Pediatric Ophthalmology

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Pivodic A, Hård A-L, Löfqvist C, Smith LEH, Wu C, Bründer M-C, Lagrèze WA, Stahl A, Holmström G, Albertsson-Wikland K, Johansson H, Nilsson S, Hellström A. Individual Risk Prediction for Sight-Threatening Retinopathy of Prematurity Using Birth Characteristics. JAMA Ophthalmol 2019;:1-9.Abstract
Importance: To prevent blindness, repeated infant eye examinations are performed to detect severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), yet only a small fraction of those screened need treatment. Early individual risk stratification would improve screening timing and efficiency and potentially reduce the risk of blindness. Objectives: To create and validate an easy-to-use prediction model using only birth characteristics and to describe a continuous hazard function for ROP treatment. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this retrospective cohort study, Swedish National Patient Registry data from infants screened for ROP (born between January 1, 2007, and August 7, 2018) were analyzed with Poisson regression for time-varying data (postnatal age, gestational age [GA], sex, birth weight, and important interactions) to develop an individualized predictive model for ROP treatment (called DIGIROP-Birth [Digital ROP]). The model was validated internally and externally (in US and European cohorts) and compared with 4 published prediction models. Main Outcomes and Measures: The study outcome was ROP treatment. The measures were estimated momentary and cumulative risks, hazard ratios with 95% CIs, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (hereinafter referred to as AUC), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Results: Among 7609 infants (54.6% boys; mean [SD] GA, 28.1 [2.1] weeks; mean [SD] birth weight, 1119 [353] g), 442 (5.8%) were treated for ROP, including 142 (40.1%) treated of 354 born at less than 24 gestational weeks. Irrespective of GA, the risk for receiving ROP treatment increased during postnatal weeks 8 through 12 and decreased thereafter. Validations of DIGIROP-Birth for 24 to 30 weeks' GA showed high predictive ability for the model overall (AUC, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.89-0.92] for internal validation, 0.94 [95% CI, 0.90-0.98] for temporal validation, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.84-0.89] for US external validation, and 0.90 [95% CI, 0.85-0.95] for European external validation) by calendar periods and by race/ethnicity. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were numerically at least as high as those obtained from CHOP-ROP (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia-ROP), OMA-ROP (Omaha-ROP), WINROP (weight, insulinlike growth factor 1, neonatal, ROP), and CO-ROP (Colorado-ROP), models requiring more complex postnatal data. Conclusions and Relevance: This study validated an individualized prediction model for infants born at 24 to 30 weeks' GA, enabling early risk prediction of ROP treatment based on birth characteristics data. Postnatal age rather than postmenstrual age was a better predictive variable for the temporal risk of ROP treatment. The model is an accessible online application that appears to be generalizable and to have at least as good test statistics as other models requiring longitudinal neonatal data not always readily available to ophthalmologists.
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Raghuram A, Gowrisankaran S, Swanson E, Zurakowski D, Hunter DG, Waber DP. Frequency of Visual Deficits in Children With Developmental Dyslexia. JAMA Ophthalmol 2018;136(10):1089-1095.Abstract
Importance: Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a specific learning disability of neurobiological origin whose core cognitive deficit is widely believed to involve language (phonological) processing. Although reading is also a visual task, the potential role of vision in DD has been controversial, and little is known about the integrity of visual function in individuals with DD. Objective: To assess the frequency of visual deficits (specifically vergence, accommodation, and ocular motor tracking) in children with DD compared with a control group of typically developing readers. Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective, uncontrolled observational study was conducted from May 28 to October 17, 2016, in an outpatient ophthalmology ambulatory clinic among 29 children with DD and 33 typically developing (TD) children. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcomes were frequencies of deficits in vergence (amplitude, fusional ranges, and facility), accommodation (amplitude, facility, and accuracy), and ocular motor tracking (Developmental Eye Movement test and Visagraph eye tracker). Results: Among the children with DD (10 girls and 19 boys; mean [SD] age, 10.3 [1.2] years) and the TD group (21 girls and 12 boys; mean [SD] age, 9.4 [1.4] years), accommodation deficits were more frequent in the DD group than the TD group (16 [55%] vs 3 [9%]; difference = 46%; 95% CI, 25%-67%; P < .001). For ocular motor tracking, 18 children in the DD group (62%) had scores in the impaired range (in the Developmental Eye Movement test, Visagraph, or both) vs 5 children in the TD group (15%) (difference, 47%; 95% CI, 25%-69%; P < .001). Vergence deficits occurred in 10 children in the DD group (34%) and 5 children in the TD group (15%) (difference, 19%; 95% CI, -2.2% to 41%; P = .08). In all, 23 children in the DD group (79%) and 11 children in the TD group (33%) had deficits in 1 or more domain of visual function (difference, 46%; 95% CI, 23%-69%; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that deficits in visual function are far more prevalent in school-aged children with DD than in TD readers, but the possible cause and clinical relevance of these deficits are uncertain. Further study is needed to determine the extent to which treating these deficits can improve visual symptoms and/or reading parameters.
