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Nascimento H, Viana-Niero C, Nogueira CL, Martins Bispo PJ, Pinto F, de Paula Pereira Uzam C, Matsumoto CK, Oliveira Machado AM, Leão SC, Höfling-Lima AL, de Freitas D. Identification of the Infection Source of an Outbreak of Mycobacterium Chelonae Keratitis After Laser in Situ Keratomileusis. Cornea 2018;37(1):116-122.Abstract
PURPOSE: Nontuberculous mycobacteria keratitis is a rare but challenging complication of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). This study was conducted to determine the source(s) of infection in a cluster of cases of keratitis after LASIK and to describe this outbreak and patients' outcomes. METHODS: In this retrospective, case series, single-center study, 86 patients were included who underwent LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy between December 2011 and February 2012. Corneal scrapes from the affected eyes, samples of tap and distilled water, water from the reservoir of the distilling equipment, steamer, and autoclave cassette; antiseptic and anesthetic solutions and surgical instrument imprints were cultivated in liquid and on solid media. Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts were identified using automated systems and mycobacteria by polymerase chain reaction-restriction enzyme analysis of the hsp65 gene (PRA-hsp65) and DNA sequencing. Mycobacterial isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The cases and outcomes are described. The main outcome measure was identification of the source(s) of the mycobacterial infections. RESULTS: Eight (15 eyes) of 86 patients (172 eyes) who underwent LASIK developed infections postoperatively; no patients who underwent photorefractive keratectomy developed infections. Mycobacterium chelonae was isolated from 4 eyes. The distilled water collected in the surgical facility contained the same M. chelonae strain isolated from the patients' eyes. Different gram-negative bacteria and yeasts were isolated from samples collected at the clinic but not from the patients' eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Tap water distilled locally in surgical facilities may be a source of infection after ocular surgery and its use should be avoided.
Rodriguez JD, Lane KJ, Ousler GW, Angjeli E, Smith LM, Abelson MB. Blink: Characteristics, Controls, and Relation to Dry Eyes. Curr Eye Res 2018;43(1):52-66.Abstract
Blink is a complex phenomenon that is profoundly affected by diverse endogenous and exogenous stimuli. It has been studied in the context of cognition, emotional, and psychological states, as an indicator of fatigue and sleepiness, particularly in the automobile and transportation industry, in visual tasking, and finally, as it relates to tear film stability and ocular surface health. The fact that it is highly variable and has input from so many sources makes it very difficult to study. In the present review, the behavior of blink in many of these systems is discussed, ultimately returning in each instance to a discussion of how these factors affect blink in the context of dry eyes. Blink is important to ocular surface health and to an individual's optimal functioning and quality of life. Disturbances in blink, as cause or effect, result in a breakdown of tear film stability, optical clarity, and visual function.
Marsh AP, Edwards TJ, Galea C, Cooper HM, Engle EC, Jamuar SS, Méneret A, Moutard M-L, Nava C, Rastetter A, Robinson G, Rouleau G, Roze E, Spencer-Smith M, Trouillard O, de Villemeur TB, Walsh CA, Yu TW, Yu TW, Heron D, Sherr EH, Richards LJ, Depienne C, Leventer RJ, Lockhart PJ. DCC mutation update: Congenital mirror movements, isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum, and developmental split brain syndrome. Hum Mutat 2018;39(1):23-39.Abstract
The deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) gene encodes the netrin-1 (NTN1) receptor DCC, a transmembrane protein required for the guidance of commissural axons. Germline DCC mutations disrupt the development of predominantly commissural tracts in the central nervous system (CNS) and cause a spectrum of neurological disorders. Monoallelic, missense, and predicted loss-of-function DCC mutations cause congenital mirror movements, isolated agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC), or both. Biallelic, predicted loss-of-function DCC mutations cause developmental split brain syndrome (DSBS). Although the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to disease remain poorly understood, they are thought to stem from reduced or perturbed NTN1 signaling. Here, we review the 26 reported DCC mutations associated with abnormal CNS development in humans, including 14 missense and 12 predicted loss-of-function mutations, and discuss their associated clinical characteristics and diagnostic features. We provide an update on the observed genotype-phenotype relationships of congenital mirror movements, isolated ACC and DSBS, and correlate this to our current understanding of the biological function of DCC in the development of the CNS. All mutations and their associated phenotypes were deposited into a locus-specific LOVD (https://databases.lovd.nl/shared/genes/DCC).
