All

Oke I, Elhusseiny AM, Shah AS, Hunter DG. Botulinum Toxin Injection of the Inferior Oblique Muscles for V-Pattern Strabismus and Primary Position Hypertropia. Am J Ophthalmol 2022;235:32-37.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate outcomes of botulinum toxin (BTX) injection of the inferior oblique (IO) muscle. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: Setting: Single center, ophthalmology department at Boston Children's Hospital. STUDY POPULATION: All patients treated with IO muscle injection of BTX (onabotulinumtoxinA) between 2010 and 2020. OBSERVATION PROCEDURE: Sensorimotor evaluations at short-term (<2 months), medium-term (2-4 months), and long-term (≥4 months) intervals. OUTCOME MEASURE: Primary outcomes included median improvement in V-pattern strabismus and primary position hypertropia. Secondary outcomes included IO muscle overaction. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed to identify differences before and after injection. RESULTS: Record review identified 20 patients with a median age of 4.5 (range, 1-69) years. Median BTX dose injected (31 IO muscles) was 5.0 (range, 3.0-7.0) units. Indications included V-pattern strabismus (N = 8), hypertropia (N = 7), or both (N = 5). Median long-term interval was 6.4 (range, 4.1-26.6) months. Injections were concurrent with treatment of horizontal strabismus in all but 3 cases. Median V-pattern magnitude changed from 10 prism diopters (PD) preoperatively to 0 PD short-term (P = .006) and 3.5 PD long-term (P = .34). Median hypertropia changed from 8.5 PD preoperatively to 1.5 PD short-term (P = .01) and 8 PD long-term (P = .87). Median IO muscle overaction grade improved significantly at short-term (P < .001) and long-term (P = .007) intervals. There were no complications associated with the IO muscle injections. CONCLUSIONS: BTX injection of the IO muscles can be a useful adjunct to the management of V-pattern strabismus. Intervention for primary position hypertropia may be helpful for short-term relief with no expectation of long-term benefit.
Kretz AM, Vongsachang H, Friedman DS, Callan J, Wahl M, Mukherjee RM, Neitzel A, Collins ME. Stakeholders' Perceptions of a School-Based Eye Care Programme in Baltimore, MD. Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2022;29(3):252-261.Abstract
PURPOSE: To explore stakeholders' perceptions of a school-based vision programme (SBVP). METHODS: We conducted 20 focus groups with 105 parents and teachers at schools in Baltimore, MD, that participated in a SBVP. Facilitators used a semi-structured interview guide to discuss participants' perceptions of the SBVP. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Participant perceptions fell into three categories: benefits of school-based eye care, limitations of school-based eye care, and observation of impact. The majority of participants had positive comments about the programme; benefits included convenience (location, time, and cost), the comprehensive nature of the programme, the quality of the eyeglasses and ability to receive replacements, and a positive screening/exam experience. Limitations of programme impact were related to communication and organisation, the time to receive the glasses, missed instructional time, and uncertainty about screenings. Observations of impact included academic and classroom improvements, as well as visual and other health improvements. CONCLUSION: Parents and teachers reported mostly positive perceptions regarding the SBVP. Their appreciation for the convenience underscores that location, cost, time, and comprehensive services are crucial aspects for implementing a successful programme. To maximize impact, programs must also implement robust communication campaigns that integrate into the schools' workflow to help parents and teachers stay engaged in the process from start to finish.
Català P, Thuret G, Skottman H, Mehta JS, Parekh M, Ní Dhubhghaill S, Collin RWJ, Nuijts RMMA, Ferrari S, LaPointe VLS, Dickman MM. Approaches for corneal endothelium regenerative medicine. Prog Retin Eye Res 2022;87:100987.Abstract
The state of the art therapy for treating corneal endothelial disease is transplantation. Advances in the reproducibility and accessibility of surgical techniques are increasing the number of corneal transplants, thereby causing a global deficit of donor corneas and leaving 12.7 million patients with addressable visual impairment. Approaches to regenerate the corneal endothelium offer a solution to the current tissue scarcity and a treatment to those in need. Methods for generating corneal endothelial cells into numbers that could address the current tissue shortage and the possible strategies used to deliver them have now become a therapeutic reality with clinical trials taking place in Japan, Singapore and Mexico. Nevertheless, there is still a long way before such therapies are approved by regulatory bodies and become clinical practice. Moreover, acellular corneal endothelial graft equivalents and certain drugs could provide a treatment option for specific disease conditions without the need of donor tissue or cells. Finally, with the emergence of gene modulation therapies to treat corneal endothelial disease, it would be possible to treat presymptomatic patients or those presenting early symptoms, drastically reducing the need for donor tissue. It is necessary to understand the most recent developments in this rapidly evolving field to know which conditions could be treated with which approach. This article provides an overview of the current and developing regenerative medicine therapies to treat corneal endothelial disease and provides the necessary guidance and understanding towards the treatment of corneal endothelial disease.
