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Thon OR, Gittinger JW. Medication-Related Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):134-143.Abstract

Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome refers to elevated intracranial pressure associated with papilledema without an identified etiology for intracranial hypertension. Over the past few decades, several medications have been described to be associated with this syndrome. We searched the literature for those case reports and series and evaluated the evidence for the association of such medications with pseudotumor cerebri syndrome.

Chee YE, Eliott D. The Role of Vitrectomy in the Management of Fungal Endophthalmitis. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):29-35.Abstract

Fungal endophthalmitis is an important cause of vision loss worldwide with a large body of literature describing the treatment of the disease. The evidence supporting the use of pars plana vitrectomy in the management of fungal endophthalmitis is largely comprised of case reports and case series and demonstrates the important role of vitrectomy surgery. Vitrectomy can improve the likelihood of establishing the diagnosis, enhance the treatment of infection by removing fungal elements in the vitreous, aid in the removal of other inoculated intraocular structures, and is an important tool in the management of vision-threatening post-infectious sequelae like retinal detachment and epiretinal membrane.

Shaikh M, Miller JB, Papakostas TD, Husain D. The Efficacy and Safety Profile of Ocriplasmin in Vitreomacular Interface Disorders. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):52-55.Abstract

Vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) describes the adhesion of the posterior hyaloid face to the inner retina in any part of the macula. This can arise after incomplete separation of the posterior vitreous cortex from the macula during vitreous liquefaction. While the VMA may resolve spontaneously, a strong and persistent adhesion can lead to a variety of anatomical changes, including vitreomacular traction (VMT) and macular hole (MH). Both conditions can present with metamorphopsia and decreased vision. In cases of symptomatic VMT and full-thickness macular hole, pars plana vitrectomy has long been the standard of care. However, due to the possible surgical complications and need for postoperative care, many have searched for non-surgical options via pharmacologic vitreolysis. Ocriplasmin (Jetrea, Thrombogenics USA, Alcon/Novartis EU) is a recombinant protease approved in October 2012 for the treatment of symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion (VMA). There have been conflicting views on the safety of Ocriplasmin with changes in the ellipsoid zone seen on OCT and changes seen on ERG indicating photoreceptor damage. This publication reviews the efficacy and safety of ocriplasmin injection for VMA based on previously published data.

Pasquale LR, Aschard H, Kang JH, Bailey JCN, Lindström S, Chasman DI, Christen WG, Allingham RR, Ashley-Koch A, Lee RK, Moroi SE, Brilliant MH, Wollstein G, Schuman JS, Fingert J, Budenz DL, Realini T, Gaasterland T, Gaasterland D, Scott WK, Singh K, Sit AJ, Igo RP, Song YE, Hark L, Ritch R, Rhee DJ, Gulati V, Havens S, Vollrath D, Zack DJ, Medeiros F, Weinreb RN, Pericak-Vance MA, Liu Y, Kraft P, Richards JE, Rosner BA, Hauser MA, Haines JL, Wiggs JL. Age at natural menopause genetic risk score in relation to age at natural menopause and primary open-angle glaucoma in a US-based sample. Menopause 2017;24(2):150-156.Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Several attributes of female reproductive history, including age at natural menopause (ANM), have been related to primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). We assembled 18 previously reported common genetic variants that predict ANM to determine their association with ANM or POAG. METHODS: Using data from the Nurses' Health Study (7,143 women), we validated the ANM weighted genetic risk score in relation to self-reported ANM. Subsequently, to assess the relation with POAG, we used data from 2,160 female POAG cases and 29,110 controls in the National Eye Institute Glaucoma Human Genetics Collaboration Heritable Overall Operational Database (NEIGHBORHOOD), which consists of 8 datasets with imputed genotypes to 5.6+ million markers. Associations with POAG were assessed in each dataset, and site-specific results were meta-analyzed using the inverse weighted variance method. RESULTS: The genetic risk score was associated with self-reported ANM (P = 2.2 × 10) and predicted 4.8% of the variance in ANM. The ANM genetic risk score was not associated with POAG (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.002; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.998, 1.007; P = 0.28). No single genetic variant in the panel achieved nominal association with POAG (P ≥0.20). Compared to the middle 80 percent, there was also no association with the lowest 10 percentile or highest 90 percentile of genetic risk score with POAG (OR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.47, 1.21; P = 0.23 and OR = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.72, 1.69; P = 0.65, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: A genetic risk score predicting 4.8% of ANM variation was not related to POAG; thus, genetic determinants of ANM are unlikely to explain the previously reported association between the two phenotypes.