Roberto SA, Bayes J, Karner PE, Morley MG, Nanji KC. Patient Harm in Cataract Surgery: A Series of Adverse Events in Massachusetts. Anesth Analg 2018;126(5):1548-1550.Abstract
Massachusetts state agencies received reports of 37 adverse events (AEs) involving cataract surgery from 2011 to 2015. Fifteen were anesthesia related, including 5 wrong eye blocks, 3 cases of hemodynamic instability, 2 retrobulbar hematoma/hemorrhages, and 5 globe perforations resulting in permanent loss of vision. While Massachusetts' reported AEs likely underrepresent the true number of AEs that occur during cataract surgery, they do offer useful signal data to indicate the types of patient harm occurring during these procedures.
Inomata T, Hua J, Nakao T, Shiang T, Chiang H, Amouzegar A, Dana R. Corneal Tissue From Dry Eye Donors Leads to Enhanced Graft Rejection. Cornea 2018;37(1):95-101.Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess the effect of dry eye disease (DED) in graft donors on dendritic cell (DC) maturation, host T-cell sensitization, and corneal allograft rejection. METHODS: Corneas of control (healthy donor) and DED mice (C57BL/6) were transplanted onto fully allogeneic naive BALB/c recipients (n = 10 mice/group). Long-term allograft survival was evaluated for 8 weeks. Corneas and draining lymph nodes (dLNs) were harvested at posttransplantation day 14 (n = 5 mice/group). The frequencies of MHCII CD11c DCs in the donor corneas and host dLNs and the frequencies of interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-17 CD4 T cells and Foxp3 expression by Tregs in host dLNs were investigated using flow cytometry. The enzyme-linked immunospot assay was used to assess host T-cell allosensitization through direct and indirect pathways (n = 3/group). RESULTS: Recipients of DED donor corneas showed significantly reduced graft survival (10%) compared with control mice (50% survival, P = 0.022), and had significantly increased frequencies of mature DCs in the grafted cornea (DED donor 44.0% ± 0.36% vs. healthy donor 35.4 ± 0.5%; P < 0.0001) and host dLNs (DED donor 25.1% ± 0.66% vs. healthy donor 13.7% ± 1.6%; P = 0.005). Frequencies of IFN-γ and IL-17 T cells were increased in the dLNs of recipients of DED corneas, whereas the expression (mean fluorescence intensity) of Foxp3 in Tregs was decreased significantly in these mice (DED donor 6004 ± 193 vs. healthy donor 6806 ± 81; P = 0.0002). Enzyme-linked immunospot analysis showed that the direct pathway of allosensitization was significantly amplified in recipients of grafts with DED (P = 0.0146). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that DED in the donor is a significant risk factor for subsequent corneal allograft rejection.
Nanji KC, Roberto SA, Morley MG, Bayes J. Preventing Adverse Events in Cataract Surgery: Recommendations From a Massachusetts Expert Panel. Anesth Analg 2018;126(5):1537-1547.Abstract
Massachusetts health care facilities reported a series of cataract surgery-related adverse events (AEs) to the state in recent years, including 5 globe perforations during eye blocks performed by 1 anesthesiologist in a single day. The Betsy Lehman Center for Patient Safety, a nonregulatory Massachusetts state agency, responded by convening an expert panel of frontline providers, patient safety experts, and patients to recommend strategies for mitigating patient harm during cataract surgery. The purpose of this article is to identify contributing factors to the cataract surgery AEs reported in Massachusetts and present the panel's recommended strategies to prevent them. Data from state-mandated serious reportable event reports were supplemented by online surveys of Massachusetts cataract surgery providers and semistructured interviews with key stakeholders and frontline staff. The panel identified 2 principal categories of contributing factors to the state's cataract surgery-related AEs: systems failures and choice of anesthesia technique. Systems failures included inadequate safety protocols (48.7% of contributing factors), communication challenges (18.4%), insufficient provider training (17.1%), and lack of standardization (15.8%). Choice of anesthesia technique involved the increased relative risk of needle-based eye blocks. The panel's surveys of Massachusetts cataract surgery providers show wide variation in anesthesia practices. While 45.5% of surgeons and 69.6% of facilities reported increased use of topical anesthesia compared to 10 years earlier, needle-based blocks were still used in 47.0% of cataract surgeries performed by surgeon respondents and 40.9% of those performed at respondent facilities. Using a modified Delphi approach, the panel recommended several strategies to prevent AEs during cataract surgery, including performing a distinct time-out with at least 2 care-team members before block administration; implementing standardized, facility-wide safety protocols, including a uniform site-marking policy; strengthening the credentialing and orientation of new, contracted and locum tenens anesthesia staff; ensuring adequate and documented training in block administration for any provider who is new to a facility, including at least 10 supervised blocks before practicing independently; using the least invasive form of anesthesia appropriate to the patient; and finally, adjusting anesthesia practices, including preferred techniques, as evidence-based best practices evolve. Future research should focus on evaluating the impact of these recommendations on patient outcomes.
