Publications

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Yonekawa Y, Andreoli C, Miller JB, Loewenstein JI, Sobrin L, Eliott D, Vavvas DG, Miller JW, Kim IK. Conversion to aflibercept for chronic refractory or recurrent neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Am J Ophthalmol 2013;156(1):29-35.e2.Abstract
PURPOSE: To explore the visual and anatomic outcomes of patients with refractory or recurrent neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) who were converted from bevacizumab and/or ranibizumab to aflibercept. DESIGN: Two-center, retrospective chart review. METHODS: Treatment history, visual acuity (VA), and central macular thickness (CMT) on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography were collected. Patients were divided into "refractory" (persistent exudation despite monthly injections) or "recurrent" (exudation suppressed, but requiring frequent injections). RESULTS: One hundred and two eyes of 94 patients were included; 68 were refractory and 34 were recurrent. Eyes received a mean of 20.4 prior bevacizumab/ranibizumab injections and a mean of 3.8 aflibercept injections. Mean follow-up was 18 weeks. Mean VA was 20/50-1 before conversion, 20/50-2 after 1 aflibercept injection (P = .723), and 20/50+2 after the final injection (P = .253). Subgroup analysis of refractory and recurrent cases also showed stable VA. Of the refractory cases, mean CMT had improved after 1 injection (P < .001) and the final injection (P < .001). Intraretinal (P < .001) and subretinal (P < .001) fluid decreased after 1 injection, and the mean injection interval was extended from 5.2 to 6.2 weeks (P = .003). Of the recurrent cases, mean CMT improved after 1 injection (P < .001) and the final injection (P < .001). Intraretinal (P = .003) and subretinal (P = .046) fluid decreased after 1 injection, and the mean injection interval was extended from 7.2 to 9.5 weeks (P = .001). CONCLUSIONS: Converting patients with chronic neovascular AMD to aflibercept results in stabilized vision and improved anatomic outcomes, while allowing injection intervals to be extended.
Yonekawa Y, Hacker HD, Lehman RE, Beal CJ, Veldman PB, Vyas NM, Shah AS, Wu D, Eliott D, Gardiner MF, Kuperwaser MC, Rosa RH, Ramsey JE, Miller JW, Mazzoli RA, Lawrence MG, Arroyo JG. Ocular blast injuries in mass-casualty incidents: the marathon bombing in Boston, Massachusetts, and the fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas. Ophthalmology 2014;121(9):1670-6.e1.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the ocular injuries sustained by survivors of the April 15, 2013, Boston Marathon bombing and the April 17, 2013, fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas. DESIGN: Multicenter, cross-sectional, retrospective, comparative case series. PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-two eyes of 36 patients treated at 12 institutions were included in the study. METHODS: Ocular and systemic trauma data were collected from medical records. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Types and severity of ocular and systemic trauma and associations with mechanisms of injury. RESULTS: In the Boston cohort, 164 of 264 casualties were transported to level 1 trauma centers, and 22 (13.4%) required ophthalmology consultations. In the West cohort, 218 of 263 total casualties were transported to participating centers, of which 14 (6.4%) required ophthalmology consultations. Boston had significantly shorter mean distances to treating facilities (1.6 miles vs. 53.6 miles; P = 0.004). Overall, rigid eye shields were more likely not to have been provided than to have been provided on the scene (P<0.001). Isolated upper body and facial wounds were more common in West largely because of shattered windows (75.0% vs. 13.6%; P = 0.001), resulting in more open-globe injuries (42.9% vs. 4.5%; P = 0.008). Patients in Boston sustained more lower extremity injuries because of the ground-level bomb. Overall, 27.8% of consultations were called from emergency rooms, whereas the rest occurred afterward. Challenges in logistics and communications were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Ocular injuries are common and potentially blinding in mass-casualty incidents. Systemic and ocular polytrauma is the rule in terrorism, whereas isolated ocular injuries are more common in other calamities. Key lessons learned included educating the public to stay away from windows during disasters, promoting use of rigid eye shields by first responders, the importance of reliable communications, deepening the ophthalmology call algorithm, the significance of visual incapacitation resulting from loss of spectacles, improving the rate of early detection of ocular injuries in emergency departments, and integrating ophthalmology services into trauma teams as well as maintaining a voice in hospital-wide and community-based disaster planning.