Raghuram A, Hunter DG, Waber DP. Accurately Assessing Visual Deficits in Children With Developmental Dyslexia-Reply. JAMA Ophthalmol 2019;
Raghuram A, Hunter DG, Gowrisankaran S, Waber DP. Self-reported visual symptoms in children with developmental dyslexia. Vision Res 2019;155:11-16.Abstract
Although there are many anecdotal reports of children with developmental dyslexia complaining of vision symptoms when reading, empirical studies are lacking. The primary aim of the present study was to document self-reported vision-related symptoms in children with developmental dyslexia and typically reading peers. We also explored whether vision symptoms were correlated with sensorimotor measures of vergence, accommodation and ocular motor tracking skills. Using a prospective group comparison observational design, we assessed 28 children with developmental dyslexia (DD) and 33 typically reading children (TR) 7-11 years of age. Participants completed psychoeducational testing, a comprehensive sensorimotor eye examination, and the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS), which includes 9 items pertaining to vision-related symptoms (CISS-V) and 6 that could have cognitive influence (CISS-C). CISS-V were significantly greater in DD than TR children. Ocular motor tracking, assessed by an infra-red limbal eye tracker while reading text, was most clearly associated with the visual symptoms, but only within the DD group. Vision-related symptom surveys followed by a comprehensive eye examination with detailed evaluation of sensorimotor functioning for those who report a high prevalence of symptoms may be clinically relevant for children with DD.
Raghuram A, Cotter S, Gowrisankaran S, Kanji J, Howell DR, Meehan WP, Shah AS. Post-Concussion: Receded Near Point of Convergence is Not Diagnostic of Convergence Insufficiency. Am J Ophthalmol 2019;Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the frequency of receded near point of convergence (NPC) in patients with chronic concussion-related symptoms, and among those with receded NPC to enumerate the frequency of convergence insufficiency and other oculomotor disorders. STUDY: Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study METHODS: Clinic charts were retrospectively reviewed for the prior 3.5 years to identify all patients <21 years old who were >28 days post-concussion, had chronic concussion-related symptoms, had normal visual acuity, and received a comprehensive sensorimotor examination. The frequency of receded NPC and oculomotor diagnoses were determined. RESULTS: Of the 83 eligible patients, 74 (89%) had receded NPC. Of these, 70 (95%) had oculomotor disorders; 30 (41%) had disorders of accommodation only, 21 (28%) had convergence insufficiency and accommodation deficits, and 6 (8%) had convergence insufficiency only. Six (8%) had a convergence deficit other than convergence insufficiency (all with concurrent accommodative disorders), 4 (5%) had both a non-specific vergence dysfunction and accommodation deficits, 2 (3%) had convergence excess only, and 1 (1%) had both convergence excess and accommodative deficits. CONCLUSION: A receded NPC was present in the majority of young patients with chronic post-concussion symptoms. Associated with numerous underlying oculomotor dysfunctions, the clinical finding of a receded NPC is not synonymous with the diagnosis of convergence insufficiency. Because treatment options for the various oculomotor dysfunctions differ, it is prudent that these patients undergo a thorough examination of their vergence and accommodative systems so that an accurate diagnosis can be made and appropriate treatment prescribed.