Mueller SK, Miyake MM, Lefebvre DR, Freitag SK, Bleier BS. Long-term impact of endoscopic orbital decompression on sinonasal-specific quality of life. Laryngoscope 2018;128(4):785-788.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Endoscopic orbital decompression (EOD) is the workhorse surgical intervention for severe thyroid eye disease in Graves disease. Although EOD is a safe and effective procedure, the objective of this study is to determine the impact of orbital decompression on long-term sinonasal-pecific quality of life. METHODS: Retrospective study of 27 patients who underwent EOD by a single surgeon. The primary endpoint was change in preoperative 22-item Sinonasal Outcomes Test (SNOT-22) score at a minimum of 1 year. The secondary endpoint was to determine whether the performance of septoplasty for surgical access in patients without nasal obstruction impacted domain 1 (i.e., rhinologic domain) and total SNOT-22 scores. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 25.7 ± 11.4 months. Domain 1 scores significantly increased at the first postoperative visit (P ≤ 0.01) and returned to baseline values between 1 and 3 months. At 1 year, significant improvements in both total score and domain 4 and 5 (psychological and sleep dysfunction, respectively) scores were seen (P < 0.01 for all scores). Septoplasty was not associated with a significant change in SNOT-22 score at 1 year (P = 0.48). CONCLUSION: Endoscopic orbital decompression is associated at 1 year with a significant improvement in sinonasal-specific quality of life, which is driven by the psychological and sleep dysfunction domains. Adjunctive septoplasty has no significant impact on SNOT-22 scores. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4. Laryngoscope, 128:785-788, 2018.
Lundgren P, Hård A-L, Wilde Å, Löfqvist C, Smith LEH, Hellström A. Implementing higher oxygen saturation targets reduced the impact of poor weight gain as a predictor for retinopathy of prematurity. Acta Paediatr 2018;107(5):767-773.Abstract
AIM: This study evaluated poor weight gain as a risk factor for infants who required treatment for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), by comparing those born before and after the implementation of higher oxygen saturation (SpO ) targets at the Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. METHODS: We compared infants born at less than 31 weeks, who were screened and, or, treated for ROP: 127 in 2011-2012 when SpO targets were 88-92% and 142 in 2015-2016 when they were 91-95%. The subjects were reviewed for birth characteristics, weekly weight and ROP treatment. Data were analysed using the weight, insulin-like growth factor 1, neonatal, ROP (WINROP) prediction tool. RESULTS: The 2011-2012 infants who needed ROP treatment (12.6%) had significantly poorer postnatal weight gain than those who did not, but this was not seen in the treated (17.6%) and nontreated ROP groups in 2015-2016. WINROP sensitivity decreased from 87.5% in 2011-12 to 48% in 2015-2016. CONCLUSION: After the SpO target range was increased from 88-92% to 91-95%, postnatal weight gain was no longer a significant risk factor and WINROP lost its ability to predict ROP requiring treatment. Risk factors clearly change as neonatal care develops.
Cohen LM, Elliott A, Freitag SK. Acquired Intermittent Pediatric Horner Syndrome due to Neuroblastoma. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2018;34(2):e38-e41.Abstract
A 3-month-old male developed intermittent left upper eyelid ptosis at the age of 1 month that was gradually increasing in frequency and duration. Examination revealed anisocoria and left upper and lower eyelid ptosis, consistent with a left Horner syndrome. Imaging showed a mass in the left superior posterior mediastinum, which was resected, and pathology was consistent with neuroblastoma. Eight months thereafter, the patient underwent left upper eyelid ptosis repair. Cases of infantile acquired Horner syndrome due to neuroblastoma are rare. To the authors' knowledge, there has only been one case described that presented with intermittent symptoms. The authors report the second case of intermittent acquired Horner syndrome due to neuroblastoma. This case demonstrates the importance of recognizing that Horner syndrome may present with subtle and intermittent symptoms. In a pediatric patient, one should maintain suspicion for neuroblastoma.
