Strabismus

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Guhan S, Peng S-L, Janbatian H, Saadeh S, Greenstein S, Al Bahrani F, Fadlallah A, Yeh T-C, Melki SA. Surgical adhesives in ophthalmology: history and current trends. Br J Ophthalmol 2018;Abstract
Tissue adhesives are gaining popularity in ophthalmology, as they could potentially reduce the complications associated with current surgical methods. An ideal tissue adhesive should have superior tensile strength, be non-toxic and anti-inflammatory, improve efficiency and be cost-effective. Both synthetic and biological glues are available. The primary synthetic glues include cyanoacrylate and the recently introduced polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives, while most biological glues are composed of fibrin. Cyanoacrylate has a high tensile strength, but rapidly polymerises upon contact with any fluid and has been associated with histotoxicity. Fibrin induces less toxic and inflammatory reactions, and its polymerisation time can be controlled. Tensile strength studies have shown that fibrin is not as strong as cyanoacrylate. While more research is needed, PEG variants currently appear to have the most promise. These glues are non-toxic, strong and time-effective. Through MEDLINE and internet searches, this paper presents a systematic review of the current applications of surgical adhesives to corneal, glaucoma, retinal, cataract and strabismus surgeries. Our review suggests that surgical adhesives have promise to reduce problems in current ophthalmic surgical procedures.
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Heidary G, MacKinnon S, Elliott A, Barry BJ, Engle EC, Hunter DG. Outcomes of strabismus surgery in genetically confirmed congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles. J AAPOS 2019;Abstract
PURPOSE: To detail surgical strategy and strabismus outcomes in a genetically defined cohort of patients with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM). METHODS: A total of 13 patients with genetically confirmed CFEOM (via genetic testing for mutations in KIF21A, PHOX2A, and TUBB3) were retrospectively identified after undergoing strabismus surgery at Boston Children's Hospital and surgical outcomes were compared. RESULTS: Age at first surgery ranged from 11 months to 63 years, with an average of 3 strabismus procedures per patient. Ten patients had CFEOM1, of whom 9 had the KIF21A R954W amino acid (AA) substitution and 1 had the M947T AA substitution. Of the 3 with CFEOM3, 2 had the TUBB3 E410K AA substitution, and 1 had a previously unreported E410V AA substitution. CFEOM1 patients all underwent at least 1 procedure to address chin-up posture. Chin-up posture improved from 24° ± 8° before surgery to 10.0° ± 8° postoperatively (P < 0.001). Three CFEOM1 patients developed exotropia after vertical muscle surgery alone; all had the R954W AA substitution. Postoperatively, 1 CFEOM1 patient developed a corneal ulcer. All CFEOM3 patients appeared to have underlying exposure keratopathy, successfully treated with prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem (PROSE) lens in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS: CFEOM is a complex strabismus disorder for which surgical management is difficult. Despite an aggressive surgical approach, multiple procedures may be necessary to achieve a desirable surgical effect. Knowledge of the underlying genetic diagnosis may help to inform surgical management.
