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Vazirani J, Ali MH, Sharma N, Gupta N, Mittal V, Atallah M, Amescua G, Chowdhury T, Abdala-Figuerola A, Ramirez-Miranda A, Navas A, Graue-Hernández EO, Chodosh J. Autologous simple limbal epithelial transplantation for unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency: multicentre results. Br J Ophthalmol 2016;100(10):1416-20.Abstract

PURPOSE: To report outcomes of autologous simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) performed for unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) at multiple centres worldwide. METHODS: In this retrospective, multicentre, interventional case series, records of patients who had undergone autologous SLET for unilateral LSCD, with a minimum of 6 months of follow-up, were reviewed. The primary outcome measure was clinical success, defined as a completely epithelised, avascular corneal surface. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed and survival probability was calculated. A Cox proportional hazards analysis was done to assess association of preoperative characteristics with risk of failure. Secondary outcome measures included the percentage of eyes achieving visual acuity of 20/200 or better, percentage of eyes gaining two or more Snellen lines and complications encountered. RESULTS: 68 eyes of 68 patients underwent autologous SLET, performed across eight centres in three countries. Clinical success was achieved in 57 cases (83.8%). With a median follow-up of 12 months, survival probability exceeded 80%. Presence of symblepharon (HR 5.8) and simultaneous keratoplasty (HR 10.8) were found to be significantly associated with a risk of failure. 44 eyes (64.7%) achieved a visual acuity of 20/200 or better, and 44 eyes (64.7%) gained two or more Snellen lines. Focal recurrences of pannus were noted in 21 eyes (36.8%) with clinical success. CONCLUSION: Autologous SLET is an effective and safe modality for treatment of unilateral LSCD. Clinical success rates and visual acuity improvement are equal to or better than those reported with earlier techniques.

Kim YJ, Payal AR, Daly MK. Effects of tear gases on the eye. Surv Ophthalmol 2016;61(4):434-42.Abstract

Chemical agents that target the eyes have been a popular choice for law enforcement during riots and for military training for nearly a century. The most commonly used agents are chloroacetophenone (formerly sold as Mace), o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile, and oleoresin capsicum (OC or pepper spray, current ingredient for Mace). Initially, most severe ocular injuries were caused by the explosive force rather than the chemical itself. The development of sprays reduced the mechanical severity of ocular injuries, but resulted in a variety of chemical injuries. The effects on eyes include conjunctival injection, complete corneal epithelial defects, pseudopterygium, corneal neovascularization, persistent conjunctivalization, corneal opacities, and reduced visual acuity. Current management, based on limited human studies, emphasizes decontamination and symptomatic treatment. We review the literature related to clinical and histopathologic effects of tear gas agents on the eye and their management.

Wolfe JM, Aizenman AM, Boettcher SEP, Cain MS. Hybrid foraging search: Searching for multiple instances of multiple types of target. Vision Res 2016;119:50-9.Abstract

This paper introduces the "hybrid foraging" paradigm. In typical visual search tasks, observers search for one instance of one target among distractors. In hybrid search, observers search through visual displays for one instance of any of several types of target held in memory. In foraging search, observers collect multiple instances of a single target type from visual displays. Combining these paradigms, in hybrid foraging tasks observers search visual displays for multiple instances of any of several types of target (as might be the case in searching the kitchen for dinner ingredients or an X-ray for different pathologies). In the present experiment, observers held 8-64 target objects in memory. They viewed displays of 60-105 randomly moving photographs of objects and used the computer mouse to collect multiple targets before choosing to move to the next display. Rather than selecting at random among available targets, observers tended to collect items in runs of one target type. Reaction time (RT) data indicate searching again for the same item is more efficient than searching for any other targets, held in memory. Observers were trying to maximize collection rate. As a result, and consistent with optimal foraging theory, they tended to leave 25-33% of targets uncollected when moving to the next screen/patch. The pattern of RTs shows that while observers were collecting a target item, they had already begun searching memory and the visual display for additional targets, making the hybrid foraging task a useful way to investigate the interaction of visual and memory search.