Yonekawa Y, Miller JB, Turalba AV, Eliott D. Traumatic macular hole from intentional basketball overinflation. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina 2013;44(3):303-5.Abstract
We report a new mechanism of ocular trauma. A basketball was intentionally overinflated until it exploded, resulting in corneal edema, hyphema, iritis, vitreous hemorrhage, commotio retinae, and a macular hole. The macular hole did not close after observation and subsequent pars plana vitrectomy with posterior hyaloid removal, but a repeat vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling resulted in hole closure. Basketball overinflation to the point of explosion is a potentially blinding practice of which the public and manufacturers should be made aware.
Yonekawa Y, VanderVeen DK, Shah AS. Congenital glaucoma. J Pediatr 2013;163(1):301.
Yonekawa Y, Wu W-C, Kusaka S, Robinson J, Tsujioka D, Kang KB, Shapiro MJ, Padhi TR, Jain L, Sears JE, Kuriyan AE, Berrocal AM, Quiram PA, Gerber AE, Paul Chan RV, Jonas KE, Wong SC, Patel CK, Abbey AM, Spencer R, Blair MP, Chang EY, Papakostas TD, Vavvas DG, Sisk RA, Ferrone PJ, Henderson RH, Olsen KR, Hartnett EM, Chau FY, Mukai S, Murray TG, Thomas BJ, Meza AP, Drenser KA, Trese MT, Capone A. Immediate Sequential Bilateral Pediatric Vitreoretinal Surgery: An International Multicenter Study. Ophthalmology 2016;123(8):1802-8.Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the feasibility and safety of bilateral simultaneous vitreoretinal surgery in pediatric patients. DESIGN: International, multicenter, interventional, retrospective case series. PARTICIPANTS: Patients 17 years of age or younger from 24 centers worldwide who underwent immediate sequential bilateral vitreoretinal surgery (ISBVS)-defined as vitrectomy, scleral buckle, or lensectomy using the vitreous cutter-performed in both eyes sequentially during the same anesthesia session. METHODS: Clinical history, surgical details and indications, time under anesthesia, and intraoperative and postoperative ophthalmic and systemic adverse events were reviewed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ocular and systemic adverse events. RESULTS: A total of 344 surgeries from 172 ISBVS procedures in 167 patients were included in the study. The mean age of the cohort was 1.3±2.6 years. Nonexclusive indications for ISBVS were rapidly progressive disease (74.6%), systemic morbidity placing the child at high anesthesia risk (76.0%), and residence remote from surgery location (30.2%). The most common diagnoses were retinopathy of prematurity (ROP; 72.7% [P < 0.01]; stage 3, 4.8%; stage 4A, 44.4%; stage 4B, 22.4%; stage 5, 26.4%), familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (7.0%), abusive head trauma (4.1%), persistent fetal vasculature (3.5%), congenital cataract (1.7%), posterior capsular opacification (1.7%), rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (1.7%), congenital X-linked retinoschisis (1.2%), Norrie disease (2.3%), and viral retinitis (1.2%). Mean surgical time was 143±59 minutes for both eyes. Higher ROP stage correlated with longer surgical time (P = 0.02). There were no reported intraoperative ocular complications. During the immediate postoperative period, 2 eyes from different patients demonstrated unilateral vitreous hemorrhage (0.6%). No cases of endophthalmitis, choroidal hemorrhage, or hypotony occurred. Mean total anesthesia time was 203±87 minutes. There were no cases of anesthesia-related death, malignant hyperthermia, anaphylaxis, or cardiac event. There was 1 case of reintubation (0.6%) and 1 case of prolonged oxygen desaturation (0.6%). Mean follow-up after surgery was 103 weeks, and anatomic success and globe salvage rates were 89.8% and 98.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study found ISBVS to be a feasible and safe treatment paradigm for pediatric patients with bilateral vitreoretinal pathologic features when repeated general anesthesia is undesirable or impractical.

