% hypochlorite (6 AOA and 9 AGS). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of AGS providers follow current CDC tonometer disinfection guidelines by shifting to disposable Goldmann tonometer tips. Only a minority of providers who use reusable tonometer tips disinfect with dilute bleach. Continued education on proper tonometer disinfection is critical to prevent eye-care related infection due to improper disinfection.
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Kang JH, Boumenna T, Stein JD, Khawaja A, Rosner BA, Wiggs JL, Pasquale LR. Association of Statin Use and High Serum Cholesterol Levels With Risk of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma. JAMA Ophthalmol 2019;Abstract
Importance: The use of statins (hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors) has been associated with a lower risk of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG); however, results have been conflicting, and little is known about the association between high cholesterol levels and POAG. Objective: To assess the association of elevated cholesterol levels and statin use with incident POAG. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study used data collected biennially from participants aged 40 years or older who were free of glaucoma and reported eye examinations, within 3 population-based cohorts: the Nurses' Health Study (N = 50 710; followed up from 2000 to 2014), the Nurses' Health Study 2 (N = 62 992; 1999-2015), and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (N = 23 080; 2000-2014). Incident cases of POAG were confirmed by medical record review. The analyses were performed in January 2019. Exposures: Biennially updated self-reported information on elevated cholesterol level status, serum cholesterol levels, and duration of statin use. Main Outcomes and Measures: Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models on pooled data, with stratification by cohort. Results: Among the 136 782 participants in the 3 cohorts (113 702 women and 23 080 men), 886 incident cases of POAG were identified. Every 20-mg/dL increase in total serum cholesterol was associated with a 7% increase in risk of POAG (RR, 1.07 [95% CI, 1.02-1.11]; P = .004). Any self-reported history of elevated cholesterol was also associated with a higher risk of POAG (RR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.00-1.37]). A history of any statin use was associated with a 15% lower risk of POAG (RR, 0.85 [95% CI, 0.73-0.99]). Use of statins for 5 or more years vs never use of statins was associated with a 21% lower risk of POAG (RR, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.65-0.97]; P = .02 for linear trend). The association between use of statins for 5 or more years vs never use of statins and risk of POAG was more inverse in those who were older (≥65 years: RR, 0.70 [95% CI, 0.56-0.87] vs <65 years: RR, 1.05 [95% CI, 0.68-1.63]; P = .01 for interaction). Conclusions and Relevance: Among adults aged 40 years or older, higher serum cholesterol levels were associated with higher risk of POAG, while 5 or more years of statin use compared with never use of statins was associated with a lower risk of POAG.
Kang JH, Boumenna T, Stein JD, Khawaja A, Rosner BA, Wiggs JL, Pasquale LR. Notice of Retraction and Replacement. Kang et al. Association of statin use and high serum cholesterol levels with risk of primary open-angle glaucoma. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2019;137(7):756-765. JAMA Ophthalmol 2020;
Kang MH, Oh D-J, Kang J-heon, Rhee DJ. Regulation of SPARC by transforming growth factor β2 in human trabecular meshwork. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2013;54(4):2523-32.Abstract
PURPOSE: An increased aqueous level of TGF-β2 has been found in many primary open-angle glaucoma patients. Secreted Protein, Acidic, and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC)-null mice have a lower intraocular pressure. The mechanistic relationship between SPARC and TGF-β2 in trabecular meshwork (TM) is unknown. We hypothesized that TGF-β2 upregulates SPARC expression in TM. METHODS: Cultured TM cells were incubated with selective inhibitors for p38 MAP kinase (p38), Smad3, p42, JNK, RhoA, PI3K, or TGF-β2 receptor for 2 hours, and then TGF-β2 was added for 24 hours in serum-free media. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunoblot analysis were performed. Immunofluorescent microscopy was used to determine nuclear translocation of signaling proteins. Ad5.hSPARC and Lentiviral shRNA for p38 and Smad3 were constructed, and infected human TM cells. RESULTS: SPARC was upregulated by TGF-β2 in the human TM cells (3.8 ± 1.7-fold, n = 6, P = 0.01 for protein and 7.1 ± 3.7-fold, n = 6, P = 0.01 for mRNA), while upregulation of SPARC had no effect on TGF-β2. TGF-β2-induced SPARC expression was suppressed by inhibitors against p38 (-40.3 ± 20.9%, n = 10, P = 0.0001), Smad3 (-56.2 ± 18.9%, n = 10, P = 0.0001), JNK (-49.1 ± 24.6%, n = 10, P = 0.0001), and TGF-β2 receptor (-83.6 ± 14.4%, n = 6, P = 0.003). Phosphorylation and translocation of Smad3, p38, and MAPKAPK2 were detected at 30 minutes and 1 hour, respectively, following TGF-β2 treatment. Phosphorylation of JNK and c-jun was detected before TGF-β2 treatment. SPARC was suppressed 31 ± 13% (n = 5, P < 0.0001) by shRNA-p38 and 41 ± 3% (n = 5, P < 0.0001) by shRNA-Smad3. CONCLUSIONS: TGF-β2 upregulates SPARC expression in human TM through Smad-dependent (Smad2/3) or -independent (p38) signaling pathways. SPARC may be a downstream regulatory node of TGF-β2-mediated IOP elevation.