Rhiu S, Michalak S, Phanphruk W, Hunter DG. Anomalous Vertical Deviations in Attempted Abduction Occur in the Majority of Patients With Esotropic Duane Syndrome. Am J Ophthalmol 2018;195:171-175.Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe a phenomenon, depression in attempted abduction, not previously recognized as a feature of Duane syndrome (DS). DESIGN: Retrospective, observational case series. METHODS: Setting: Institutional practice. PATIENT POPULATION: Patients diagnosed with esotropic DS at Boston Children's Hospital from 2002 to 2015. Patients with clinical photographs documenting horizontal gaze were included. Patients with prior strabismus surgery were excluded. OBSERVATION PROCEDURES: Patients were classified into 3 groups according to their vertical eye position in attempted abduction: midline group, depression group, and elevation group. Group assignment was performed by 3 independent ophthalmologists. Baseline characteristics, eye movement, and ocular deviation were compared among the 3 groups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Horizontal and vertical deviation on attempted abduction in the DS eye. RESULTS: Depression in attempted abduction was present in 74 of 113 unilateral patients (66%) and 18 of 42 gradable eyes (43%) of bilateral patients. Abduction limitation was significantly less severe in the midline group (median: -3.0) than in the depression group (median: -4.0) (P = .01). Vertical deviation in attempted abduction was more severe in the elevation group than in the depression group (P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: Depression of the eye in attempted abduction has not been widely described, yet it is present in the majority of DS patients. It is more likely to occur with more severe abduction limitation. This phenomenon is likely another form of dysinnervation in DS, the result either of anomalous vertical rectus muscle activation or asymmetric lateral rectus muscle innervation during attempted abduction. Awareness of vertical deviation in attempted abduction may facilitate surgical planning in affected patients.
Roohipoor R, Alvarez R, Brodowska K, Yaseri M, Kloek C, Riazi M, Nourinia R, Nikkhah H, Prajna VN, Krishnan C, Tuli S, Green L, Srikumaran D, Shah AS, Mantagos IS, Chiang M, Chan PRV, Loewenstein J. Evaluation of computer-based retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) education for ophthalmology residents: a randomized, controlled, multicenter study. J AAPOS 2019;Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of a computer-based training program-Massachusetts Eye & Ear ROP Trainer-on residents' knowledge of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) management. METHODS: In this prospective, randomized study, ophthalmology residents from nine different training programs consented to participate. Those who completed the study were randomly assigned to either the Trainer or the control group. The ROP Trainer was created using clinical cases encompassing the stages of ROP in digital pictures and videos. It includes sections on screening decisions, examination techniques, and diagnosis, and a reference section with the expert video clips and a searchable image library. Subjects in the control group were asked to study standard print material on ROP. A pre- and post-test, consisting of theoretical and practical (diagnosis) questions, and a post-intervention satisfaction test were administered. Accuracy of ROP diagnosis was assessed. RESULTS: A total of 180 residents agreed to participate, of whom 60 completed the study. Residents in the Trainer group had statistically significant improvements (P = 0.003) in ROP knowledge and diagnostic ability (P = 0.005). Residents randomized to the Trainer group were more satisfied with the training materials than were those in the control group. There was no significant difference in improving knowledge by year of training, sex, or country. Considering all training levels, a statistically significant increase was observed in sensitivity for the diagnosis of preplus or worse, zone I or II, ROP stage, category, and aggressive posterior ROP in the Trainer group. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the Trainer was shown to significantly improve ROP knowledge and diagnostic skills of residents, regardless of sex, year, of training, or country.