Huckfeldt RM, Comander J. Management of Cystoid Macular Edema in Retinitis Pigmentosa. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):43-51.Abstract

Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with an estimated prevalence of one in 4,000 that is classically characterized by the progressive constriction of peripheral vision and a later deterioration of visual acuity. Central vision can be compromised earlier in disease, however, in the approximately 25% of patients that have cystoid macular edema. This poorly understood problem can thus significantly impair patient quality of life, particularly as available treatments have limited efficacy. We will review clinical features of retinitis pigmentosa-associated cystoid macular edema, potential causative mechanisms, and finally, evidence supporting currently employed therapies with emphasis upon which management strategies require further evidence-based evaluation.

Rami HE, Barham R, Sun JK, Silva PS. Evidence-Based Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):67-74.Abstract

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most frequent microvascular complication from diabetes and requires annual screening and at least annual follow-up. A systemic approach to optimize blood glucose and blood pressure may halt progression to severe stages of DR and obviate the need for ocular treatment. Although there is evidence of benefit from fenofibrate or intravitreous antiVEGF treatment for eyes with nonproliferative DR (NPDR), these therapies are not standard care for NPDR at this time. Some patients with severe NPDR, especially those with type 2 diabetes, benefit from early panretinal photocoagulation (PRP). Once DR progresses to proliferative DR (PDR), treatment is often necessary to prevent visual loss. PRP remains mainstay treatment for PDR with high-risk characteristics. However, intravitreous antiVEGF injections appear to be a safe and effective treatment alternative for PDR through at least two years. Vitreoretinal surgery is indicated for PDR cases with non-clearing vitreous hemorrhage and/or tractional retinal detachment.

Gupta A, Cavallerano J, Sun JK, Silva PS. Evidence for Telemedicine for Diabetic Retinal Disease. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):22-28.Abstract

According to current projections, the number of Americans with diabetes mellitus will increase from 27.8 million in 2007 to 60.7 million in 2030. With the increasing gap between demand for eye care and supply of ophthalmologists and optometrists, and the non-uniform distribution of eye care providers in US counties, barriers to eye examinations will likely increase. Telemedicine assessment of diabetic retinal disease through remote retinal imaging and diagnosis has the potential to meet these growing demands. To establish evidence for a telemedicine program as an effective modality for diabetic retinopathy (DR) assessment, the interpretation of teleretinal images should compare favorably with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study film or digital photographs. We review the current evidence on the critical features and characteristics of ocular telehealth programs for DR in the following categories: image gradability, mydriasis, sensitivity and specificity, cost-effectiveness, long-term effectiveness, patient comfort and satisfaction, and improvement of patient related outcomes.