Vodopivec I, Prasad S. Treatment of Susac Syndrome. Curr Treat Options Neurol 2016;18(1):3.Abstract

OPINION STATEMENT: Susac syndrome is a microangiopathy of the brain, retina, and cochlea. Several lines of evidence support the concept that this disease is an acquired autoimmune disorder. Prospective, randomized, controlled studies of treatments are not available because the disease is rare. Furthermore, the average period of follow-up in reported cases is short, limiting a complete understanding of the natural history of the disease. Empirical treatment strategies are therefore based upon expert recommendations and anecdotal reports of response to various immunomodulators, and the appropriate duration of therapy is not known. In our opinion, the encephalopathic form of Susac syndrome should be treated early and aggressively to avoid cognitive dysfunction and disability. Induction therapy with pulse methylprednisolone frequently proves to be inadequate. Additional agents, including intravenous immunoglobulins, intravenous cyclophosphamide, or rituximab are often necessary to induce a sustained remission. Maintenance therapy with oral glucocorticoids combined with intravenous immunoglobulins, mycophenolate mofetil, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, or rituximab is typically necessary to achieve a sustained remission. Aspirin may be used as an adjunctive agent, although evidence showing efficacy is scant. The response to treatment should be closely monitored by frequent clinical examinations, brain MRI, and fluorescein angiography. Once disease remission has been established, it appears prudent to continue maintenance treatment for at least two additional years, although the real long-term risk of future relapses remains unknown. Establishing a multicenter patient registry and biorepository is essential to study the pathogenesis of the disease, further define the duration of disease, identify reliable biomarkers that aid early diagnosis and assess risk of relapse, and develop effective disease-specific therapies.

Afrogheh AH, Jakobiec FA, Hammon R, Grossniklaus HE, Rocco J, Lindeman NI, Sadow PM, Faquin WC. Evaluation for High-risk HPV in Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Precursor Lesions Arising in the Conjunctiva and Lacrimal Sac. Am J Surg Pathol 2016;40(4):519-28.Abstract

High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) is a well-established causative agent of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In addition, HR-HPV has occasionally been reported to be present in dysplastic and malignant lesions of the conjunctiva and lacrimal sac, although its overall incidence and etiological role in periocular SCC are controversial. Sequential surgical samples of 52 combined cases of invasive SCC (I-SCC) and SCC in situ (SCCIS) from 2 periocular sites (conjunctiva and lacrimal sac) diagnosed over a 14-year period (2000 to 2014) were selected for evaluation, and relevant patient characteristics were documented. p16 immunohistochemistry was performed as a screening test. All p16-positive cases were further evaluated for HR-HPV using DNA in situ hybridization (DNA ISH), and a subset was also analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 43 ocular surface squamous neoplasias (OSSNs), 30% (n=13; 8 SCCIS and 5 I-SCC cases) were positive for HR-HPV. HPV-positive OSSNs occurred in 8 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60 years (range, 39 to 94 y). HPV type-16 was detected in all conjunctival cases evaluated by PCR. All 5 conjunctival I-SCCs were nonkeratinizing (n=4) or partially keratinizing (n=1) and managed by simple excision. In contrast, HPV-negative conjunctival I-SCCs were predominantly keratinizing (11 keratinizing and 2 nonkeratinizing). Of 9 lacrimal sac I-SCCs (LSSCCs), 66.7% (n=6) were positive for HR-HPV by p16 and DNA ISH; HPV subtypes were HPV-16 (n=5) and HPV-58 (n=1). In addition, 2 p16-positive cases with negative DNA ISH results were HR-HPV positive (HPV-16 and HPV-33) when evaluated by PCR, suggesting that the rate of HR-HPV positivity among the LSSCCs may be as high as 89% (n=8). The combined group of HR-HPV-positive LSSCCs was seen in 4 men and 4 women with a mean age of 60 years (range, 34 to 71 y). Seven of the 8 HPV-positive LSSCCs (87.5%) had a nonkeratinizing or partially keratinizing histomorphology, whereas 1 case (12.5%) was predominantly keratinizing. The presence of HR-HPV in 30% of OSSNs and at least 66.7% of LSSCCs suggests the possibility of an etiologic role for HR-HPV at these sites.