Chinn RN, Michalak SM, Shoshany TN, Bishop K, Staffa SJ, Hunter DG. Effect of Sequential and Simultaneous Patching Regimens in Unilateral Amblyopia. Am J Ophthalmol 2022;233:48-56.Abstract
PURPOSE: Many clinicians treat unilateral amblyopia with glasses alone and initiate patching when needed; others start glasses and patching simultaneously. In this study, we reviewed the outcomes of the two approaches at our institution. DESIGN: Retrospective nonrandomized clinical trial. METHODS: Setting: Institutional practice. PATIENT POPULATION: All patients diagnosed with amblyopia at Boston Children's Hospital between 2010 and 2014. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Unilateral amblyopia (visual acuity (VA) 20/40 to 20/200 with interocular difference ≥3 lines,) age 3 to 12 years, with a 6-month follow-up visit. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Deprivation amblyopia, prior amblyopia treatment, treatment other than patching, surgery. Patients were categorized as "simultaneous treatment" (concurrent glasses and patching therapy at their first visit) or "sequential treatment" (glasses alone at first visit, followed by patching therapy at second visit.) Observation procedures: Patient demographics, VA, and stereopsis were compared. OUTCOME MEASURES: VA and stereopsis at the last visit on treatment. RESULTS: We identified 98 patients who met inclusion criteria: 36 received simultaneous treatment and 62 sequential treatment. Median amblyopic eye VA improved similarly between the simultaneous (∆0.40; interquartile range [IQR], 0.56-0.30 logMAR) and sequential (∆0.40; IQR, 0.52-0.27 logMAR) groups. Patients without stereopsis at first visit had better stereopsis outcomes with sequential treatment (5.12 [IQR, 4.00-7.51] log stereopsis) compared with simultaneous treatment (8.01 [IQR, 5.65-9.21]) log stereopsis, P = 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: VA improved approximately 4 lines regardless of treatment type. For children without stereopsis at first presentation, sequential patching yielded better stereopsis outcomes. These findings require further validation and highlight the importance of evaluating stereopsis in future studies.
Habib LA, North VS, Freitag SK, Yoon MK, Lefebvre DR, Lee NG. Medical comorbidities and orbital implant exposure. Acta Ophthalmol 2022;100(3):e813-e819.Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate medical conditions and systemic therapies associated with orbital implant exposure in patients with anophthalmic sockets. METHODS: Retrospective review of patients who underwent enucleation or evisceration at a single centre between January 1, 2008 and March 1, 2018. Medical comorbidities, including peripheral or coronary artery disease, rheumatologic conditions, diabetes, malignancy and history of smoking were recorded. Use of immunomodulatory and anticoagulation therapy at the time of eye removal was noted. Patients were divided into two groups-those with implant exposure and those without. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to compare groups. RESULTS: Two hundred and twenty-nine patients underwent eye removal surgery over a ten-year period. Implant exposure was seen in 20 (8.7%) patients. Univariate analysis revealed a statistically significant difference between groups in rates of smoking, malignancy, and immunomodulatory therapy at the time of surgery. A history of smoking (HR = 11.72; 95% CI: 2.95, 46.53; p = 0.0001) and immunomodulatory therapy (HR = 8.02; 95% CI: 1.96, 32.87; p = 0.004) were independent predictors of exposure. The probability of exposure was 81.2% when all three risk factors were present versus 4.4% when none were present (c-index = 0.737, 95% CI: 0.608, 0.865; p < 0.001). The model was a good fit to the data (Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test p = 0.475). CONCLUSIONS: Smoking and immunomodulatory therapy were associated with orbital implant exposure in patients with anophthalmic sockets. This is the first report examining medical comorbidities in patients with orbital implant exposure. Understanding the pathophysiology of implant exposure is crucial to preoperative planning and postoperative care.