Roohipoor R, Karkhaneh R, Farahani A, Ebrahimiadib N, Modjtahedi B, Fotouhi A, Yaseri M, Khodabande A, Zarei M, Imani Fuladi M, Taheri A, Riazi Esfahani M, Loewenstein J. Retinopathy of prematurity screening criteria in Iran: new screening guidelines. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2016;101(4):F288-93.Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To test the applicability of existing retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) guidelines on Iranian patients and to develop novel ROP screening criteria in Iran. METHODS: Both eyes of 1932 infants born ≤37 weeks of gestation and/or weighting ≤3000 g were included in this prospective cohort study that was conducted across nine neonatal intensive care units and a tertiary eye hospital ROP clinic. The patients were examined for ROP and the need for treatment (type 1 ROP or worse). All the patients were screened 4 weeks after birth or at 31 weeks of postmenstrual age, whichever was later. The patients were followed until retinal vascularisation was completed or the patients reached 50 weeks of gestational age (GA) without prethreshold ROP. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the best screening criteria for ROP. Screening criteria from other countries were applied to our patient data to determine their ability to appropriately detect ROP. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Patients with ROP requiring treatment. RESULTS: The mean GA±SD and birth weight (BW)±SD of the screened patients were 32±2.7 weeks and 1713±516 g, respectively. Using criteria of GA≤32 weeks or BW ≤2000 yielded sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 26.7%, respectively, for treatment requiring ROP regardless of clinical comorbidities. Using screening recommendations of American Academy of Pediatrics would miss 25.4% of ROP and 8.4%ROP requiring treatment in our cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Other countries screening recommendations would result in a significant amount of missed cases of treatment requiring ROP when applied to Iran. As a result, we have proposed new guidelines for premature babies in Iran.

Rosenblatt TR, Ji MH, Vail D, Ludwig CA, Al-Moujahed A, Pasricha MV, Callaway NF, Kumm J, Moshfeghi DM. Key factors in a rigorous longitudinal image-based assessment of retinopathy of prematurity. Sci Rep 2021;11(1):5369.Abstract
To describe a database of longitudinally graded telemedicine retinal images to be used as a comparator for future studies assessing grader recall bias and ability to detect typical progression (e.g. International Classification of Retinopathy of Prematurity (ICROP) stages) as well as incremental changes in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Cohort comprised of retinal images from 84 eyes of 42 patients who were sequentially screened for ROP over 6 consecutive weeks in a telemedicine program and then followed to vascular maturation or treatment, and then disease stabilization. De-identified retinal images across the 6 weekly exams (2520 total images) were graded by an ROP expert based on whether ROP had improved, worsened, or stayed the same compared to the prior week's images, corresponding to an overall clinical "gestalt" score. Subsequently, we examined which parameters might have influenced the examiner's ability to detect longitudinal change; images were graded by the same ROP expert by image view (central, inferior, nasal, superior, temporal) and by retinal components (vascular tortuosity, vascular dilation, stage, hemorrhage, vessel growth), again determining if each particular retinal component or ROP in each image view had improved, worsened, or stayed the same compared to the prior week's images. Agreement between gestalt scores and view, component, and component by view scores was assessed using percent agreement, absolute agreement, and Cohen's weighted kappa statistic to determine if any of the hypothesized image features correlated with the ability to predict ROP disease trajectory in patients. The central view showed substantial agreement with gestalt scores (κ = 0.63), with moderate agreement in the remaining views. Of retinal components, vascular tortuosity showed the most overall agreement with gestalt (κ = 0.42-0.61), with only slight to fair agreement for all other components. This is a well-defined ROP database graded by one expert in a real-world setting in a masked fashion that correlated with the actual (remote in time) exams and known outcomes. This provides a foundation for subsequent study of telemedicine's ability to longitudinally assess ROP disease trajectory, as well as for potential artificial intelligence approaches to retinal image grading, in order to expand patient access to timely, accurate ROP screening.