Chao W, Belmonte C, Benitez Del Castillo J, Bron A, Dua H, Nichols K, Novack G, Schrader S, Willcox M, Wolffsohn J, Sullivan DA. Report of the Inaugural Meeting of the TFOS i2 = initiating innovation Series: Targeting the Unmet Need for Dry Eye Treatment (London, United Kingdom, March 21, 2015). Ocul Surf 2016;Abstract

In March 2015, a meeting was held in London, United Kingdom, to address the progress in targeting the unmet need for dry eye disease (DED) treatment. The meeting, which launched the i(2) = initiating innovation series, was sponsored by the Tear Film & Ocular Surface Society (TFOS; www.TearFilm.org) and supported by Dompé. The TFOS i(2) meeting was designed to review advances in the understanding of DED since publication of the 2007 TFOS International Dry Eye WorkShop (DEWS) report, and to help launch the highly anticipated sequel, DEWS II. The meeting was structured to discuss the scope of the DED problem, to review the clinical challenges of DED, and to consider the treatment challenges of DED. This article provides a synopsis of the presentations of this TFOS i(2) meeting.

Ginat DT, Glass LRD, Yanoga F, Lee NG, Freitag SK. Lacrimal gland abscess presenting with preseptal cellulitis depicted on CT. J Ophthalmic Inflamm Infect 2016;6(1):1.Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pyogenic lacrimal gland abscesses are uncommon and thus may not be immediately clinically recognized without a high index of suspicion. FINDINGS: We present two patients with preseptal cellulitis and characteristic low-attenuation fluid collections in the lacrimal glands demonstrated on computed tomography (CT). CONCLUSIONS: Lacrimal gland abscesses should be considered when dacryoadenitis is refractory to medical treatment. Indeed, these cases highlight the value of prompt recognition of lacrimal abscess through ophthalmologic referral and the use of diagnostic imaging. Both patients were successfully treated via incision and drainage.

Jiang D, Xiao X, Fu T, Mashaghi A, Liu Q, Hong J. Transient Tear Film Dysfunction after Cataract Surgery in Diabetic Patients. PLoS One 2016;11(1):e0146752.Abstract

PURPOSE: Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common systemic disease. Many diabetic patients seek cataract surgery for a better visual acuity. Unlike in the general population, the influence of cataract surgery on tear film function in diabetic patients remains elusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tear function in diabetic and nondiabetic patients following cataract surgery. METHODS: In this prospective, interventional case series, 174 diabetic patients without dry eye syndrome (DES) and 474 age-matched nondiabetic patients as control who underwent phacoemulsification were enrolled at two different eye centers between January 2011 and January 2013. Patients were followed up at baseline and at 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Ocular symptom scores (Ocular Surface Disease Index, OSDI) and tear film function including tear film stability (tear film break-up time, TBUT), corneal epithelium integrity (corneal fluorescein staining, CFS), and tear secretion (Schirmer's I test, SIT) were evaluated. RESULTS: In total, 83.9% of the diabetic patients (146 cases with 185 eyes) and 89.0% of the nondiabetic patients (422 cases with 463 eyes) completed all check-ups after the interventions (P = 0.095). The incidence of DES was 17.1% in the diabetic patients and 8.1% in the nondiabetic patients at 7 days after cataract surgery. In the diabetic patients, the incidence of DES remained 4.8% at 1 month postoperatively and decreased to zero at 3 months after surgery. No DES was diagnosed in nondiabetic patients at either the 1-month or 3-month follow-up. Compared with the baseline, the diabetic patients had worse symptom scores and lower TBUT values at 7 days and 1 month but not at 3 months postoperatively. In the nondiabetic patients, symptom scores and TBUT values had returned to preoperative levels at 1-month check-up. CFS scores and SIT values did not change significantly postoperatively in either group (P = 0.916 and P = 0.964, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery are prone to DES. Ocular symptoms and tear film stability are transiently worsened in diabetic patients and are restored more slowly than those in nondiabetic patients.