Yonekawa Y, Shah AS, France RM, Ciarlini P, VanderVeen DK. Leukocoria in a 2-year-old boy. J Paediatr Child Health 2014;50(9):744.
Yonekawa Y, Shildkrot Y, Eliott D. Inferior peripheral nonperfusion in bilateral diffuse uveal melanocytic proliferation. Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina 2013;44(2):190-2.Abstract
Bilateral diffuse uveal melanocytic proliferation (BDUMP) is a paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by cataract, photoreceptor loss and subretinal fluid overlying patchy areas of retinal pigment epithelium atrophy, and a diffusely thickened choroid with focal nodules. We present the case of a 64-year-old woman with a history of endometrial adenocarcinoma who developed BDUMP with bilateral exudative retinal detachments with inferior peripheral retinal ischemia. This new finding of peripheral nonperfusion expands the spectrum of BDUMP.
Yonekawa Y, Kim IK, Gragoudas ES, Njauw C-NJ, Tsao H, Jakobiec FA, Stacy RC. Aggressive skull base metastasis from uveal melanoma: a clinicopathologic study. Eur J Ophthalmol 2014;24(5):811-3.Abstract
PURPOSE: We present the clinical, pathologic, and genetic findings of the first reported case of choroidal melanoma that developed a late recurrence and aggressive metastasis to the skull base without evidence of hepatic involvement. METHODS: Retrospective chart review and clinicopathologic correlation of ocular and brain tissue, including sequencing of BAP1 for mutations. RESULTS: A 55-year-old woman was diagnosed with choroidal melanoma and treated with proton radiotherapy. Six years later, she developed a rapidly growing local recurrence involving the ciliary body and iris. Upon enucleation, histopathology revealed an iris and ciliary body epithelioid melanoma that was contiguous with the previously treated, regressed spindle cell choroidal melanoma. Imaging was initially negative for brain involvement. Two months later, she developed cranial neuropathies and was found to have a large skull base lesion that required surgical debulking for pain palliation. Histopathology confirmed the lesion to be metastatic melanoma. Both ocular and brain tumor specimens were wild-type for BAP1. Throughout her course, she developed no hepatic metastases. CONCLUSIONS: Uveal melanoma may metastasize to the skull base. The present case was characterized by delayed onset and unusual aggressiveness of the metastatic disease, and lack of BAP1 mutation. The unusual course highlights a unique phenotype that may reflect an alternate molecular mechanism for metastatic disease.
Yonekawa Y, Kim IK. Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema. Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2012;23(1):26-32.Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME) is a common cause of visual impairment after cataract surgery. This article systematically reviews and discusses the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of PCME, with a focus on advances in the past 1-2 years. RECENT FINDINGS: The incidence of PCME has declined with the advent of modern surgical techniques. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important adjunct to biomicroscopy and fluorescein angiography. PCME prophylaxis with topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs remains unproven because long-term visual outcomes and comparative effectiveness studies are lacking. Chronic, refractory CME remains a therapeutic challenge, but investigational therapies with potential include corticosteroid intravitreal injections and implants, and intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatments. Few studies have assessed surgical options. SUMMARY: There is currently a lack of well designed randomized clinical trials to guide the treatment of PCME.
Yong JJ, Hatch KM. Corneal Cross-Linking: An Effective Treatment Option for Pellucid Marginal Degeneration. Semin Ophthalmol 2019;:1-6.Abstract
: This is the first review article examining literature specific to the use of corneal cross-linking (CXL) to treat pellucid marginal degeneration (PMD). : CXL appears to be an effective treatment that may halt the progression of PMD to stabilize vision. This could postpone or eliminate the need for corneal transplantation in the management of these patients. Furthermore, combining CXL with keratorefractive surgery in a single procedure has been shown to be safe and successful in improving vision in PMD patients. : The data reported in literature is limited at this time, consisting mostly of retrospective studies with short term follow up. Further research is needed to evaluate refractive effects of combined CXL and excimer laser procedures.