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Saldaris J, Weisenberg J, Pestana-Knight E, Marsh ED, Suter B, Rajaraman R, Heidary G, Olson HE, Devinsky O, Price D, Jacoby P, Leonard H, Benke TA, Demarest S, Downs J. Content Validation of Clinician-Reported Items for a Severity Measure for CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder. J Child Neurol 2021;:8830738211019576.Abstract
CDKL5 deficiency disorder (CDD) results in early-onset seizures and severe developmental impairments. A CDD clinical severity assessment (CCSA) was previously developed with clinician and parent-report items to capture information on a range of domains. Consistent with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines, content validation is the first step in evaluating the psychometric properties of an outcome measure. The aim of this study was to validate the content of the clinician-reported items in the CCSA (CCSA-Clinician). Eight neurologists leading the USA CDD Center of Excellence clinics were interviewed using the "think aloud" technique to critique 26 clinician-reported items. Common themes were aggregated, and a literature search of related assessments informed item modifications. The clinicians then participated in 2 consensus meetings to review themes and finalize the items. A consensus was achieved for the content of the CCSA-Clinician. Eight of the original items were omitted, 11 items were added, and the remaining 18 items were revised. The final 29 items were classified into 2 domains: functioning and neurologic impairments. This study enabled refinement of the CCSA-Clinician and provided evidence for its content validity. This preliminary validation is essential before field testing and further validation, in order to advance the instrument toward clinical trial readiness.
Scelfo C, Mantagos IS. Neurotrophic Keratopathy in Pediatric Patients. Semin Ophthalmol 2021;36(4):289-295.Abstract
Purpose: This review provides an overview of the causes and treatment of neurotrophic keratopathy in the pediatric population.Methods: A thorough review of the current literature discussing neurotrophic keratopathy was conducted then summarized.Results:Fourty-nine papers were reviewed. Congenital and acquired causes of neurotrophic keratopathy exist in the pediatric population. Both medical and surgical approaches to treatment have been trialed, albeit to a limited extent, in pediatric patients. Conservative treatment includes topical lubrication and antibiotics to prevent concurrent infectious ulcer formation. Various neurotrophic factors have been trialed in the form of serum drops to restore corneal sensation when conservative measures fail. Surgically, different corneal neurotization techniques have been developed whereby a donor nerve is routed to the anesthetized cornea to restore innervation and sensation. Conclusions: Advances in the treatment of neurotrophic keratopathy have made corneal reinnervation and restoration of vision more easily attainable in pediatric patients.
Shaaban S, MacKinnon S, Andrews C, Staffieri SE, Maconachie GDE, Chan W-M, Whitman MC, Morton SU, Yazar S, Macgregor S, Elder JE, Traboulsi EI, Gottlob I, Hewitt AW, Hewitt AW, Hunter DG, Mackey DA, Engle EC. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies a Susceptibility Locus for Comitant Esotropia and Suggests a Parent-of-Origin Effect. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2018;59(10):4054-4064.Abstract
Purpose: To identify genetic variants conferring susceptibility to esotropia. Esotropia is the most common form of comitant strabismus, has its highest incidence in European ancestry populations, and is believed to be inherited as a complex trait. Methods: White European American discovery cohorts with nonaccommodative (826 cases and 2991 controls) or accommodative (224 cases and 749 controls) esotropia were investigated. White European Australian and United Kingdom cohorts with nonaccommodative (689 cases and 1448 controls) or accommodative (66 cases and 264 controls) esotropia were tested for replication. We performed a genome-wide case-control association study using a mixed linear additive model. Meta-analyses of discovery and replication cohorts were then conducted. Results: A significant association with nonaccommodative esotropia was discovered (odds ratio [OR] = 1.41, P = 2.84 × 10-09) and replicated (OR = 1.23, P = 0.01) at rs2244352 [T] located within intron 1 of the WRB (tryptophan rich basic protein) gene on chromosome 21 (meta-analysis OR = 1.33, P = 9.58 × 10-11). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is differentially methylated, and there is a statistically significant skew toward paternal inheritance in the discovery cohort. Meta-analysis of the accommodative discovery and replication cohorts identified an association with rs912759 [T] (OR = 0.59, P = 1.89 × 10-08), an intergenic SNP on chromosome 1p31.1. Conclusions: This is the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify significant associations in esotropia and suggests a parent-of-origin effect. Additional cohorts will permit replication and extension of these findings. Future studies of rs2244352 and WRB should provide insight into pathophysiological mechanisms underlying comitant strabismus.