Coleman AL, Lum FC, Velentgas P, Su Z, Gliklich RE, Gliklich RE. Impact of treatment strategies for open angle glaucoma on intraocular pressure: the RiGOR study. J Comp Eff Res 2016;5(1):87-98.Abstract

AIMS: The RiGOR study's primary outcome measure was a 15% reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP) for patients with open-angle glaucoma at 1 year. METHODS: Patients received treatment according to the ophthalmologist's usual practice. RESULTS: A higher proportion of patients in the incisional and other surgery group achieved a 15% reduction in IOP than in the laser surgery or additional medication groups (82, 57, and 57% respectively). In multivariate regression analyses, incisional surgery patients were 2.7-times as likely as patients treated with additional medication to achieve a 15% reduction in IOP (odds ratio: 2.67; 95% CI: 2.01-3.57). CONCLUSION: Incisional and other surgical procedures are effective treatments. There were no differences in treatment response by race or ethnicity.

Beier KT, Mundell NA, Pan AY, Cepko CL. Anterograde or Retrograde Transsynaptic Circuit Tracing in Vertebrates with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors. Curr Protoc Neurosci 2016;74:1.26.1-1.26.27.Abstract

Viruses have been used as transsynaptic tracers, allowing one to map the inputs and outputs of neuronal populations, due to their ability to replicate in neurons and transmit in vivo only across synaptically connected cells. To date, their use has been largely restricted to mammals. In order to explore the use of such viruses in an expanded host range, we tested the transsynaptic tracing ability of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) vectors in a variety of organisms. Successful infection and gene expression were achieved in a wide range of organisms, including vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms. Moreover, rVSV enabled transsynaptic tracing of neural circuitry in predictable directions dictated by the viral envelope glycoprotein (G), derived from either VSV or rabies virus (RABV). Anterograde and retrograde labeling, from initial infection and/or viral replication and transmission, was observed in Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, jellyfish, zebrafish, chickens, and mice. These vectors are widely applicable for gene delivery, afferent tract tracing, and/or directional connectivity mapping. Here, we detail the use of these vectors and provide protocols for propagating virus, changing the surface glycoprotein, and infecting multiple organisms using several injection strategies. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Bailey JCN, Loomis SJ, Kang JH, Allingham RR, Gharahkhani P, Khor CC, Burdon KP, Aschard H, Chasman DI, Igo RP, Hysi PG, Glastonbury CA, Ashley-Koch A, Brilliant M, Brown AA, Budenz DL, Buil A, Cheng C-Y, Choi H, Christen WG, Curhan G, De Vivo I, Fingert JH, Foster PJ, Fuchs C, Gaasterland D, Gaasterland T, Hewitt AW, Hu F, Hunter DJ, Khawaja AP, Lee RK, Li Z, Lichter PR, Mackey DA, McGuffin P, Mitchell P, Moroi SE, Perera SA, Pepper KW, Qi Q, Realini T, Richards JE, Ridker PM, Rimm E, Ritch R, Ritchie M, Schuman JS, Scott WK, Singh K, Sit AJ, Song YE, Tamimi RM, Topouzis F, Viswanathan AC, Verma SS, Vollrath D, Wang JJ, Weisschuh N, Wissinger B, Wollstein G, Wong TY, Yaspan BL, Zack DJ, Zhang K, Study E-NE, Study E-NE, Weinreb RN, Pericak-Vance MA, Small K, Hammond CJ, Aung T, Liu Y, Vithana EN, Macgregor S, Craig JE, Kraft P, Howell G, Hauser MA, Pasquale LR, Haines JL, Wiggs JL. Genome-wide association analysis identifies TXNRD2, ATXN2 and FOXC1 as susceptibility loci for primary open-angle glaucoma. Nat Genet 2016;48(2):189-94.Abstract

Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed meta-analysis on genome-wide association study (GWAS) results from eight independent studies from the United States (3,853 cases and 33,480 controls) and investigated the most significantly associated SNPs in two Australian studies (1,252 cases and 2,592 controls), three European studies (875 cases and 4,107 controls) and a Singaporean Chinese study (1,037 cases and 2,543 controls). A meta-analysis of the top SNPs identified three new associated loci: rs35934224[T] in TXNRD2 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.78, P = 4.05 × 10(-11)) encoding a mitochondrial protein required for redox homeostasis; rs7137828[T] in ATXN2 (OR = 1.17, P = 8.73 × 10(-10)); and rs2745572[A] upstream of FOXC1 (OR = 1.17, P = 1.76 × 10(-10)). Using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, we show TXNRD2 and ATXN2 expression in retinal ganglion cells and the optic nerve head. These results identify new pathways underlying POAG susceptibility and suggest new targets for preventative therapies.