Kang JH, Rosner BA, Wiggs JL, Pasquale LR. Sex hormone levels and risk of primary open-angle glaucoma in postmenopausal women. Menopause 2018;25(10):1116-1123.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the relation of prediagnostic sex hormone levels in postmenopausal women with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and intraocular pressure (IOP). METHODS: Among postmenopausal participants of the Nurses' Health Study, POAG cases (n = 189; diagnosed 1990-2008) and controls (n = 189) were matched on age, fasting status, and postmenopausal hormone use at blood draw (1989-1990). Plasma concentrations of estrone sulfate, estradiol, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were assessed. The primary outcome was POAG; in secondary analyses, among cases only, we evaluated maximum untreated IOP at diagnosis. Multivariable-adjusted logistic/multiple linear regression models were used to evaluate tertiles (Ts) of biomarker levels and the two outcomes, adjusting for various potential confounders. RESULTS: We observed no significant associations of estrone, estradiol, sex hormone binding globulin, or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate with POAG risk or with maximum IOP at glaucoma diagnosis among cases. Suggestive significant associations were observed with highest testosterone and POAG risk (T3 vs T1 multivariable-adjusted odds ratio 1.84; 95% confidence interval 1.02, 3.33; P trend 0.10). Similarly, for maximum IOP at diagnosis among cases only (mean 8 years after blood draw), higher testosterone was significantly associated with higher IOP (multivariable-adjusted difference in IOP T3 vs T1 2.17 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval 0.34, 3.99; P trend 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, plasma sex hormone levels in postmenopausal women were not associated with POAG risk; however, a trend of higher testosterone levels being associated with higher POAG risk and higher IOP at diagnosis was observed and needs confirmation.
Kang JH, VoPham T, Laden F, Rosner BA, Wirostko B, Ritch R, Wiggs JL, Qureshi A, Nan H, Pasquale LR. Cohort Study of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer and the Risk of Exfoliation Glaucoma. J Glaucoma 2020;29(6):448-455.Abstract
PRECIS: In a cohort study of 120,307 participants with 25+ years of follow-up, a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was associated with a 40% higher exfoliation glaucoma (XFG) risk. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between NMSC (a marker of ultraviolet radiation exposure) and XFG. METHODS: We performed a cohort study of US women (n=79,102; 1980-2014) and men (n=41,205; 1986-2014), aged 40+ years and at risk for glaucoma who reported eye examinations. From 1984 (women)/1988 (men), we asked about basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma history separately; in prior years, we asked about any NMSC history in a single question. Squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed with histopathology reports while basal cell carcinoma and any early (<1984/<1988) NMSC history was self-reported. Incident XFG cases (362 women and 83 men) were confirmed with medical records. Using pooled data, we estimated multivariable-adjusted relative risks [MVRRs; 95% confidence intervals (CIs)] with Cox proportional hazards models that were stratified by age (in mo), 2-year time period at risk and average lifetime residential latitude. RESULTS: In multivariable-adjusted analyses, we observed a 40% higher XFG risk with any NMSC history (MVRR=1.40; 95% CI=1.08-1.82); the association was observed even with 4 and 8-year lags in NMSC history. Also, the NMSC association was stronger in younger (below 65 y; MVRR=2.56; 95% CI=1.62-4.05) versus older participants (65 y and above; MVRR=1.25; 95% CI=0.94-1.66; P for interaction=0.01) and those living in the northern latitudes (≥42°N; MVRR=1.92; 95% CI=1.28-2.88) versus more southern latitudes (<42°N; MVRR=1.19; 95% CI=0.86-1.66; P for interaction=0.04). CONCLUSION: NMSC was associated with higher XFG risk, particularly among younger participants and those living in the Northern US.
