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Cakir B, Liegl R, Hellgren G, Lundgren P, Sun Y, Klevebro S, Löfqvist C, Mannheimer C, Cho S, Poblete A, Duran R, Hallberg B, Canas J, Lorenz V, Liu Z-J, Sola-Visner MC, Smith LEH, Hellström A. Thrombocytopenia is associated with severe retinopathy of prematurity. JCI Insight 2018;3(19)Abstract
Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is characterized by abnormal retinal neovascularization in response to vessel loss. Platelets regulate angiogenesis and may influence ROP progression. In preterm infants, we assessed ROP and correlated with longitudinal postnatal platelet counts (n = 202). Any episode of thrombocytopenia (<100 × 109/l) at ≥30 weeks postmenstrual age (at onset of ROP) was independently associated with severe ROP, requiring treatment. Infants with severe ROP also had a lower weekly median platelet count compared with infants with less severe ROP. In a mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy model of ROP, platelet counts were lower at P17 (peak neovascularization) versus controls. Platelet transfusions at P15 and P16 suppressed neovascularization, and platelet depletion increased neovascularization. Platelet transfusion decreased retinal of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) mRNA and protein expression; platelet depletion increased retinal VEGFA mRNA and protein expression. Resting platelets with intact granules reduced neovascularization, while thrombin-activated degranulated platelets did not. These data suggest that platelet releasate has a local antiangiogenic effect on endothelial cells to exert a downstream suppression of VEGFA in neural retina. Low platelet counts during the neovascularization phase in ROP is significantly associated with the development of severe ROP in preterm infants. In a murine model of retinopathy, platelet transfusion during the period of neovascularization suppressed retinopathy.
Verticchio Vercellin AC, Jassim F, Poon LY-C, Tsikata E, Braaf B, Shah S, Ben-David G, Shieh E, Lee R, Simavli H, Que CJ, Papadogeorgou G, Guo R, Vakoc BJ, Bouma BE, de Boer JF, Chen TC. Diagnostic Capability of Three-Dimensional Macular Parameters for Glaucoma Using Optical Coherence Tomography Volume Scans. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2018;59(12):4998-5010.Abstract
Purpose: To compare the diagnostic capability of three-dimensional (3D) macular parameters against traditional two-dimensional (2D) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. To determine if manual correction and interpolation of B-scans improve the ability of 3D macular parameters to diagnose glaucoma. Methods: A total of 101 open angle glaucoma patients (29 with early glaucoma) and 57 healthy subjects had peripapillary 2D RNFL thickness and 3D macular volume scans. Four parameters were calculated for six different-sized annuli: total macular thickness (M-thickness), total macular volume (M-volume), ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness, and GCC volume of the innermost 3 macular layers (retinal nerve fiber layer + ganglion cell layer + inner plexiform layer). All macular parameters were calculated with and without correction and interpolation of frames with artifacts. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) were calculated for all the parameters. Results: The 3D macular parameter with the best diagnostic performance was GCC-volume-34, with an inner diameter of 3 mm and an outer of 4 mm. The AUROC for RNFL thickness and GCC-volume-34 were statistically similar for all regions (global: RNFL thickness 0.956, GCC-volume-34 0.939, P value = 0.3827), except for the temporal GCC-volume-34, which was significantly better than temporal RNFL thickness (P value = 0.0067). Correction of artifacts did not significantly change the AUROC of macular parameters (P values between 0.8452 and 1.0000). Conclusions: The diagnostic performance of best macular parameters (GCC-volume-34 and GCC-thickness-34) were similar to or better than 2D RNFL thickness. Manual correction of artifacts with data interpolation is unnecessary in the clinical setting.