Yu G, Duguay J, Marra KV, Gautam S, Le Guern G, Begum S, Sharifzadeh A, Arroyo JG. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR VITREOMACULAR TRACTION: A Case Series and Meta-Analysis. Retina 2016;36(7):1260-70.Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate treatment options for vitreomacular traction (VMT). METHODS: A retrospective, consecutive case series and a literature search with Boolean search logic. A random-effects meta-analysis was conducted to combine the rates of VMT resolution per treatment. Patients from studies analyzed were placed into cohorts based on the treatment received. RESULTS: CASE SERIES: Zero of 10 control, 3 of 7 intravitreal ocriplasmin (IVO, P = 0.10), 7 of 8 intravitreal expansile gas (pneumatic vitreolysis, PV, P < 0.01), and 10 of 10 pars plana vitrectomy (P < 0.01)-treated eyes experienced VMT release (VMTr) at Day 28. No patients developed retinal tears or detachment. One PV-treated (12.5%) eye developed a macular hole. Meta-analysis: Twenty-three of 131 prospective or retrospective and consecutive articles were included. Sixty-three eyes were treated with PV, 726 eyes were treated with intravitreal ocriplasmin, and 253 eyes were characterized as the control group (saline injection). The weighted rate of VMT resolution for the control group was 0.09 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.06-0.13), PV was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.76-0.92), and intravitreal ocriplasmin was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.23-0.29). CONCLUSION: Our analysis found that PV releases VMT in most patients and suggest that PV may be as effective or superior to nonsurgical options for VMTr at Day 28 with a similar risk profile.

Coleman AL, Lum FC, Velentgas P, Campion D, Su Z, Gliklich RE, Gliklich RE. RiGOR: a prospective observational study comparing the effectiveness of treatment strategies for open-angle glaucoma. J Comp Eff Res 2016;5(1):65-78.Abstract

AIMS: The RigOR study was designed to assess comparative effectiveness of medications, laser trabeculoplasty and incisional surgery in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) in the community initiating a new or additional course of therapy as judged necessary by their ophthalmologist. This paper focuses specifically on demographic and clinical characteristics of OAG patients at enrollment. PATIENTS & METHODS: A total of 2597 with OAG already on medical therapy were enrolled from 45 community and academic practices throughout the USA. RESULTS: Overall, 784 (30%) patients were treated with laser surgery, 436 with other surgical procedures (17%), and 1377 with additional medication (53%). Patients had mild (35%) or moderate (31%) glaucoma, with 28% with severe glaucoma. CONCLUSION: The RiGOR study enrolled a diverse population and will provide valuable information regarding visual function and treatment patterns among different racial/ethnic populations. African-American and Hispanic patients entered the study with poorer visual acuity and more severe glaucoma.

Faez S, Lobo A-M, Unizony SH, Stone JH, Papaliodis GN, Sobrin L. Ocular inflammatory disease in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica: A case series and review of the literature. Clin Rheumatol 2016;35(1):251-8.Abstract

Scleritis and uveitis are potentially blinding conditions that can be associated with systemic inflammatory diseases. Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a common rheumatic disorder of the elderly of uncertain etiology. Although there are a few published reports of scleritis and uveitis in PMR patients, the association of PMR to ocular inflammation has not been well established. The aim of this study is to report a series of PMR patients with scleritis and/or uveitis and review the prior published reports of this potential association. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of patients with PMR and scleritis or uveitis who were examined in the Ocular Immunology Service of Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. We also performed a systematic literature search (PubMed; January 1990 until January 2014) to identify earlier published reports. Seven PMR patients with ocular inflammatory disease (OID) were included in our study: two with scleritis, three with anterior uveitis, and two with panuveitis. The onset of PMR preceded the occurrence of OID in six patients, and in one patient uveitis developed 2 months prior to PMR. Five patients demonstrated a temporal association between flares of PMR and OID. In four patients, OID flares developed during tapering of systemic prednisone prescribed for PMR. Four of the five patients who had relapsing PMR had recurrent or persistent uveitis over the course of follow-up. PMR may be associated with both scleritis and uveitis and should be considered as a possible underlying cause of OID.

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