Kang JH, Loomis SJ, Rosner BA, Wiggs JL, Pasquale LR. Comparison of risk factor profiles for primary open angle glaucoma subtypes defined by pattern of visual field loss: a prospective study. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2015;Abstract

PURPOSE: We explored whether risk factor associations differed by primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) subtypes defined by visual field (VF) loss pattern (i.e., paracentral or peripheral). METHODS: We included 77,157 women in the Nurses Health Study and 42,773 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2010) and incident medical-record confirmed cases of paracentral (n=440) and peripheral (n=865) POAG subtypes. We evaluated African-heritage, glaucoma family history, body mass index (BMI), mean arterial blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, physical activity, smoking, caffeine and alcohol intakes. We used competing risk Cox regression analyses modeling age as the metameter and stratified by age, cohort and event type. We sequentially identified factors with the least significant differences in associations with POAG subtypes ("stepwise down" approach with P for heterogeneity [P-het]<0.10 as threshold). RESULTS: BMI was more inversely associated with the POAG paracentral VF loss subtype than the peripheral VF loss subtype (per 10 kg/m2; hazard ratio [HR]=0.67 [95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 0.52, 0.86] vs. HR=0.93 [95% CI: 0.78, 1.10]; P-het=0.03) as was smoking (per 10 pack-years; HR=0.92 [95% CI: 0.87, 0.98] vs. HR=0.98 [95% CI: 0.94, 1.01]; P-het=0.09). These findings were robust in sensitivity analyses using a "stepwise up" approach (identify factors that showed the most significant differences). Non-heterogeneous (p-het>0.10) adverse associations with both POAG subtypes were observed with glaucoma family history, diabetes, African-heritage, greater caffeine intake and higher mean arterial pressure. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that POAG with early paracentral VF loss has distinct as well as common determinants compared to POAG with peripheral VF loss.

Kang JH, Wiggs JL, Pasquale LR. Relation between time spent outdoors and exfoliation glaucoma or exfoliation glaucoma suspect. Am J Ophthalmol 2014;158(3):605-14.e1.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the relation between time spent outdoors at various life periods and risk of exfoliation glaucoma or exfoliation glaucoma suspect. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study in the United States. METHODS: Participants (49 033 women in the Nurses Health Study and 20 066 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study) were 60+ years old, were free of glaucoma and cataract, reported eye examinations, and completed questions about time spent outdoors in direct sunlight at midday at 3 life periods: high school to age 24 years, age 25-35 years, and age 36-59 years (asked in 2006 in women and 2008 in men). Participants were followed biennially with mailed questionnaires from 1980 women/1986 men to 2010. Incident cases (223 women and 38 men) were confirmed with medical records. Cohort-specific multivariable-adjusted rate ratios from Cox proportional hazards models were estimated and pooled with meta-analysis. RESULTS: Although no association was observed with greater time spent outdoors in the ages of 25-35 or ages 36-59 years, the pooled multivariable-adjusted rate ratios for ≥11 hours per week spent outdoors in high school to age 24 years compared with ≤5 hours per week was 2.00 (95% confidence interval = 1.30, 3.08; P for linear trend = .001). In women, this association was stronger in those who resided in the southern geographic tier in young adulthood (P for interaction = .07). CONCLUSIONS: Greater time spent outdoors in young adulthood was associated with risk of exfoliation glaucoma or exfoliation glaucoma suspect, supporting an etiologic role of early exposures to climatic factors.
Kang JH, VoPham T, Laden F, Rosner BA, Wirostko B, Ritch R, Wiggs JL, Qureshi A, Nan H, Pasquale LR. Cohort Study of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer and the Risk of Exfoliation Glaucoma. J Glaucoma 2020;Abstract
PRECIS: In a cohort study of 120,307 participants with 25+ years of follow-up, a history of non-melanoma skin cancer was associated with a 40% higher exfoliation glaucoma risk. PURPOSE: To evaluate the relationship between non-melanoma skin cancer (a marker of ultraviolet radiation exposure) and exfoliation glaucoma (XFG). METHODS: We performed a cohort study of US women (n=79,102; 1980-2014) and men (n=41,205; 1986-2014), aged 40+ years and at risk for glaucoma who reported eye exams. From 1984 (women)/1988 (men), we asked about basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) history separately; in prior years, we asked about any non-melanoma skin cancer history in a single question. SCC was confirmed with histopathology reports while BCC and any early (<1984/<1988) non-melanoma skin cancer history was self-reported. Incident XFG cases (362 women and 83 men) were confirmed with medical records. Using pooled data, we estimated multivariable-adjusted relative risks (MVRR; 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) with Cox proportional hazards models that were stratified by age (in months), 2-year time period at risk and average lifetime residential latitude. RESULTS: In multivariable-adjusted analyses, we observed a 40% higher XFG risk with any non-melanoma skin cancer history (MVRR=1.40; 95% CI=1.08,1.82); the association was observed even with 4 and 8 year lags in non-melanoma skin cancer history. Also, the non-melanoma skin cancer association was stronger in younger (<65▒y; MVRR=2.56; 95% CI=1.62,4.05) versus older participants (≥65▒y; MVRR=1.25; 95% CI=0.94,1.66; p for interaction=0.01) and those living in northern latitudes (≥42° north; MVRR=1.92; 95% CI=1.28,2.88) versus more southern latitudes (<42° north; MVRR=1.19; 95% CI=0.86,1.66; p for interaction=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Non-melanoma skin cancer was associated with higher XFG risk, particularly among younger participants and those living in Northern US.