Carniciu AL, Chou J, Leskov I, Freitag SK. Clinical Presentation and Bacteriology of Eyebrow Infections: The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Experience (2008-2015). Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg 2017;33(5):372-375.Abstract
PURPOSE: This study retrospectively reviews preseptal cellulitis and abscesses involving the eyebrow to elucidate the bacteriology and potential causative factors. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify patients who had been diagnosed with preseptal cellulitis or abscess involving the eyebrow at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary between 2008 and 2015. Demographic, clinical, and microbiological data were collected. RESULTS: Eighty patients with eyebrow infections were identified, of whom 49 (61.3%) were female and 31 (38.7%) were male. The median age was 37 years (range 14-67 years). Eyebrow abscess was present in 54 cases (67.5%), while 26 cases (32.5%) were limited to preseptal cellulitis without abscess formation. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was found in 20 abscesses (39.2% of culture results), and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus was found in 12 abscesses (23.5% of culture results). Coagulase-negative staphylococci were present in 7 eyebrow abscesses (13.7% of culture results). Clinical history was remarkable for eyebrow hair removal (tweezing, waxing, threading, or shaving) in 17 cases (21.3%), manipulation of acne lesions ("popping," "picking," or "squeezing") in 6 cases (7.5%), and both brow hair removal and acne manipulation in 1 case (1.3%). CONCLUSIONS: There is a high incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the bacteriology of eyebrow infections. Empirical antibiotic coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus should be strongly considered in any patient with an eyebrow area abscess or preseptal cellulitis. Individuals who practice cosmetic eyebrow grooming should be encouraged to consider hygiene practices, which could reduce the risk of infection.
Palioura S, Colby K. Outcomes of Descemet Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty Using Eye Bank-Prepared Preloaded Grafts. Cornea 2017;36(1):21-25.Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility of Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty using grafts preloaded by an eye bank in a commercially available insertion device. METHODS: In this retrospective case series, a series of 35 eyes in 34 consecutive patients who underwent Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty for Fuchs endothelial dystrophy or previously failed full-thickness grafts at a single tertiary care center from March 2013 to March 2014 was included. The donor tissue had undergone pre-lamellar dissection, trephination, and loading into EndoGlide Ultrathin inserters at the Lions Eye Institute for Transplant and Research (Tampa, FL) and was shipped overnight in Optisol GS to the surgeon (K.C.). Surgery was performed within 24 hours from tissue preparation and loading by the eye bank. Donor and recipient characteristics, endothelial cell density (ECD), best-corrected visual acuity, and central corneal thickness were recorded. The main outcome measures were intraoperative and postoperative complications and ECD loss at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS: One primary graft failure (2.8%), 2 rebubblings (5.7%), and 1 graft rejection (2.8%) occurred. Mean preoperative donor ECD was 2821 ± 199 cells/mm. Six months postoperatively, the mean endothelial cell loss was 25.3% ± 17.2% (n = 32), which remained stable at 1 year (31.5% ± 17.9%, n = 32). Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 20/100 preoperatively to 20/25 at a mean follow-up of 1 year (n = 32). Mean central corneal thickness was reduced from 711 ± 110 μm to 638 ± 66 μm at the last follow-up visit. CONCLUSIONS: Donor graft tissue preloaded by an eye bank can be used successfully for endothelial keratoplasty. Preloading reduces intraoperative tissue manipulation.

Hafler BP. CLINICAL PROGRESS IN INHERITED RETINAL DEGENERATIONS: GENE THERAPY CLINICAL TRIALS AND ADVANCES IN GENETIC SEQUENCING. Retina 2017;37(3):417-423.Abstract

PURPOSE: Inherited retinal dystrophies are a significant cause of vision loss and are characterized by the loss of photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mutations in approximately 250 genes cause inherited retinal degenerations with a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. New techniques in next-generation sequencing are allowing the comprehensive analysis of all retinal disease genes thus changing the approach to the molecular diagnosis of inherited retinal dystrophies. This review serves to analyze clinical progress in genetic diagnostic testing and implications for retinal gene therapy. METHODS: A literature search of PubMed and OMIM was conducted to relevant articles in inherited retinal dystrophies. RESULTS: Next-generation genetic sequencing allows the simultaneous analysis of all the approximately 250 genes that cause inherited retinal dystrophies. Reported diagnostic rates range are high and range from 51% to 57%. These new sequencing tools are highly accurate with sensitivities of 97.9% and specificities of 100%. Retinal gene therapy clinical trials are underway for multiple genes including RPE65, ABCA4, CHM, RS1, MYO7A, CNGA3, CNGB3, ND4, and MERTK for which a molecular diagnosis may be beneficial for patients. CONCLUSION: Comprehensive next-generation genetic sequencing of all retinal dystrophy genes is changing the paradigm for how retinal specialists perform genetic testing for inherited retinal degenerations. Not only are high diagnostic yields obtained, but mutations in genes with novel clinical phenotypes are also identified. In the era of retinal gene therapy clinical trials, identifying specific genetic defects will increasingly be of use to identify patients who may enroll in clinical studies and benefit from novel therapies.