Pan H, Yan Y, Zhang J, Zhao S, Feng L, Ou J, Cao N, Li M, Zhao W, Wan C, Ismail AM, Rajaiya J, Chodosh J, Zhang Q. Rapid Construction of a Replication-Competent Infectious Clone of Human Adenovirus Type 14 by Gibson Assembly. Viruses 2018;10(10)Abstract
In 1955, Human adenovirus type 14 (HAdV-B14p) was firstly identified in a military trainee diagnosed as acute respiratory disease (ARD) in the Netherlands. Fifty years later, a genomic variant, HAdV-B14p1, re-emerged in the U.S. and caused large and fatal ARD outbreaks. Subsequently, more and more ARD outbreaks occurred in Canada, the UK, Ireland, and China, in both military and civil settings. To generate a tool for the efficient characterization of this new genomic variant, a full-length infectious genomic clone of HAdV-B14 was successfully constructed using one-step Gibson Assembly method in this study. Firstly, the full genome of HAdV-B14p1 strain GZ01, the first HAdV-B14 isolate in China, was assembled into pBR322 plasmid by Gibson Assembly. The pBRAdV14 plasmid, generated by Gibson Assembly, was analyzed and verified by PCR, restriction enzymes digestion and the sequencing. Secondly, viruses were rescued from pBRAdV14-transfected A549 cells. The integrity of the rescued viruses was identified by restriction enzyme analysis. The complete sequence of the infectious clone was further sequenced. No mutation was found in the infectious clone during the construction when compared with the parental virus and pBR322 sequences. The direct immunofluorescence assay indicated the expression of the hexon protein. Finally, typical virions were observed; the one-step growth curves further showed that the DNA replication and viral reproduction efficiency of pBRAd14 derived viruses was similar with that of wild-type HAdV-B14 strain. The successful construction of the replication-competent infectious clone of pBRAdV14 facilitates the development of vaccine and antiviral drugs against HAdV-B14, as well as provides a novel strategy for rapid construction of infectious viral clones for other large-genome DNA viruses.
Bonnemaijer PWM, Iglesias AI, Nadkarni GN, Sanyiwa AJ, Hassan HG, Cook C, Cook C, Simcoe M, Taylor KD, Schurmann C, Belbin GM, Kenny EE, Bottinger EP, van de Laar S, Wiliams SEI, Akafo SK, Ashaye AO, Zangwill LM, Girkin CA, Ng MCY, Rotter JI, Weinreb RN, Li Z, Allingham RR, of Consortium EAG, Nag A, Hysi PG, Meester-Smoor MA, Wiggs JL, Wiggs JL, Hauser MA, Hammond CJ, Lemij HG, Loos RJF, van Duijn CM, Thiadens AAHJ, Klaver CCW. Genome-wide association study of primary open-angle glaucoma in continental and admixed African populations. Hum Genet 2018;137(10):847-862.Abstract
Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a complex disease with a major genetic contribution. Its prevalence varies greatly among ethnic groups, and is up to five times more frequent in black African populations compared to Europeans. So far, worldwide efforts to elucidate the genetic complexity of POAG in African populations has been limited. We conducted a genome-wide association study in 1113 POAG cases and 1826 controls from Tanzanian, South African and African American study samples. Apart from confirming evidence of association at TXNRD2 (rs16984299; OR 1.20; P = 0.003), we found that a genetic risk score combining the effects of the 15 previously reported POAG loci was significantly associated with POAG in our samples (OR 1.56; 95% CI 1.26-1.93; P = 4.79 × 10). By genome-wide association testing we identified a novel candidate locus, rs141186647, harboring EXOC4 (OR 0.48; P = 3.75 × 10), a gene transcribing a component of the exocyst complex involved in vesicle transport. The low frequency and high degree of genetic heterogeneity at this region hampered validation of this finding in predominantly West-African replication sets. Our results suggest that established genetic risk factors play a role in African POAG, however, they do not explain the higher disease load. The high heterogeneity within Africans remains a challenge to identify the genetic commonalities for POAG in this ethnicity, and demands studies of extremely large size.
AbuSamra DB, Argüeso P. Lectin-Glycan Interactions in Corneal Infection and Inflammation. Front Immunol 2018;9:2338.Abstract
The cornea is an extraordinary component of vision that functions as the principal barrier to pathogens in the eye while allowing light transmission into the retina. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that maintain homeostasis in this tissue is the subject of intense scientific study given the high prevalence of corneal disease. Over the past decade, the interactions between lectins and glycans on plasma membranes have emerged as important regulatory factors in corneal biology. In particular, members of the galectin family have been shown to bind multiple β-galactoside-containing receptors to regulate immunopathological processes associated with viral and bacterial infection, transplantation, wound healing, dry eye, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. In this review, we describe the current understanding of how these surface interactions intersect with different pathways to activate unique cellular responses in cornea as well as their potential therapeutic implications.