Kang JH, Loomis SJ, Yaspan BL, Bailey JC, Weinreb RN, Lee RK, Lichter PR, Budenz DL, Liu Y, Realini T, Gaasterland D, Gaasterland T, Friedman DS, McCarty CA, Moroi SE, Olson L, Schuman JS, Singh K, Vollrath D, Wollstein G, Zack DJ, Brilliant M, Sit AJ, Christen WG, Fingert J, Forman JP, Buys ES, Kraft P, Zhang K, Allingham RR, Pericak-Vance MA, Richards JE, Hauser MA, Haines JL, Wiggs JL, Pasquale LR. Vascular tone pathway polymorphisms in relation to primary open-angle glaucoma. Eye (Lond) 2014;28(6):662-71.Abstract
AIMS: Vascular perfusion may be impaired in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG); thus, we evaluated a panel of markers in vascular tone-regulating genes in relation to POAG. METHODS: We used Illumina 660W-Quad array genotype data and pooled P-values from 3108 POAG cases and 3430 controls from the combined National Eye Institute Glaucoma Human Genetics Collaboration consortium and Glaucoma Genes and Environment studies. Using information from previous literature and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways, we compiled single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 186 vascular tone-regulating genes. We used the 'Pathway Analysis by Randomization Incorporating Structure' analysis software, which performed 1000 permutations to compare the overall pathway and selected genes with comparable randomly generated pathways and genes in their association with POAG. RESULTS: The vascular tone pathway was not associated with POAG overall or POAG subtypes, defined by the type of visual field loss (early paracentral loss (n=224 cases) or only peripheral loss (n=993 cases)) (permuted P≥0.20). In gene-based analyses, eight were associated with POAG overall at permuted P<0.001: PRKAA1, CAV1, ITPR3, EDNRB, GNB2, DNM2, HFE, and MYL9. Notably, six of these eight (the first six listed) code for factors involved in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, and three of these six (CAV1, ITPR3, and EDNRB) were also associated with early paracentral loss at P<0.001, whereas none of the six genes reached P<0.001 for peripheral loss only. DISCUSSION: Although the assembled vascular tone SNP set was not associated with POAG, genes that code for local factors involved in setting vascular tone were associated with POAG.
Kang JH, Wu J, Cho E, Ogata S, Jacques P, Taylor A, Chiu C-J, Wiggs JL, Seddon JM, Hankinson SE, Schaumberg DA, Pasquale LR. Contribution of the Nurses' Health Study to the Epidemiology of Cataract, Age-Related Macular Degeneration, and Glaucoma. Am J Public Health 2016;106(9):1684-9.Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) to understanding the genetic and lifestyle factors that influence the risk of cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. METHODS: We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS between 1976 and 2016. RESULTS: The NHS has helped to elucidate the roles of genetics, lifestyle factors (e.g., cigarette smoking associated with cataract extraction and age-related macular degeneration), medical conditions (e.g., diabetes associated with cataract extraction and glaucoma), and dietary factors (e.g., greater carotenoid intake and lower glycemic diet associated with lower risk of age-related macular degeneration) in the etiology of degree and progression of lens opacities, cataract extraction, age-related macular degeneration, primary open-angle glaucoma, and exfoliation glaucoma. CONCLUSIONS: The findings from the NHS, combined with those of other studies, have provided compelling evidence to support public health recommendations for helping to prevent age-related eye diseases: abstinence from cigarette smoking, maintenance of healthy weight and diabetes prevention, and a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables.

Kang JH, Loomis SJ, Rosner BA, Wiggs JL, Pasquale LR. Author Response: Comparison of Risk Factor Profiles for Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Subtypes Defined by Pattern of Visual Field Loss: True Risk Factors or Arbituary Definition?. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2015;56(11):6532-3.