Shazly TA, Al-Hussaini AK. Pediatric ocular injuries from airsoft toy guns. J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 2012;49(1):54-7.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report ocular injuries caused by airsoft guns in children. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of pediatric patients who sustained ocular injuries related to airsoft guns between November 2005 and December 2007. Place of trauma, presenting symptoms and signs, surgical interventions performed, and final visual outcome were reviewed. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients with a mean age of 8.8 ± 4.0 years (range: 1.5 to 18 years) were examined; 28 were boys (87.5%). Presenting visual acuity ranged from hand motions to 20/20 and could not be assessed in 2 patients. Hyphema was a common finding that was present in 24 cases, corneal abrasions were present in 10 cases, and raised intraocular pressure was present in 7 cases. Seven patients presented with traumatic cataract, and two had iridodialysis. Immediate surgical intervention was performed in 7 patients and 7 patients were scheduled for elective surgery. The patients presented after an average of 1.9 ± 1.9 days (range: 4 hours to 6 days) after the injury. Average follow-up was 18 days (range: 7 days to 5 months). Final visual acuity was 20/200 or worse in 5 patients, 20/40 or better in 23 patients, and could not be assessed in 2 cases. CONCLUSION: Airsoft guns can cause a variety of serious injuries, sometimes necessitating operative intervention. The long-term morbidity from some of these injuries is significant. Airsoft guns are capable of inflicting serious and permanent ocular damage.
Sheldon CA, Paley GL, Xiao R, Kesler A, Eyal O, Ko MW, Boisvert CJ, Avery RA, Salpietro V, Phillips PH, Heidary G, McCormack SE, Liu GT. Pediatric Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension: Age, Gender, and Anthropometric Features at Diagnosis in a Large, Retrospective, Multisite Cohort. Ophthalmology 2016;123(11):2424-2431.Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine anthropometric and maturational characteristics at diagnosis in pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). DESIGN: Retrospective, international, multisite study. PARTICIPANTS: Pediatric patients (2-18 years of age at diagnosis) with IIH. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Body mass index (BMI), height, and weight Z-scores; sexual maturation. METHODS: Cases of IIH were identified retrospectively based on diagnostic code, pediatric neuro-ophthalmologist databases, or both and updated diagnostic criteria (2013) were applied to confirm definite IIH. Anthropometric measurements were converted into age- and gender-specific height, weight, and BMI Z-scores CDC 2000 growth charts. When available, sexual maturation was noted. RESULTS: Two hundred thirty-three cases of definite IIH were identified across 8 sites. In boys, a moderate association between age and BMI Z-scores was noted (Pearson's correlation coefficient, 0.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.66; P < 0.001; n = 72), and in girls, a weak association was noted (Pearson's correlation coefficient, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.20-0.47; P < 0.001; n = 161). The average patient was more likely to be overweight at diagnosis at age 6.7 years in girls and 8.7 years in boys, and obese at diagnosis at age 12.5 years in girls and 12.4 years in boys. Compared with age- and gender-matched reference values, early adolescent patients were taller for age (P = 0.002 in girls and P = 0.02 in boys). Data on Tanner staging, menarchal status, or both were available in 25% of cases (n = 57/233). Prepubertal participants (n = 12) had lower average BMI Z-scores (0.95±1.98) compared with pubertal participants (n = 45; 1.92±0.60), but this result did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.09). CONCLUSIONS: With updated diagnostic criteria and pediatric-specific assessments, the present study identifies 3 subgroups of pediatric IIH: a young group that is not overweight, an early adolescent group that is either overweight or obese, and a late adolescent group that is mostly obese. Data also suggest that the early adolescent group with IIH may be taller than age- and gender-matched reference values. Understanding these features of pediatric IIH may help to illuminate the complex pathogenesis of this condition.