Cavalcanti BM, Cruzat A, Sahin A, Pavan-Langston D, Samayoa E, Hamrah P. In vivo confocal microscopy detects bilateral changes of corneal immune cells and nerves in unilateral herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Ocul Surf 2018;16(1):101-111.Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze bilateral corneal immune cell and nerve alterations in patients with unilateral herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) by laser in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and their correlation with corneal sensation and clinical findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective, cross-sectional, controlled, single-center study. Twenty-four eyes of 24 HZO patients and their contralateral clinically unaffected eyes and normal controls (n = 24) were included. Laser IVCM (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph/Rostock Cornea Module), corneal esthesiometry (Cochet-Bonnet) were performed. Changes in corneal dendritiform cell (DC) density and morphology, number and length of subbasal nerve fibers and their correlation to corneal sensation, pain, lesion location, disease duration, and number of episodes were analyzed. RESULTS: HZO-affected and contralateral eyes showed a significant increase in DC influx of the central cornea as compared to controls (147.4 ± 33.9, 120.1 ± 21.2, and 23.0 ± 3.6 cells/mm2; p < 0.0001). In HZO eyes DCs were larger in area (319.4 ± 59.8 μm2; p < 0.001) and number of dendrites (3.5 ± 0.4 n/cell; p = 0.01) as compared to controls (52.2 ± 11.7, and 2.3 ± 0.5). DC density and size showed moderate negative correlation with total nerve length (R = -0.43 and R = -0.57, respectively; all p < 0.001). A higher frequency of nerve beading and activated DCs close to nerve fibers were detected specifically in pain patients. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic unilateral HZO causes significant bilateral increase in corneal DC density and decrease of the corneal subbasal nerves as compared to controls. Negative correlation was observed for DC density and size to nerve parameters, suggesting interplay between the immune and nervous systems. Patients with chronic pain also showed increased nerve beading and activated DCs.
Isik L, Singer J, Madsen JR, Kanwisher N, Kreiman G. What is changing when: Decoding visual information in movies from human intracranial recordings. Neuroimage 2018;180(Pt A):147-159.Abstract
The majority of visual recognition studies have focused on the neural responses to repeated presentations of static stimuli with abrupt and well-defined onset and offset times. In contrast, natural vision involves unique renderings of visual inputs that are continuously changing without explicitly defined temporal transitions. Here we considered commercial movies as a coarse proxy to natural vision. We recorded intracranial field potential signals from 1,284 electrodes implanted in 15 patients with epilepsy while the subjects passively viewed commercial movies. We could rapidly detect large changes in the visual inputs within approximately 100 ms of their occurrence, using exclusively field potential signals from ventral visual cortical areas including the inferior temporal gyrus and inferior occipital gyrus. Furthermore, we could decode the content of those visual changes even in a single movie presentation, generalizing across the wide range of transformations present in a movie. These results present a methodological framework for studying cognition during dynamic and natural vision.
Pemberton JD, Salter M, Fay A, Thuro B, Spencer H, Dajani O. Investigation of goldmann perimetry in evaluation of patients for upper eyelid blepharoplasty. Orbit 2018;37(1):48-52.Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine if preoperative Goldmann Visual Field (GVF) testing in patients with functional dermatochalasis accurately depicts the postoperative superior visual field (SVF) outcome. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was done to compare preoperative and postoperative GVF field tests in patients undergoing upper eyelid blepharoplasty for treatment of dermatochalasis. This study was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and approved by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences institutional review board. A preoperative GVF was obtained with the eyelids in the natural position (untaped) and then again with excess skin elevated (taped). One month post-blepharoplasty, another GVF was conducted with eyelids untaped. The pre- and post GVF tests were analyzed to determine if preoperative testing accurately predicts the SVF improvement post-blepharoplasty. RESULTS: Forty-six eyelids (23 patients) who underwent blepharoplasty for dermatochalasis were included. The preoperative testing underestimated 76% (35/46) of cases by a mean of 61%; and overestimated the final outcome in 24% (11/46) of cases by mean of 23%. Overall, the preoperative GVF testing underestimated the postoperative outcome by a mean of 35%. CONCLUSION: Improvement of the SVF after a blepharoplasty is typically greater than the preoperative GVF testing predicts.

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