Kempen JH, Van Natta ML, Friedman DS, Altaweel MM, Ansari H, Dunn JP, Elner SG, Holbrook JT, Lim LL, Sugar EA, Jabs DA, and Group MUST (MUST) TF-up SR. Incidence and Outcome of Uveitic Glaucoma in Eyes With Intermediate, Posterior, or Panuveitis Followed up to 10 Years After Randomization to Fluocinolone Acetonide Implant or Systemic Therapy. Am J Ophthalmol 2020;219:303-316.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term risk and outcomes of glaucoma in eyes with intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis managed with systemic or fluocinolone acetonide (0.59 mg, "implant") therapy. DESIGN: Prospective Follow-up of the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Clinical Trial Cohort. METHODS: Patients with intermediate, posterior, or panuveitis randomized to implant or systemic therapy (corticosteroid plus immunosuppression in >90%) were followed prospectively for glaucoma incidence and outcome. RESULTS: Among 405 uveitic at-risk eyes of 232 patients (median follow-up = 6.9 years), 40% (79/196) of eyes assigned and treated with implant and 8% (17/209) of eyes assigned and treated with systemic therapy (censoring eyes receiving an implant on implantation) developed glaucoma (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.2, 10.8; P < .001). Adjustment for intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation during follow-up only partially mitigated the association of implant treatment with glaucoma incidence: HR = 3.1 (95% CI 1.6, 6.0); P = .001. Among 112 eyes of 83 patients developing glaucoma, the 5-year cumulative incidence following diagnosis of sustained (2 or more consecutive visits) worsening of mean deviation by ≥6 dB was 20% (95% CI 12%, 33%); 5-year cumulative incidence of sustained worsening of cup-to-disc ratio by ≥0.2 was 26% (95% CI 17%, 39%). CONCLUSIONS: The implant has substantially higher risk of glaucoma than systemic therapy, a difference not entirely explained by posttreatment IOP elevation. Management of IOP elevation was effective in preventing worsening of glaucoma for the large majority of cases, but even under expert clinical management, some glaucoma worsened. Uveitis cases should be monitored carefully for IOP elevation and glaucoma indefinitely.
Khawaja AP, Cooke Bailey JN, Kang JH, Allingham RR, Hauser MA, Brilliant M, Budenz DL, Christen WG, Fingert J, Gaasterland D, Gaasterland T, Kraft P, Lee RK, Lichter PR, Liu Y, Medeiros F, Moroi SE, Richards JE, Realini T, Ritch R, Schuman JS, Scott WK, Singh K, Sit AJ, Vollrath D, Wollstein G, Zack DJ, Zhang K, Pericak-Vance M, Weinreb RN, Haines JL, Pasquale LR, Wiggs JL. Assessing the Association of Mitochondrial Genetic Variation With Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Using Gene-Set Analyses. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2016;57(11):5046-5052.Abstract

Purpose: Recent studies indicate that mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the pathogenesis of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). In this study, we examined the association between POAG and common variations in gene-encoding mitochondrial proteins. Methods: We examined genetic data from 3430 POAG cases and 3108 controls derived from the combination of the GLAUGEN and NEIGHBOR studies. We constructed biological-system coherent mitochondrial nuclear-encoded protein gene-sets by intersecting the MitoCarta database with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. We examined the mitochondrial gene-sets for association with POAG and with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and high-tension glaucoma (HTG) subsets using Pathway Analysis by Randomization Incorporating Structure. Results: We identified 22 KEGG pathways with significant mitochondrial protein-encoding gene enrichment, belonging to six general biological classes. Among the pathway classes, mitochondrial lipid metabolism was associated with POAG overall (P = 0.013) and with NTG (P = 0.0006), and mitochondrial carbohydrate metabolism was associated with NTG (P = 0.030). Examining the individual KEGG pathway mitochondrial gene-sets, fatty acid elongation and synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, both lipid metabolism pathways, were significantly associated with POAG (P = 0.005 and P = 0.002, respectively) and NTG (P = 0.0004 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Butanoate metabolism, a carbohydrate metabolism pathway, was significantly associated with POAG (P = 0.004), NTG (P = 0.001), and HTG (P = 0.010). Conclusions: We present an effective approach for assessing the contributions of mitochondrial genetic variation to open-angle glaucoma. Our findings support a role for mitochondria in POAG pathogenesis and specifically point to lipid and carbohydrate metabolism pathways as being important.

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