Heidary G, Hunter DG. Outcomes of strabismus surgery in genetically confirmed congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles. J AAPOS 2020;
Heidary G, Aakalu VK, Binenbaum G, Chang MY, Morrison DG, VanderVeen DK, Lambert SR, Trivedi RH, Galvin JA, Pineles SL. Adjustable Sutures in the Treatment of Strabismus: A Report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2022;129(1):100-109.Abstract
PURPOSE: To review the scientific literature that evaluates the effectiveness of adjustable sutures in the management of strabismus for adult and pediatric patients. METHODS: Literature searches were performed in the PubMed database through April 2021 with no date limitations and were restricted to publications in English. The searches identified 551 relevant citations, of which 55 were reviewed in full text. Of these, 17 articles met the inclusion criteria and were assigned a level of evidence rating by the panel methodologist. The search included all randomized controlled studies regardless of study size and cohort studies of 100 or more patients comparing the adjustable versus nonadjustable suture technique, with a focus on motor alignment outcomes or reoperation rates. RESULTS: The literature search yielded no level I studies. Of the 17 articles that met the inclusion criteria, 11 were rated level II and 6 were rated level III. Among the 12 studies that focused on motor alignment outcomes, 4 small randomized clinical trials (RCTs) did not find a statistically significant difference between groups, although they were powered to detect only very large differences. Seven of 8 nonrandomized studies found a statistically significant difference in motor alignment success in favor of the adjustable suture technique, both overall and in certain subgroups of patients. Successful motor alignment was seen in both exotropia (in 3 studies that were not limited to children) and esotropia (in 1 study of adults and 2 of children). The majority of included studies that reported on reoperation rates found the rates to be lower in patients who underwent strabismus surgery with adjustable sutures, but this finding was not uniformly demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: Although there are no level I studies evaluating the effectiveness of adjustable sutures for strabismus surgery, the majority of nonrandomized studies that met the inclusion criteria for this assessment reported an advantage of the adjustable suture technique over the nonadjustable technique with respect to motor alignment outcomes. This finding was not uniformly demonstrated among all studies reviewed and warrants further investigation in the development and analysis of adjustable suture techniques.
Hennein L, Robbins SL. Thyroid-Associated Orbitopathy: Management and Treatment. J Binocul Vis Ocul Motil 2021;:1-15.Abstract
Thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO) is a leading cause of orbital and strabismus symptoms in adults. Over the last decade, new treatments have greatly changed available options to alleviate symptoms and improve outcomes. This article discusses the pathophysiology and natural disease course of TAO, including when to pursue urgent treatment and when to consider other diagnoses. This article highlights the interventions that may alter the disease course and offers a comprehensive review on evidence-based interventions for both supportive therapy and systemic agents. The surgical strategies and principles for the treatment of TAO are discussed, including indications for combined surgical interventions and varying surgical techniques.
Hunter DG. Evaluation of the Risk of Postoperative Infection in Adjustable Suture Strabismus Surgery. JAMA Ophthalmol 2016;134(10):1156-1157.
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Khan AO, Almutlaq M, Oystreck DT, Engle EC, Abu-Amero K, Bosley T. Retinal Dysfunction in Patients with Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type 2. Ophthalmic Genet 2016;37(2):130-6.Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 2 (CFEOM2) is a distinct non-syndromic form of congenital incomitant strabismus secondary to orbital dysinnervation from recessive mutations in the gene PHOX2A. The phenotype includes bilateral ptosis, very large angle exotropia, ophthalmoplegia, and poorly-reactive pupils. Other than amblyopia, afferent visual dysfunction has not been considered part of CFEOM2; however, we have repeatedly observed non-amblyopic subnormal vision in affected patients. The purpose of this study was to document this recurrent feature of the phenotype. METHODS: A retrospective case series (2002-2012). RESULTS: Eighteen patients (four families) were identified; all affected individuals had confirmed homozygous recessive PHOX2A mutations except one individual for whom genetic testing was not done because of multiple genetically confirmed family members. Age at assessment ranged from 5-62 years old (median 10 years old). All patients had decreased best-corrected visual acuity not completely explainable by amblyopia in both the preferred and non-preferred eye. In those patients who had further ancillary testing, visual fields (five patients) and electroretinography (10 patients) confirmed abnormalities not ascribable to amblyopia. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to a distinct form of congenital incomitant strabismus, the phenotype of CFEOM2 includes subnormal vision consistent with retinal dysfunction. This could be the direct result of PHOX2A mutations or a secondary effect of orbital dysinnervation.