Whitman MC, Nguyen EH, Bell JL, Tenney AP, Gelber A, Engle EC. Loss of CXCR4/CXCL12 Signaling Causes Oculomotor Nerve Misrouting and Development of Motor Trigeminal to Oculomotor Synkinesis. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2018;59(12):5201-5209.Abstract
Purpose: Proper control of eye movements is critical to vision, but relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate development and axon guidance in the ocular motor system or cause the abnormal innervation patterns (oculomotor synkinesis) seen in developmental disorders and after oculomotor nerve palsy. We developed an ex vivo slice assay that allows for live imaging and molecular manipulation of the growing oculomotor nerve, which we used to identify axon guidance cues that affect the oculomotor nerve. Methods: Ex vivo slices were generated from E10.5 IslMN-GFP embryos and grown for 24 to 72 hours. To assess for CXCR4 function, the specific inhibitor AMD3100 was added to the culture media. Cxcr4cko/cko:Isl-Cre:ISLMN-GFP and Cxcl12KO/KO:ISLMN-GFP embryos were cleared and imaged on a confocal microscope. Results: When AMD3100 was added to the slice cultures, oculomotor axons grew dorsally (away from the eye) rather than ventrally (toward the eye). Axons that had already exited the midbrain continued toward the eye. Loss of Cxcr4 or Cxcl12 in vivo caused misrouting of the oculomotor nerve dorsally and motor axons from the trigeminal motor nerve, which normally innervate the muscles of mastication, aberrantly innervated extraocular muscles in the orbit. This represents the first mouse model of trigeminal-oculomotor synkinesis. Conclusions: CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling is critical for the initial pathfinding decisions of oculomotor axons and their proper exit from the midbrain. Failure of the oculomotor nerve to innervate its extraocular muscle targets leads to aberrant innervation by other motor neurons, indicating that muscles lacking innervation may secrete cues that attract motor axons.
Kobashi H, Rong SS, Ciolino JB. Transepithelial versus epithelium-off corneal crosslinking for corneal ectasia. J Cataract Refract Surg 2018;44(12):1507-1516.Abstract
This review compared the clinical results of transepithelial corneal crosslinking (CXL) to epithelium-off (epi-off) CXL in progressive corneal ectasia using a metaanalysis. The Cochrane databases and Medline were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Seven RCTs involving 505 eyes that met the eligibility criteria were identified. The epi-off CXL group showed significantly better outcomes in postoperative changes in maximum keratometry (K) during 1-year observation periods. Transepithelial CXL resulted in significantly greater post-treatment central corneal thickness and best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA). The presence of a postoperative demarcation line was significantly more frequent after epi-off CXL than that after transepithelial CXL. No statistically significant difference was found between other parameters. Although patients in the transepithelial CXL group demonstrated a greater improvement in BSCVA compared with patients in the epi-off CXL group at the 1 year follow-up, transepithelial CXL had less impact on halting progressive corneal ectasia in terms of maximum K than epi-off CXL.
Ding M, Ellervik C, Huang T, Jensen MK, Curhan GC, Pasquale LR, Kang JH, Wiggs JL, Hunter DJ, Willett WC, Rimm EB, Kraft P, Chasman DI, Qi L, Hu FB, Qi Q. Diet quality and genetic association with body mass index: results from 3 observational studies. Am J Clin Nutr 2018;108(6):1291-1300.Abstract
Background: It is unknown whether dietary quality modifies genetic association with body mass index (BMI). Objective: This study examined whether dietary quality modifies genetic association with BMI. Design: We calculated 3 diet quality scores including the Alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010 (AHEI-2010), the Alternative Mediterranean Diet score (AMED), and the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score. We examined the interactions of a genetic risk score (GRS) based on 97 BMI-associated variants with the 3 diet quality scores on BMI in 30,904 participants from 3 large cohorts. Results: We found significant interactions between total GRS and all 3 diet scores on BMI assessed after 2-3 y, with an attenuated genetic effect observed in individuals with healthier diets (AHEI: P-interaction = 0.003; AMED: P = 0.001; DASH: P = 0.004). For example, the difference in BMI (kg/m2) per 10-unit increment of the GRS was smaller among participants in the highest tertile of AHEI score compared with those in the lowest tertile (0.84; 95% CI: 0.72, 0.96 compared with 1.14; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.29). Results were consistent across the 3 cohorts with no significant heterogeneity. The interactions with diet scores on BMI appeared more significant for central nervous system GRSs (P < 0.01 for 3 diet scores) than for non-central nervous system GRSs (P > 0.05 for 3 diet scores). Conclusions: A higher diet quality attenuated genetic predisposition to obesity. These findings underscore the importance of maintaining a healthful diet for the prevention of obesity, particularly for those individuals with a strong genetic predisposition to obesity. This trial was registered with the Clinical Trial Registry as NCT03577639.