Yoon MK, Habib LA. Spheno-Orbital Dermoid Masquerading as Recurrent Orbital Abscess. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2021;37(6):e213-e215.Abstract
A 10-month-old girl presented with eyelid edema and erythema that did not improve with systemic antibiotics. Due to a lack of improvement, MRI was performed to avoid ionizing radiation from CT. An orbital abscess was recognized and drained. However, the abscess recurred 2 times. CT scan was performed and a tract in the sphenoid bone helped to diagnose a congenital dural sinus tract with dermoid. Definitive surgery was performed with neurosurgery to remove the entire tract including cutaneous connection. CT scan proved critical to diagnosis and should be considered in infants in select cases despite the concern for ionizing radiation in this vulnerable age group.
Yoon MK, McCulley TJ. Secondary tarsoconjunctival graft: a modification to the Cutler-Beard procedure. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2013;29(3):227-30.Abstract
PURPOSE: The Cutler-Beard procedure is a commonly used technique to reconstruct large upper eyelid defects. Eyelid retraction and entropion are common complications. To prevent these problems, the authors modified the traditional Cutler-Beard procedure with secondary placement of an autologous tarsoconjunctival graft. METHODS: This is a retrospective review of 2 patients with large upper eyelid defects necessitating upper eyelid reconstruction. The initial stage is unaltered. At the time of flap division, a tarsoconjunctival graft from the contralateral upper eyelid is sutured to the posterior surface of the newly constructed upper eyelid. Two patients underwent this procedure, and follow up was 4 and 23 months, respectively. Patients developed no postoperative complications, including entropion or retraction. CONCLUSIONS: This modification to the Cutler-Beard operation is a technically simple procedure that can restore a more anatomically correct eyelid and can prevent subsequent entropion or retraction. This technique is unique, offering 3 major advances: first, placing the graft at the second surgical stage; second, replacing the tarsus and conjunctiva with like tissue; and third, preserving a lip of conjunctiva to cover the edge of the newly reconstructed upper eyelid.
Yoon MK, Piluek WJ, Ruggiero JP, McDermott MW, McCulley TJ. Orbital cerebrospinal fluid accumulation after complicated pterional-orbitozygomatic craniotomy. J Neuroophthalmol 2014;34(4):346-9.Abstract

We describe 2 patients who developed postoperative orbital cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection after orbitozygomatic pterional craniotomy. An 18-year-old woman underwent exploratory pterional-orbitozygomatic craniotomy. Five days postoperatively, after removal of a lumbar drain, proptosis and a compressive optic neuropathy developed. Computed tomography demonstrated a CSF collection contiguous with the craniotomy site. Resolution followed percutaneous aspiration and replacement of the lumbar drain. A 57-year-old woman underwent a pterional-orbitozygomatic craniotomy for removal of a left anterior clinoid meningioma, complicated by a large left hemorrhagic stroke requiring decompressive hemicraniectomy. Extracranial CSF collections accumulated in both the orbit and subgaleal spaces. Resolution followed placement of an external ventricular drain. Based on these cases, the mechanism seems to be the combination of iatrogenic formation of a communication with the subarachnoid space and elevated intracranial pressure. Resolution was achieved by normalizing intracranial pressure.