Shoshany TN, Robson CD, Hunter DG. Anomalous superior oblique muscles and tendons in congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles. J AAPOS 2019;23(6):325.e1-325.e6.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the finding of anomalous superior oblique muscles in congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM), a feature not previously emphasized in this condition. METHODS: The medical records of all patients clinically or genetically diagnosed with CFEOM at Boston Children's Hospital between 2010 and 2018 were reviewed retrospectively. Those who underwent strabismus surgery during the study period were included in the analysis. Baseline patient characteristics, type of CFEOM, results of genetic testing, and intraoperative features of the superior oblique muscle or tendon were recorded. RESULTS: Of 24 patients identified (age range, 1 month to 62 years), 10 (42%) had genetically confirmed CFEOM, and 22 underwent strabismus surgery, 14 (64%) involving the superior oblique muscle. Of these, 7 (50%) had anomalously inserted tendons (most commonly attached nasal to the superior rectus muscle), whereas 7 (50%) had increased superior oblique muscle tension. CONCLUSIONS: Half of CFEOM patients who underwent superior oblique surgery had abnormally inserted superior oblique tendons, and 50% had tight muscles or abnormally thin tendons, findings that have not been well-characterized in this condition. The findings suggest that abnormal insertion of the superior oblique muscles and tendons are additional features of the disease process in CFEOM that have not been described previously. These features may contribute to the severe upgaze limitation in CFEOM and highlight the importance of superior oblique tenotomy in surgical management.
Shoshany TN, Michalak SM, Chinn RN, Staffa SJ, Hunter DG. Evaluating Amblyopia Treatment Success Using the American Academy of Ophthalmology IRIS50 Measures. Ophthalmology 2020;127(6):836-838.
Shoshany TN, Michalak S, Staffa SJ, Chinn RN, Bishop K, Hunter DG. Effect of Primary Occlusion Therapy in Asymmetric, Bilateral Amblyopia. Am J Ophthalmol 2020;211:87-93.Abstract
PURPOSE: Many bilateral amblyopia patients have asymmetric visual acuity (VA). There is no standard treatment for these patients, and outcomes have not been well described. Our goal is to compare VA outcomes in this group based on timing of occlusion therapy. DESIGN: Retrospective interventional comparative case series. METHODS: Setting: Institutional practice. PatientPopulation: Patients diagnosed with amblyopia at Boston Children's Hospital between 2010 and 2014. InclusionCriteria: VA ≥ 0.3 logMAR bilaterally by objective optotype-based measures, interocular difference (IOD) ≥ 0.18 logMAR, age 2-12 years. ExclusionCriteria: Loss to follow-up, managed surgically, deprivation amblyopia. Patients had either primary or secondary occlusion (primary = initiated when VA ≥ 0.3 logMAR bilaterally; secondary = initiated to correct residual IOD once VA improved to ≤0.18 logMAR in the stronger eye). ObservationProcedure: Patient demographics, VA, IOD, and stereopsis were compared between groups. OutcomeMeasures: VA improvement at 12-18 months and at last visits. RESULTS: Of 2,200 patients reviewed, 167 (7.6%) had asymmetric, bilateral amblyopia; 98 met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were equally divided between primary (n = 50) and secondary (n = 48) occlusion groups. There were no differences in demographics, baseline VA, or IOD between groups (P ≥ .22), although the primary occlusion group had a higher proportion of strabismic amblyopia (P = .007). VA in both eyes, IOD, and stereopsis improved similarly between groups, even after stratifying by amblyopia subtype (P ≥ .48). The secondary occlusion group was more likely to achieve 20/30 bilaterally and IOD ≤ 1 line at 12-18 months (P ≤ .4), although this equalized by the last visit. CONCLUSION: In patients with asymmetric, bilateral amblyopia, VA improved by 4 lines in the weaker eye and 2 lines in the stronger eye, while IOD improved by 2 lines, irrespective of occlusion status. Primary occlusion thus provided no further benefit over spectacle correction alone.