Buskin A, Zhu L, Chichagova V, Basu B, Mozaffari-Jovin S, Dolan D, Droop A, Collin J, Bronstein R, Mehrotra S, Farkas M, Hilgen G, White K, Pan K-T, Treumann A, Hallam D, Bialas K, Chung G, Mellough C, Ding Y, Krasnogor N, Przyborski S, Zwolinski S, Al-Aama J, Alharthi S, Xu Y, Wheway G, Szymanska K, McKibbin M, Inglehearn CF, Elliott DJ, Lindsay S, Ali RR, Steel DH, Armstrong L, Sernagor E, Urlaub H, Pierce E, Lührmann R, Grellscheid S-N, Johnson CA, Lako M. Disrupted alternative splicing for genes implicated in splicing and ciliogenesis causes PRPF31 retinitis pigmentosa. Nat Commun 2018;9(1):4234.Abstract
Mutations in pre-mRNA processing factors (PRPFs) cause autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but it is unclear why mutations in ubiquitously expressed genes cause non-syndromic retinal disease. Here, we generate transcriptome profiles from RP11 (PRPF31-mutated) patient-derived retinal organoids and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), as well as Prpf31 mouse tissues, which revealed that disrupted alternative splicing occurred for specific splicing programmes. Mis-splicing of genes encoding pre-mRNA splicing proteins was limited to patient-specific retinal cells and Prpf31 mouse retinae and RPE. Mis-splicing of genes implicated in ciliogenesis and cellular adhesion was associated with severe RPE defects that include disrupted apical - basal polarity, reduced trans-epithelial resistance and phagocytic capacity, and decreased cilia length and incidence. Disrupted cilia morphology also occurred in patient-derived photoreceptors, associated with progressive degeneration and cellular stress. In situ gene editing of a pathogenic mutation rescued protein expression and key cellular phenotypes in RPE and photoreceptors, providing proof of concept for future therapeutic strategies.
Ba-Abbad R, Leys M, Wang X, Chakarova C, Waseem N, Carss KJ, Raymond LF, Bujakowska KM, Pierce EA, Mahroo OA, Mohamed MD, Holder GE, Hummel M, Arno G, Webster AR. Clinical Features of a Retinopathy Associated With a Dominant Allele of the RGR Gene. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2018;59(12):4812-4820.Abstract
Purpose: We describe the clinical features in two pedigrees with dominantly inherited retinopathy segregating the previously reported frameshifting mutation, c.836dupG (p.Ile280Asn*78) in the terminal exon of the RGR gene, and compare their haplotypes to that of the previously reported pedigree. Methods: The probands were ascertained at West Virginia University Eye Institute (WVU) and Moorfields Eye Hospital (MEH) through next generation sequencing (NGS) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) respectively. Clinical data included visual acuity (VA), visual fields, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and electroretinography (ERG). Haplotype analysis was performed using Sanger sequencing of the DNA from the molecularly ascertained individuals from the three pedigrees. Results: Nine heterozygous mutation carriers were identified in two families. Four carriers were asymptomatic; five carriers had variable VA reduction, visual field constriction, and experienced difficulty under dim illumination. Fundus examination of the asymptomatic carriers showed diffuse or reticular pigmentation of the retina; the symptomatic carriers had chorioretinal atrophy. FAF imaging showed widespread signal loss in advanced retinopathy, and reticular hyperautofluorescence in mild cases. OCT showed loss of outer retinal lamina in advanced disease. ERG showed moderate-to-severe rod-cone dysfunction in two symptomatic carriers; and was normal in three asymptomatic carriers. A shared haplotype flanking the mutation of up to 6.67 Mb was identified in both families. Within this region, 1.27 Mb were shared with the first family reported with this retinopathy. Conclusions: The clinical data suggest a variable and slow degeneration of the RPE. A shared chromosomal segment surrounding the RGR gene suggests a single ancestral mutational event underlying all three families.