Neerukonda VK, Stagner AM, Wolkow N. Lymphoma of the Lacrimal Sac: The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Experience With a Comparison to the Previously Reported Literature. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2022;38(1):79-86.Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the frequency, clinical features, and histologic subtypes of biopsy proven lacrimal sac lymphomas, and to compare these results to the previously published literature. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed at a single institution from 2004 to 2017. Pathology reports, operative notes, and patients' medical charts were reviewed. RESULTS: Of 566 lacrimal sacs submitted for routine histopathologic evaluation, 16 cases of lymphoma were identified. All were low-grade, non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, biopsied at an average age of 71 years. Thirteen patients (81.25%) had a pre-existing lymphoma diagnosis; the average interval between the diagnosis of systemic or nonocular adnexal lymphoma and lacrimal sac lymphoma was 7.9 years (range 2-26 years; median 5.5 years). Three cases of primary lacrimal sac lymphoma were identified. Histopathology showed 3 cases (18.75%) of follicular lymphoma, 3 (18.75%) of extranodal marginal zone lymphoma, and 10 (62.5%) of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma. Primary cases presented with epiphora and nasolacrimal duct obstruction, while secondary cases predominantly manifested as dacryocystitis. All lacrimal sac neoplasms were locally responsive (without local recurrence) to chemotherapy, radiation, or both. CONCLUSIONS: Lacrimal sac lymphoma is uncommon but should be suspected among patients with known lymphoma who develop dacryocystitis. In this series, primary lacrimal sac lymphoma most often presented as a mass or nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma was the most commonly identified cause of secondary lacrimal sac lymphoma. Distinguishing primary from secondary lacrimal sac lymphomas is important, as the extent of disease and histopathologic subtypes differ, which may affect patient management.
Sobrin L, Susarla G, Stanwyck L, Rouhana JM, Li A, Pollack S, Igo RP, Jensen RA, Li X, Ng MCY, Smith AV, Kuo JZ, Taylor KD, Freedman BI, Bowden DW, Penman A, Chen CJ, Craig JE, Adler SG, Chew EY, Cotch MF, Yaspan B, Mitchell P, Wang JJ, Klein BEK, Wong TY, Rotter JI, Burdon KP, Iyengar SK, Segrè AV. Gene Set Enrichment Analsyes Identify Pathways Involved in Genetic Risk for Diabetic Retinopathy. Am J Ophthalmol 2022;233:111-123.Abstract
To identify functionally related genes associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) risk using gene set enrichment analyses applied to genome-wide association study meta-analyses. METHODS: We analyzed DR GWAS meta-analyses performed on 3246 Europeans and 2611 African Americans with type 2 diabetes. Gene sets relevant to 5 key DR pathophysiology processes were investigated: tissue injury, vascular events, metabolic events and glial dysregulation, neuronal dysfunction, and inflammation. Keywords relevant to these processes were queried in 4 pathway and ontology databases. Two GSEA methods, Meta-Analysis Gene set Enrichment of variaNT Associations (MAGENTA) and Multi-marker Analysis of GenoMic Annotation (MAGMA), were used. Gene sets were defined to be enriched for gene associations with DR if the P value corrected for multiple testing (Pcorr) was <.05. RESULTS: Five gene sets were significantly enriched for numerous modest genetic associations with DR in one method (MAGENTA or MAGMA) and also at least nominally significant (uncorrected P < .05) in the other method. These pathways were regulation of the lipid catabolic process (2-fold enrichment, Pcorr = .014); nitric oxide biosynthesis (1.92-fold enrichment, Pcorr = .022); lipid digestion, mobilization, and transport (1.6-fold enrichment, P = .032); apoptosis (1.53-fold enrichment, P = .041); and retinal ganglion cell degeneration (2-fold enrichment, Pcorr = .049). The interferon gamma (IFNG) gene, previously implicated in DR by protein-protein interactions in our GWAS, was among the top ranked genes in the nitric oxide pathway (best variant P = .0001). CONCLUSIONS: These GSEA indicate that variants in genes involved in oxidative stress, lipid transport and catabolism, and cell degeneration are enriched for genes associated with DR risk. NOTE: Publication of this article is sponsored by the American Ophthalmological Society.
Belinsky I, Creighton FX, Mahoney N, Petris CK, Callahan AB, Campbell AA, Kazim M, Lee HHB, Yoon MK, Dagi Glass LR. Teprotumumab and Hearing Loss: Case Series and Proposal for Audiologic Monitoring. Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg 2022;38(1):73-78.Abstract
PURPOSE: To present a protocol for audiologic monitoring in the setting of teprotumumab treatment of thyroid eye disease, motivated by 4 cases of significant hearing loss, and review the relevant literature. METHODS: Cases of hearing loss in the setting of teprotumumab were retrospectively elicited as part of a multi-institutional focus group, including oculoplastic surgeons, a neurotologist and an endocrinologist. A literature review was performed. RESULTS: An aggregate of 4 cases of teprotumumab-associated hearing loss documented by formal audiologic testing were identified among 3 clinicians who had treated 28 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Teprotumumab may cause a spectrum of potentially irreversible hearing loss ranging from mild to severe, likely resulting from the inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor pathway. Due to the novelty of teprotumumab and the lack of a comprehensive understanding of its effect on hearing, the authors endorse prospective investigations of hearing loss in the setting of teprotumumab treatment. Until the results of such studies are available, the authors think it prudent to adopt a surveillance protocol to include an audiogram and tympanometry before, during and after infusion, and when prompted by new symptoms of hearing dysfunction.