Kruger JM, Mansouri B, Cestari DM. An update on the genetics of comitant strabismus. Semin Ophthalmol 2013;28(5-6):438-41.Abstract
Genetics play a significant role in the development of comitant strabismus and elucidating the relevant mechanisms that cause it may lead to the development of new therapeutic options. The genetics of strabismus are complex and involve the interactions of multiple genes. This article reviews the progress that has been made in the understanding of the genetic causes of comitant strabismus including linkage studies that have identified a variety of candidate sites, RNA and protein studies that have identified genes with altered regulation, and a study that establishes a role for genetic imprinting in comitant strabismus.
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Mehendale RA, Stemmer-Rachamimov AO, Dagi LR. A 50-year-old man with a long-standing, large-angle exotropia and limitation of adduction in the left eye. Digit J Ophthalmol 2013;19(4):64-7.
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Oke I, Elhusseiny AM, Shah AS, Hunter DG. Botulinum Toxin Injection of the Inferior Oblique Muscles for V-Pattern Strabismus and Primary Position Hypertropia. Am J Ophthalmol 2022;235:32-37.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate outcomes of botulinum toxin (BTX) injection of the inferior oblique (IO) muscle. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: Setting: Single center, ophthalmology department at Boston Children's Hospital. STUDY POPULATION: All patients treated with IO muscle injection of BTX (onabotulinumtoxinA) between 2010 and 2020. OBSERVATION PROCEDURE: Sensorimotor evaluations at short-term (<2 months), medium-term (2-4 months), and long-term (≥4 months) intervals. OUTCOME MEASURE: Primary outcomes included median improvement in V-pattern strabismus and primary position hypertropia. Secondary outcomes included IO muscle overaction. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed to identify differences before and after injection. RESULTS: Record review identified 20 patients with a median age of 4.5 (range, 1-69) years. Median BTX dose injected (31 IO muscles) was 5.0 (range, 3.0-7.0) units. Indications included V-pattern strabismus (N = 8), hypertropia (N = 7), or both (N = 5). Median long-term interval was 6.4 (range, 4.1-26.6) months. Injections were concurrent with treatment of horizontal strabismus in all but 3 cases. Median V-pattern magnitude changed from 10 prism diopters (PD) preoperatively to 0 PD short-term (P = .006) and 3.5 PD long-term (P = .34). Median hypertropia changed from 8.5 PD preoperatively to 1.5 PD short-term (P = .01) and 8 PD long-term (P = .87). Median IO muscle overaction grade improved significantly at short-term (P < .001) and long-term (P = .007) intervals. There were no complications associated with the IO muscle injections. CONCLUSIONS: BTX injection of the IO muscles can be a useful adjunct to the management of V-pattern strabismus. Intervention for primary position hypertropia may be helpful for short-term relief with no expectation of long-term benefit.
Oke I, Shah AS, Lorenz B, Basiakos S, Gokyigit B, Ugo Dodd M-M, Laurent E, Hunter DG, Goberville M, Elkamshoushy A, Tsai C-B, Orge F, Velez FG, Jeddawi L, Gravier N, Li N, Dagi LR, Dagi LR. Nasal Transposition of the Split Lateral Rectus Muscle for Strabismus Associated with Bilateral 3rd-Nerve Palsy. Am J Ophthalmol 2022;Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine success rate and complications associated with nasal transposition of the split lateral rectus muscle (NTSLR) for treating bilateral 3rd-nerve palsy. DESIGN: Retrospective, interventional case series METHODS: : Setting: International, multicenter registry Study population: All patients with bilateral 3rd-nerve palsy treated with NTSLR. OBSERVATION: Sensorimotor evaluations before and 6-months after unilateral or bilateral NTSLR. OUTCOME MEASURES: Post-operative horizontal alignment ≤ 15 prism diopters (PD), intraoperative technical difficulties, and vision-threatening complications. The association of patient demographics and surgical technique with each outcome was analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients were included with a median age of 46 years (Interquartile range [IQR], 25-54 years) at surgery. The most common etiologies were ischemic (29%), neoplastic (15%), and congenital (12%). NTSLR performed unilaterally with alternative surgery on the opposite eye (65%) resulted in a median post-operative exotropia of 18 PD (IQR, 7-35 PD), and when performed bilaterally (35%) resulted in post-operative exotropia of 14 PD (IQR, 5-35 PD). Success was achieved in 50% of cases, intra-operative technical difficulties reported in 18%, and vision-threatening complications occurred in 21%. Attachment of the lateral rectus muscle ≥ 10 mm posterior to the medial rectus insertion was associated with increased vision-threatening complications (OR, 9.0; 95% CI, 1.3-99). CONCLUSIONS: NTSLR can address the large-angle exotropia associated with bilateral 3rd-nerve palsy. Surgeons should be aware that posterior placement of the lateral rectus muscle can increase the risk of vision-threatening complications, particularly serous choroidal effusion.