Yu XT, Rong SS, Sun X, Ding G, Wan W, Zou L, Wu S, Li M, Wang D. Associations of breast milk adiponectin, leptin, insulin and ghrelin with maternal characteristics and early infant growth: a longitudinal study. Br J Nutr 2018;120(12):1380-1387.Abstract
Breast milk (BM) hormones have been hypothesised as a nutritional link between maternal and infant metabolic health. This study aimed to evaluate hormone concentrations in BM of women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and the relationship between maternal factors, BM hormones and infant growth. We studied ninety-six nulliparous women with (n 48) and without GDM and their exclusively breastfed term singletons. Women with GDM received dietary therapy or insulin injection for euglycaemia during pregnancy. Hormone concentrations in BM, maternal BMI and infant growth were longitudinally evaluated on postnatal days 3, 42 and 90. Mothers with GDM had decreased concentrations of adiponectin (P colostrum<0·001; P mature-milk=0·009) and ghrelin (P colostrum=0·011; P mature-milk<0·001) and increased concentration of insulin in BM (P colostrum=0·047; P mature-milk=0·021). Maternal BMI was positively associated with adiponectin (β=0·06; 95 % CI 0·02, 0·1; P=0·001), leptin (β=0·16; 95 % CI 0·12, 0·2; P<0·001) and insulin concentrations (β=0·06; 95 % CI 0·02, 0·1; P<0·001), and inversely associated with ghrelin concentration in BM (β=-0·08; 95 % CI -0·1, -0·06; P<0·001). Among the four hormones, adiponectin was inversely associated with infant growth in both the GDM (β weight-for-height=-2·49; 95 % CI -3·83, -1·15; P<0·001; β head-circumference=-0·39; 95 % CI -0·65, -0·13; P=0·003) and healthy groups (β weight-for-height=-1·42; 95 % CI -2·38, -0·46; P=0·003; β head-circumference=-0·15; 95 % CI -0·27, -0·03; P=0·007). Maternal BMI and GDM are important determinants of BM hormone concentrations. Milk-borne adiponectin is determined by maternal metabolic status and plays an independent down-regulating role in early infant growth.
Wittmann J, Dieckow J, Schröder H, Hampel U, Garreis F, Jacobi C, Milczarek A, Hsieh KL, Pulli B, Chen JW, Hoogeboom S, Bräuer L, Paulsen FP, Schob S, Schicht M. Plasma gelsolin promotes re-epithelialization. Sci Rep 2018;8(1):13140.Abstract
Woundhealing disorders characterized by impaired or delayed re-epithelialization are a serious medical problem that is painful and difficult to treat. Gelsolin (GSN), a known actin modulator, supports epithelial cell regeneration and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the potential of recombinant gelsolin (rhu-pGSN) for ocular surface regeneration to establish a novel therapy for delayed or complicated wound healing. We analyzed the influence of gelsolin on cell proliferation and wound healing in vitro, in vivo/ex vivo and by gene knockdown. Gelsolin is expressed in all tested tissues of the ocular system as shown by molecular analysis. The concentration of GSN is significantly increased in tear fluid samples of patients with dry eye disease. rhu-pGSN induces cell proliferation and faster wound healing in vitro as well as in vivo/ex vivo. TGF-β dependent transcription of SMA is significantly decreased after GSN gene knockdown. Gelsolin is an inherent protein of the ocular system and is secreted into the tear fluid. Our results show a positive effect on corneal cell proliferation and wound healing. Furthermore, GSN regulates the synthesis of SMA in myofibroblasts, which establishes GSN as a key protein of TGF-β dependent cell differentiation.