Yoon MK, McCulley TJ. Autologous dermal grafts as posterior lamellar spacers in the management of lower eyelid retraction. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2014;30(1):64-8.Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the safety and efficacy of autologous postauricular dermal grafts as posterior lamellar spacing material in patients with lower eyelid retraction. METHODS: At a tertiary care institution, 10 eyelids of 10 patients (7 men, 3 women; mean 56 years, range 24-78) who underwent repair of lower eyelid retraction using a postauricular dermal graft between July 2008 and December 2010 were retrospectively assessed. Data collected included patient demographics, etiology of retraction, and surgical history. Outcome measures included preoperative and postoperative eyelid position and surgery-related complications. RESULTS: Postoperative results were favorable: mean preoperative inferior scleral show was 3.3 ± 2.6 mm compared with 0.3 ± 1.2 mm postoperatively, p = 0.004 (paired t test). Mean follow up was 39.2 weeks (range 12-94). Complications included keratinization of the graft with vellus hair growth (n = 1) and ectropion (n = 1), both corrected with minor surgical interventions. One patient achieved overcorrection but declined further treatment. No donor site complications were encountered. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest postauricular dermal grafts are effective posterior lamellar spacers in the correction of eyelid retraction. They have adequate rigidity whilst maintaining sufficient pliability to mold to the globe. Resorption, common to acellular dermis matrix allografts and xenografts, was not encountered. Donor site complications were not encountered. Complications shared with other material include overcorrection and ectropion. Complications unique to autologous dermis include keratinization and hair growth.
Yoon MK, Parsa AT, Horton JC. Skull thickening, paranasal sinus expansion, and sella turcica shrinkage from chronic intracranial hypotension. J Neurosurg Pediatr 2013;11(6):667-72.Abstract
In children or young adults, the morphology of the skull can be altered by excessive drainage of CSF following placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. In Sunken Eyes, Sagging Brain Syndrome, gradual enlargement of the orbital cavity occurs from low or negative intracranial pressure (ICP), leading to progressive bilateral enophthalmos. The authors report several heretofore unrecognized manifestations of this syndrome, which developed in a 29-year-old man with a history of VP shunt placement following a traumatic brain injury at the age of 9 years. Magnetic resonance imaging showed typical features of chronic intracranial hypotension, and lumbar puncture yielded an unrecordable subarachnoid opening pressure. The calvaria was twice its normal thickness, owing to contraction of the inner table. The paranasal sinuses were expanded, with aeration of the anterior clinoid processes, greater sphenoid wings, and temporal bones. The sella turcica showed a 50% reduction in cross-sectional area as compared with that in control subjects, resulting in partial extrusion of the pituitary gland. These new features broaden the spectrum of clinical findings associated with low ICP. Secondary installation of a valve to restore normal ICP is recommended to halt progression of these rare complications of VP shunt placement.
Yoon MK, Rizzo JF. Giant Cell Arteritis in Black Patients: Do We Know How Rare It Is?. JAMA Ophthalmol 2019;
Yoon MK, Kelly HR, Freitag SK, Marneros AG, Barshak MB, Brackett DG. Case 12-2021: A 78-Year-Old Man with a Rash on the Scalp and Face. N Engl J Med 2021;384(16):1553-1562.
Yoon MK, Jakobiec FA, Mendoza PR. Canaliculops: clinicopathologic features and treatment with marsupialization. Am J Ophthalmol 2013;156(5):1062-1068.e1.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the features of the rare and under-recognized condition of canaliculops (or canaliculocele) of the eyelid, which is a dilation of the canaliculus, and to evaluate treatment with marsupialization. DESIGN: Retrospective interventional case series. METHODS: The records of 2 patients with canaliculops from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary were reviewed. Data collected included clinical history, surgical technique, histopathologic analysis, and comparative immunohistochemical analysis of a range of cytokeratins in normal conjunctival epithelium, normal canalicular epithelium, and canaliculops epithelium. RESULTS: Two women, 53 and 66 years of age, experienced chronic, noninflammatory, painless medial eyelid and eyelid margin fluctuant swelling after earlier trauma or eyelid surgery. The external mass was accompanied by a whitish opalescent or bluish discoloration of a palpebral surface bulge. Biopsy revealed multilaminar (up to 12 cells thick), nonkeratinizing, tightly packed small squamous epithelial cells that surmounted a highly regimented basal layer with a picket fence arrangement. No goblet cells or subepithelial inflammation were present. Immunohistochemistry revealed only superficial CK7 immunostaining and positive patchy suprabasilar CK17 staining in the canaliculops epithelium, contrasting with their full-thickness positivity and negativity, respectively, in normal conjunctival epithelium. Marsupialization achieved resolution of the condition in each patient. CONCLUSIONS: An improved awareness of the normal canalicular epithelial structure and its immunohistochemical features can definitively separate canaliculops from conjunctival cysts. Previous treatment of canaliculops has involved complete excisions. Canaliculops may, however, be effectively treated with less invasive marsupialization while obtaining an adequate biopsy specimen for histopathologic diagnosis.