Tao JP, Aakalu VK, Freitag SK, Sobel RK, Foster JA, Wladis EJ, McCulley TJ, Yen MT. Homeopathic Agents or Vitamins in Reducing Ecchymosis after Oculofacial Surgery: A Report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2022;129(2):220-226.Abstract
PURPOSE: To review the published literature to determine the efficacy and safety of homeopathic agents or vitamins in reducing ecchymosis after oculofacial surgery or laser surgery. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in the PubMed database initially in December 2019 and updated in March 2020 to identify all studies in the English language literature on the use of homeopathic agents or vitamins in oculofacial procedures, including laser surgery. The search yielded 124 citations, and 11 articles met all inclusion criteria for this assessment. A panel methodologist then assigned a level of evidence rating for each study. Eleven studies met inclusion criteria; 9 were rated level I, and 2 were rated level III. RESULTS: The agents studied in the articles identified included oral or topical Arnica montana (AM), oral Melilotus extract, topical vitamin K oxide, and topical AM combined with Rhododendron tomentosum. Metrics to describe ecchymosis varied. In 7 controlled studies, perioperative AM provided no or negligible benefit versus placebo. In 2 studies, vitamin K cream was equivalent to placebo. One study of oral Melilotus extract had less ecchymosis compared with controls in paranasal and eyelid ecchymosis at postoperative day (POD) 7, but not at PODs 1 and 4. A lone cohort study of combined topical AM and R. tomentosum lacked objective metrics and adequate controls. No serious side effects from administration of homeopathic agents or vitamins were identified. CONCLUSIONS: The current literature does not support the use of AM, vitamin K oxide, R. tomentosum, or Melilotus extract for reducing ecchymosis after oculofacial surgery or pulsed dye laser surgery.
Maleki A, Anesi SD, Look-Why S, Manhapra A, Foster SC. Pediatric uveitis: A comprehensive review. Surv Ophthalmol 2022;67(2):510-529.Abstract
Pediatric uveitis accounts for 5-10% of all uveitis. Uveitis in children differs from adult uveitis in that it is commonly asymptomatic and can become chronic and cause damage to ocular structures. The diagnosis might be delayed for multiple reasons, including the preverbal age and difficulties in examining young children. Pediatric uveitis may be infectious or noninfectious in etiology. The etiology of noninfectious uveitis is presumed to be autoimmune or autoinflammatory. The most common causes of uveitis in this age group are idiopathic and juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis. The stepladder approach for the treatment of pediatric uveitis is based on expert opinion and algorithms proposed by multidisciplinary panels. Uveitis morbidities in pediatric patients include cataract, glaucoma, and amblyopia. Pediatric patients with uveitis should be frequently examined until remission is achieved. Once in remission, the interval between follow-up visits can be extended; however, it is recommended that even after remission the child should be seen every 8-12 weeks depending on the history of uveitis and the medications used. Close follow up is also necessary as uveitis can flare up during immunomodulatory therapy. It is crucial to measure the impact of uveitis, its treatment, and its complications on the child and the child's family. Visual acuity can be considered as an acceptable criterion for assessing visual function. Additionally, the number of cells in the anterior chamber can be a measure of disease activity. We review different aspects of pediatric uveitis. We discuss the mechanisms of noninfectious uveitis, including autoimmune and autoinflammatory etiologies, and the risks of developing uveitis in children with systemic rheumatologic diseases. We address the risk factors for developing morbidities, the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) criteria for timing and anatomical classifications, and describe a stepladder approach in the treatment of pediatric uveitis based on expert opinion and algorithms proposed by multi-disciplinary panels. In this review article, We describe the most common entities for each type of anatomical classification and complications of uveitis for the pediatric population. Additionally, we address monitoring of children with uveitis and evaluation of Quality of Life.