Liu S, Veldman P. Evidence-Based Endothelial Rehabilitation. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):96-103.Abstract

Endothelial keratoplasty (EK) has replaced penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) as the preferred surgical therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction. However, recent nationwide corneal graft registry data showed few advantages to EK relative to PKP with respect to graft survival and visual outcomes. This article compares the published outcomes and complications of EK to those of PKP. EK demonstrates superior spectacle corrected visual outcomes, fast recovery, less graft rejection, and higher patient satisfaction, particularly in studies performed by high-volume surgeons/centers. Endothelial cell loss in EK, while higher at early time points, was equivalent or superior at five-years' follow-up and graft survival was equivalent to or superior to PKP in these centers/studies. Continued standardization and simplification of EK procedures may allow surgeons who perform a lower volume of EK to achieve results that mirror those of high-volume centers/surgeons and close the potential gap in outcomes demonstrated in the registry data.

Gilbert AL, Koo EB, Heidary G. Evaluation and Management of Acute Acquired Comitant Esotropia in Children. Semin Ophthalmol 2017;32(1):8-13.Abstract

Acute acquired comitant esotropia (AACE) is characterized by a sudden-onset eye misalignment with an equal angle of deviation in all fields of gaze. This form of esotropia is distinct from common forms of childhood esotropia, such as infantile esotropia and accommodative esotropia, in the rapid tempo and typically later timing of onset; further, AACE is distinct from restrictive or paretic strabismus, which usually results in an incomitant angle of deviation that varies with the direction of gaze. The underlying etiologies for AACE are broad but, in some cases, it may be associated with significant neurologic disease. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to examine and summarize the current literature on AACE to provide a framework for the evaluation and management of this form of acquired strabismus.

Bujakowska KM, Fernandez-Godino R, Place E, Consugar M, Navarro-Gomez D, White J, Bedoukian EC, Zhu X, Xie HM, Gai X, Leroy BP, Pierce EA. Copy-number variation is an important contributor to the genetic causality of inherited retinal degenerations. Genet Med 2017;19(6):643-651.Abstract
PURPOSE: Despite substantial progress in sequencing, current strategies can genetically solve only approximately 55-60% of inherited retinal degeneration (IRD) cases. This can be partially attributed to elusive mutations in the known IRD genes, which are not easily identified by the targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) or Sanger sequencing approaches. We hypothesized that copy-number variations (CNVs) are a major contributor to the elusive genetic causality of IRDs. METHODS: Twenty-eight cases previously unsolved with a targeted NGS were investigated with whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays. RESULTS: Deletions in the IRD genes were detected in 5 of 28 families, including a de novo deletion. We suggest that the de novo deletion occurred through nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) and we constructed a genomic map of NAHR-prone regions with overlapping IRD genes. In this article, we also report an unusual case of recessive retinitis pigmentosa due to compound heterozygous mutations in SNRNP200, a gene that is typically associated with the dominant form of this disease. CONCLUSIONS: CNV mapping substantially increased the genetic diagnostic rate of IRDs, detecting genetic causality in 18% of previously unsolved cases. Extending the search to other structural variations will probably demonstrate an even higher contribution to genetic causality of IRDs.Genet Med advance online publication 13 October 2016.

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