You C, Ma L, Lasave AF, Foster SC. Rituximab Induction and Maintenance Treatment in Patients with Scleritis and Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Wegener's). Ocul Immunol Inflamm 2017;:1-8.Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of rituximab (RTX) induction and maintenance treatment for patients with scleritis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), Wegener's. METHODS: Nine patients (12 eyes) with scleritis with GPA who did not respond to corticosteroids and more than one immunosuppressive agent who received ongoing maintenance RTX treatment were identified. Demographics and outcome measures were recorded. RESULTS: Median follow-up time of 30 months (range, 15 to 87 months). All 12 eyes achieved remission during the RTX maintenance period with a median time in remission of 14 months (range, 5-76 months), and median interval between RTX initiation and inactive disease of 5 months (range, 2-8 months). Two eyes in two patients relapsed. One received steroid eye drops, and the other received a short-term increased dose of intravenous corticosteroids. CONCLUSIONS: RTX was effective as an induction and maintenance treatment in our small cohort of patients with GPA-associated scleritis.
You C, Lamba N, Lasave AF, Ma L, Diaz MH, Foster SC. Rituximab in the treatment of ocular cicatricial pemphigoid: a retrospective cohort study. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2017;255(6):1221-1228.Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of rituximab (RTX) for the treatment of patients with aggressive ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP). METHODS: A review of patient records at a tertiary referral center with biopsy confirmed OCP who presented between 2006 and 2016. Sixty-one eyes of 32 patients with symptomatic OCP who received treatment with RTX monotherapy or RTX in combination with additional immunomodulatory treatment (IMT) were evaluated. Main outcomes included clinically evident remission of disease, the percentage of corticosteroid sparing patients, stage of OCP (Foster), best corrected visual acuity, and treatment complications. Remission was defined as absence of progressive scarring and active ocular inflammation for ≥ 2 months. Partial remission/responding was defined as disease control and clinical improvement for ≥ 2 months. RESULTS: Mean age at the initiation of RTX treatment was 59.1 years (range, 24-80 years) with a median follow-up time after RTX initiation of 32 months (range, 14 to 127 months). Twenty-six patients achieved clinical remission with an average sustained remission of 24.5 months (from 9 months to 84 months). RTX monotherapy was used in six patients, RTX in combination with intravenous immunoglobulin in 14 patients, and RTX with intravenous immunoglobulin and/or with other IMT agent in six patients. Seven eyes (11.5%) of six patients had favorable response to RTX and achieved response and partial remission, while inflammation remained active in the other seven eyes (11.5%) of four patients though there was no progressive scarring. At the last visit, three patients (9.4%) were on topical corticosteroid, three patients (9.4%) were treated with systemic corticosteroid treatments, and the other 26 patients (81.2%) achieved corticosteroid sparing therapy. Five eyes (8.2%) progressed one Foster stage. No other cicatrization progression or worsening of LogMAR visual acuity (p = 0.641) was observed during the follow-up period. Adverse events included leukopenia in three patients (9.4%), anemia in two patients (6.2%), liver enzyme elevation in three patients (9.4%) who were also on another concomitant IMT drug, and Epstein-Barr Virus infection and sinus infection in one patient each (3.1%). No other severe adverse events were noted during the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: These retrospective data suggest that RTX is efficacious and well tolerated when included for the treatment of OCP. Controlled studies are necessary to identify the role of this IMT agent in the therapeutic arsenal, especially its optimum dose and duration of administration.

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