Oke I, Hunter DG. Chorioretinal Scars From Scleral Perforation During Prior Strabismus Surgery. JAMA Ophthalmol 2022;140(4):e215711.
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Phanphruk W, Alkharashi M, Bilge A, Hunter DG. Sedated suture adjustment in children undergoing adjustable-suture strabismus surgery. J AAPOS 2017;Abstract
PURPOSE: To study methods and adverse events of postoperative, sedated suture adjustment after strabismus surgery in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). METHODS: We reviewed the postoperative experience of all children ≤18 years of age undergoing adjustable suture strabismus surgery at Boston Children's Hospital over a 3-year period. Time in the hospital, adverse events, and surgical outcomes were reviewed to evaluate safety and healthcare resource utilization. RESULTS: Of 356 patients, 113 required suture adjustment in the PACU, including 24 adjusted while awake and 89 adjusted under sedation. For sedation, sequential boluses of propofol were administered until adjustment was complete. Complete data from the sedated adjustment was available in 76 patients. The median initial bolus was 30 mg; the median total propofol rate was 273 mcg/kg/min. Twelve patients (16%) required only a single bolus of propofol. Of remaining 64 patients, median time from initial to final propofol dose was 7 minutes. Median anesthesiologist time in the PACU was 13 minutes. In the sedated adjustment group, there were no clinically significant adverse events, and the pain score never exceeded 6 (of a possible 10). Median duration of PACU stay was shortest in the group not requiring adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: Sedated suture adjustment allows for fine-tuning of postoperative binocular alignment in children and uncooperative adults. No adverse events were observed in our study group, but the procedure does increase the time patients spend in the hospital. This work will inform disclosure of risks and benefits of sedated adjustment while allowing for more accurate assessment of the cost and quality of adjustable sutures in children.
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Scelfo C, Elhusseiny AM, Alkharashi M. Effect of inferior oblique myectomy on primary position when combined with lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia. Eur J Ophthalmol 2022;32(1):559-562.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the surgical success and need for adjustment due to overcorrection in patients who undergo inferior oblique myectomy (IOM) combined with lateral rectus recession (LRc) for intermittent exotropia in the setting of inferior oblique overaction. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients with intermittent exotropia who underwent LRc using adjustable sutures alone versus LRc combined with IOM between January 2010 and July 2018 at our institution. Binocular alignment was recorded before and within one week of surgery. Evaluation measures noted were surgical success (defined as distance alignment of ⩽10 prism diopters) and need for postoperative adjustment due to overcorrection. RESULTS: Of 48 patients, 24 underwent LRc alone and 24 underwent LRc combined with IOM; all 48 patients had adjustable sutures. Surgical success was significantly higher in the LRc alone group (91.6%) compared with the LRc with IOM group (62.5%) (p = 0.036). The need for postoperative adjustment due to overcorrection was also significantly higher in the LRc with IOM group (20.8%) compared with the LRc alone group (0%) (p = 0.049). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, more patients needed adjustment for overcorrection after undergoing LRc combined with IOM versus LRc alone. Since the tertiary action of the inferior oblique is abduction it is possible that, in patients with inferior oblique overaction, surgically weakening the inferior oblique causes more esodeviation and overcorrection. Thus, surgical correction of exotropia and inferior oblique overaction using LRc combined with IOM may lead to overcorrection and increased need for postoperative adjustment.