Shoshany TN, Chinn RN, Staffa SJ, Bishop K, Michalak S, Hunter DG. Identifying Characteristics Predictive of Lost-to-follow-up (LTFU) Status in Amblyopia. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To identify demographic and disease-related characteristics predictive of LTFU status in amblyopia treatment and create a risk model for predicting LTFU status. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study METHODS: Setting: Single center, ophthalmology department at Boston Children's Hospital (BCH). PATIENTS: 2037 patients treated for amblyopia at BCH between 2010-2014. OBSERVATION PROCEDURE: LTFU was defined as patients who did not return after initial visit, excluding those who came for second opinion. Multiple variables were tested for association with LTFU status. OUTCOME MEASURE: Odds ratio of LTFU risk associated with each variable. Multivariate logistic regression was used to create a risk score for predicting LTFU status. RESULTS: A large proportion of patients (23%) were LTFU after first visit. Older age, non-white race, lack of insurance, previous glasses or atropine treatment, and longer requested follow-up intervals were independent predictors of LTFU status. A multivariable risk score was created to predict probability of LTFU (AUC 0.68). CONCLUSIONS: Our comprehensive amblyopia database allows us to predict which patients are more likely to be LTFU after baseline visit, and develop strategies to mitigate these effects. These findings may help with practice efficiency and improve patient outcomes in the future by transitioning these analyses to an electronic medical record that could be programmed to provide continually updated decision support for individual patients based on large datasets.
Simmons NL, Robb RM, Tybor DJ, Gilbert AL. Older age and larger cyst size in children with spontaneous rupture of periorbital dermoid cysts. J AAPOS 2019;Abstract
We analyzed clinical and histopathologic data of 97 pediatric patients who underwent excision of dermoid cysts. On review, 16.5% of the sample population demonstrated localized chronic inflammatory changes, including the presence of giant cells and epithelial disruption. These features were considered indicative of prior cyst rupture. Age at time of initial presentation was significantly older and cyst size was significantly larger in patients with histopathologic signs of previous rupture. Longer time to presentation and time to excision were associated with increased odds of spontaneous rupture.
Smith LEH, Hellström A, Stahl A, Fielder A, Chambers W, Moseley J, Toth C, Wallace D, Darlow BA, Aranda JV, Hallberg B, Davis JM, of of the Consortium RPWIN. Development of a Retinopathy of Prematurity Activity Scale and Clinical Outcome Measures for Use in Clinical Trials. JAMA Ophthalmol 2018;Abstract
Importance: To facilitate drug and device development for neonates, the International Neonatal Consortium brings together key stakeholders, including pharmaceutical companies, practitioners, regulators, funding agencies, scientists, and families, to address the need for objective, standardized clinical trial outcome measurements to fulfill regulatory requirements. Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disease that affects preterm neonates. The current International Classification of Retinopathy of Prematurity does not take into account all of the characteristics of ROP and does not adequately discriminate small changes in disease after treatment. These factors are critical for evaluating outcomes in clinical trials. Observations: There is need for an updated ROP acute disease activity and structure scale as well as end-stage structure and ophthalmologic outcome measures designed for use at different ages. The scale and measures, based on current diagnostic methods and treatments, could be used as a guideline for clinical intervention trials. The scale is intended to be validated against retrospective data and revised for use in future trials. An iterative revision process can be accomplished if new measures are added to clinical trials and evaluated at the end of each trial for prognostic value. The new measures would then be incorporated into a new version of the activity scale and the outcome measures revised. Conclusions and Relevance: An ROP activity scale and outcome measures to obtain the most robust and discriminatory data for clinical trials are needed. The scales should be dynamic and modified as knowledge and imaging modalities improve and then validated using data from well-documented clinical trials. This approach is relevant to improving clinical trial data quality.

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