Meng W, Shah KP, Pollack S, Toppila I, Hebert HL, McCarthy MI, Groop L, Ahlqvist E, Lyssenko V, Agardh E, Daniell M, Kaidonis G, Craig JE, Mitchell P, Liew G, Kifley A, Wang JJ, Christiansen MW, Jensen RA, Penman A, Hancock HA, Chen CJ, Correa A, Kuo JZ, Li X, Chen Y, Rotter JI, Klein R, Klein B, Wong TY, Morris AD, Doney ASF, Colhoun HM, Price AL, Burdon KP, Groop PH, Sandholm N, Grassi MA, Sobrin L, Palmer CNA, markers for and hard endpoints for Innovative WTCCC (WTCCC2); SM-M-vascular2. A genome-wide association study suggests new evidence for an association of the NADPH Oxidase 4 (NOX4) gene with severe diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes. Acta Ophthalmol 2018;Sept 4Abstract

PURPOSE:

Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye complication in patients with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic factors contributing to severe diabetic retinopathy.

METHODS:

A genome-wide association approach was applied. In the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside Scotland (GoDARTS) datasets, cases of severe diabetic retinopathy were defined as type 2 diabetic patients who were ever graded as having severe background retinopathy (Level R3) or proliferative retinopathy (Level R4) in at least one eye according to the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Grading Scheme or who were once treated by laser photocoagulation. Controls were diabetic individuals whose longitudinal retinopathy screening records were either normal (Level R0) or only with mild background retinopathy (Level R1) in both eyes. Significant Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) were taken forward for meta-analysis using multiple Caucasian cohorts.

RESULTS:

Five hundred and sixty cases of type 2 diabetes with severe diabetic retinopathy and 4,106 controls were identified in the GoDARTS cohort. We revealed that rs3913535 in the NADPH Oxidase 4 (NOX4) gene reached a p value of 4.05 × 10-9 . Two nearby SNPs, rs10765219 and rs11018670 also showed promising p values (p values = 7.41 × 10-8 and 1.23 × 10-8 , respectively). In the meta-analysis using multiple Caucasian cohorts (excluding GoDARTS), rs10765219 and rs11018670 showed associations for diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.003 and 0.007, respectively), while the p value of rs3913535 was not significant (p = 0.429).

CONCLUSION:

This genome-wide association study of severe diabetic retinopathy suggests new evidence for the involvement of the NOX4 gene.

Raimundo M, Mira F, da Cachulo ML, Barreto P, Ribeiro L, Farinha C, Laíns I, Nunes S, Alves D, Figueira J, Merle BM, Delcourt C, Santos L, Silva R. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet, lifestyle and age-related macular degeneration: the Coimbra Eye Study - report 3. Acta Ophthalmol 2018;96(8):e926-e932.Abstract
PURPOSE: To characterize the lifestyle and nutritional risk profile associated with the Mediterranean diet in a Portuguese population with and without age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: Nested case-control study (n = 883) within the Coimbra Eye Study, including 434 subjects with AMD and 449 age- and sex-matched subjects without AMD. All enrolled subjects underwent a full risk assessment, including lifestyle-related risk factors and a thorough food frequency questionnaire. This allowed us to build an adherence score to the Mediterranean diet (mediSCORE, range 0-9) constructed from individual food intakes. Food intake was also further analysed by conversion to micronutrient consumption. RESULTS: Our results suggest that physical activity has a protective role in AMD [p = 0.018 after multivariate adjustment, OR: 0.69 (0.51-0.93)]. High (mediSCORE ≥6) was also found to be protective [p = 0.041, OR: 0.62 (95% CI: 0.38-0.97)]. Food group analysis unveiled a specific protective role for increased fruits consumption (p = 0.029). Finally, micronutrient analysis revealed a protective role associated with increased consumption of caffeine, fibres, beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: High mediSCORE appears to confer protection against the development of AMD in a Mediterranean population. This effect is driven by increased consumption of fruits and some antioxidant micronutrients, which emerged as statistically significant protective factors. Further studies are required to establish dietary recommendations with clinical application.

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