Serafino M, Granet DB, Kushner BJ, Dagi LR, Kekunnaya R, Nucci P, Kreatsoulas C. Definition of successful outcomes after surgery for each type of strabismus: a Delphi study. J AAPOS 2021;Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Delphi process has been widely used to delineate guidelines for the treatment of disorders for which there is little or no evidence in the published literature. The purpose of this study was to use the Delphi process to identify areas of consensus and disagreement on the definition of success after surgery for each type of strabismus. METHODS: Two rounds of electronic questionnaires were sent to 28 members of the Strabismus Success Definition Delphi Study Group. For the first round, responses to 70 questions were captured as agree (= 1) and disagree (= 2). For round 2, a total of 89 questions were captured on a Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree). Consensus was determined a priori at 85%. RESULTS: In both the first and second rounds, inter-rater agreement of 85% consensus was reached for only 20% of questions. Intra-rater agreement per question was low, with κ values ranging from -0.11 to 0.62. Intra-rater agreement was also low among themes, ranging from poor to fair agreement: κ = 0.25 for motor, κ = 0.28 for sensory, and κ = 0.35 for follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights consensus areas that could be considered by researchers in designing studies and identifies areas where lack of consensus indicates that further research is needed.
Serafino M, Granet DB, Kushner BJ, Dagi LR, Kekunnaya R, Nucci P. Use of the Delphi process for defining successful outcomes for strabismus surgery. J AAPOS 2019;23(6):309-312.Abstract
The purpose of this review was to identify areas of consensus and disagreement among experts for the definition of success following strabismus surgery using the Delphi process. Three rounds of electronic questionnaires were sent to a panel of 28 strabismus experts. Throughout the process, members of the panel were masked to one another's identities to minimize the possibility of influence among members. Prior to data collection, we defined consensus as an 85% agreement on the answer to each question. Questions for which there was no consensus were reworded, and the resultant new questions were used in each subsequent round of questioning. We arrived at consensus for 23 of the 36 questions (64%). Consensus was obtained for recommending unique criteria for the definition of success for certain specific strabismus conditions. In addition, it was considered important that stereopsis and the range of single binocular vision be included in the definition of success for certain types of strabismus.
Shah AS, Ugo Dodd M-M, Gokyigit B, Lorenz B, Laurent E, Sadiq MAA, Tsai C-B, Gravier N, Goberville M, Basiakos S, Zurakowski D, Dagi LR, Dagi LR. Worldwide outcomes of nasal transposition of the split lateral rectus muscle for strabismus associated with 3rd-nerve palsy. Br J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: To determine success rate and complications associated with nasal transposition of the split lateral rectus muscle (NTSLR) for treating strabismus from 3rd-nerve palsy. METHODS: An international, multicentre, registry of patients with unilateral 3rd-nerve palsy treated with NTSLR was created. Patients with concurrent surgery on the contralateral eye were excluded. Primary outcome was horizontal alignment within 15 prism dioptres (PD) of orthotropia. Incidence of technical difficulties and vision-threatening complications by 6 months post-procedure were reported. RESULTS: Ninety-eight patients met inclusion criteria. Median age was 33.5 years (IQR 10.75-46). Aetiologies included congenital (31%), neoplastic (16%) and traumatic (15%). Twenty-five per cent of patients had prior ipsilateral strabismus surgery. Median exotropia decreased from 70PD preoperatively (IQR 50-90) to 1PD postoperatively (IQR 0-15.5), with a success rate of 69%. Performing concurrent superior oblique muscle tenotomy (SOT) was independently associated with success (p=0.001). Technical challenges occurred in 30% of cases, independently associated with a history of ipsilateral strabismus surgery (p=0.01). Eleven per cent of patients had vision-threatening complications, independently associated with more posterior placement of the split lateral rectus (LR) muscle (p<0.001), and most commonly transient serous choroidal effusion. Surgical placement of the split LR muscle within 4.25 mm of the medial rectus (MR) muscle insertion reduced this risk. CONCLUSION: NTSLR significantly improved primary position alignment altered by 3rd-nerve palsy. Concurrent SOT and placement of the split LR muscle ≤4.25 mm posterior to the MR muscle insertion optimised outcomes. NTSLR proved technically challenging when prior ipsilateral strabismus surgery had been performed.
Sharma M, Hunter DG. Diplopia after Strabismus Surgery. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;:1-6.Abstract
Diplopia is a disappointing and, at times, unanticipated consequence of what might otherwise be considered anatomically successful strabismus surgery. In this study, we review the existing literature regarding diplopia after strabismus surgery in the context of the senior author's experience. We divide postoperative diplopia types into cases that occur in the setting of normal binocular vision (or "normal" suppression) vs. cases that are the consequence of rare or anomalous sensorial adaptations. We then discuss how to identify patients at greatest risk based on history and preoperative testing, and we offer strategies for managing these sometimes-challenging cases.
Sharma M, MacKinnon S, Zurakowski D, Dagi LR. Consecutive superior oblique palsy after adjustable suture spacer surgery for Brown syndrome: incidence and predicting risk. J AAPOS 2018;Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the incidence of and to identify characteristics predicting significant superior oblique palsy (SOP) after adjustable superior oblique suture spacer surgery for treatment of Brown syndrome. METHODS: The medical records of patients treated for unilateral Brown syndrome with adjustable suture spacers (2005-2016) were reviewed to identify possible association of age at surgery, spacer length, surgeon performing procedure, severity of Brown syndrome, preoperative hypotropia in primary position and affected side gaze, and reduction in Brown restriction on postoperative superior oblique function. "Good" postoperative superior oblique function was defined as absence of hypertropia and diplopia in primary position and no more than intermittent diplopia in downgaze comfortably fused with ≤4Δ base-down or head tilt of <10°. Presence of postoperative hypertropia in primary position with increase in downgaze met criteria for significant SOP. Postoperative Brown restriction of ≤ -2 indicated resolution of Brown syndrome. RESULTS: Median age at surgery was 59 months, interquartile range (IQR) was 32-82 months, and median spacer length was 6 mm (range, 2-7 mm) for 19 included patients. Preoperative median hypotropia was 9Δ (IQR, 0Δ-12Δ) in primary position and 18Δ (IQR, 5Δ-22Δ) in affected side gaze. Of 19 patients, 16 (84%) achieved sufficient resolution of Brown syndrome, but 6 (32%) developed significant SOP. Modest preoperative hypotropia in affected side gaze was the only predictor of significant SOP (likelihood ratio test = 7.11; P = 0.008). Logistic regression modeling enabled estimation of risk of significant SOP based on preoperative side gaze hypotropia. CONCLUSIONS: Suture spacer surgery can result in significant SOP. Risk may be predicted by magnitude of preoperative side gaze hypotropia.
Somsen D, Heidary G. Rapid onset of orbital cellulitis after uncomplicated strabismus surgery. J AAPOS 2019;Abstract
Orbital cellulitis is extremely uncommon following strabismus surgery. When it occurs, the infection has been reported to present from day 1 to within 1 week following surgery and has the potential for significant morbidity postoperatively. We report the case of a 6-year-old boy presenting with unilateral orbital cellulitis growing group A Streptococcus pyogenes on postoperative day 1, after uncomplicated bilateral medial rectus recessions. The patient had two contacts with streptococcal pharyngitis at the time of surgery but was completely asymptomatic himself. We hypothesize that these contacts may have led to the rapid onset of his orbital cellulitis.

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