Jacobs HIL, Schoemaker D, Torrico-Teave H, Zuluaga Y, Velilla-Jimenez L, Ospina-Villegas C, Lopera F, Arboleda-Velasquez JF, Quiroz YT. Specific Abnormalities in White Matter Pathways as Interface to Small Vessels Disease and Cognition in Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy Individuals. Brain Connect 2022;12(1):52-60.Abstract
Background: Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is characterized by leukoencephalopathy leading to cognitive impairment. Subtle cognitive deficits can be observed early in the course of the disease, before the occurrence of the first stroke. Therefore, markers that can predict disease progression at this early stage, when interventions are likely to alter disease course, are needed. We aimed to examine the biological cascade of microstructural and macrostructural white matter (WM) abnormalities underlying cognitive deficits in CADASIL. Methods: We examined 20 nondemented CADASIL mutation carriers and 23 noncarriers who underwent neuropsychological evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging. Using probabilistic tractography of key WM tracts, we examined group differences in diffusivity measures and WM hyperintensity volume. Successive mediation models examined whether tract-specific WM abnormalities mediated subtle cognitive differences between CADASIL mutation carriers and noncarriers. Results: The largest effect size differentiating the two groups was observed for left superior longitudinal fasciculus-temporal (SLFt) diffusivity (Cohen's f = 0.49). No group differences were observed with a global diffusion measure. These specific microstructural differences in the SLFt were associated with higher WM hyperintensities burden, and subtle executive deficits in CADASIL mutation carriers. Discussion: Worse diffusivity in the left SLFt is related to greater severity of small vessel disease and worse executive functioning in the asymptomatic stage of the disease. Worse diffusivity of the left SLFt may potentially hold promise as an indicator of disease progression. Impact statement Diffusion tensor imaging outperforms conventional imaging of subcortical small vessel disease as a potential marker of future disease progression. Here we identified the left superior longitudinal temporal fasciculus as a critical white matter fiber bundle, of which worse diffusivity can link presence of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy mutations to greater severity of small vessel disease and worse executive functioning in asymptomatic stages of the disease. This tract may hold promise and deserves further examination as an early indicator of disease progression.
Li Y, Hall NE, Pershing S, Hyman L, Haller JA, Lee AY, Lee CS, Chiang M, Lum F, Miller JW, Lorch A, Elze T. Age, Gender, and Laterality of Retinal Vascular Occlusion: A Retrospective Study from the IRIS® Registry. Ophthalmol Retina 2022;6(2):161-171.Abstract
PURPOSE: Retinal vascular occlusion is a leading cause of profound irreversible visual loss, but the understanding of the disease is insufficient. We systematically investigated the age, gender, and laterality at the onset of retinal artery occlusion (RAO) and retinal vein occlusion (RVO) in the Intelligent Research in Sight (IRIS®) Registry. DESIGN: Retrospective registry cohort. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with retinal vascular occlusion participating in the IRIS® Registry. METHODS: Patients who received a diagnosis of retinal vascular occlusion between 2013 and 2017 were included. Those with unspecified gender or laterality were excluded when conducting the relevant analyses. Patients were categorized into RAO, with subtypes transient retinal artery occlusion (TRAO), partial retinal artery occlusion (PRAO), branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO), and central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO), and into RVO, with subtypes venous engorgement (VE), branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Age was evaluated as a categorical variable (5-year increments). We investigated the association of age, gender, and laterality with the onset frequency of retinal vascular occlusion subtypes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The frequency of onset of RAO and RVO subtypes by age, gender and laterality. RESULTS: A total of 1 251 476 patients with retinal vascular occlusion were included, 23.8% of whom had RAO, whereas 76.2% had RVO. Of these, 1 248 656 and 798 089 patients were selected for analyses relevant to gender and laterality, respectively. The onset frequency of all subtypes increased with age. PRAO, BRAO, CRAO, and CRVO presented more frequently in men (53.5%, 51.3%, 52.6%, and 50.4%, respectively), whereas TRAO, VE, and BRVO presented more frequently in women (54.9%, 56.0%, and 54.5% respectively). All RAO subtypes and BRVO showed a right-eye onset preference (TRAO, 51.7%; PRAO, 54.4%; BRAO, 53.5%; CRAO, 53.4%; and BRVO, 51.0%), whereas VE and CRVO exhibited a left-eye onset preference (53.3% and 50.9%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Although retinal vascular occlusion incidence increases with age regardless of subtypes, we found various subtype-specific disease-onset differences related to gender and, in particular, ocular laterality. These findings may improve understanding of the specific cause of retinal vascular occlusions of different subtypes and their relationships with structural and anatomic asymmetries of the vascular system.
De Arrigunaga S, Aziz K, Lorch AC, Friedman DS, Armstrong GW. A Review of Ophthalmic Telemedicine for Emergency Department Settings. Semin Ophthalmol 2022;37(1):83-90.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients presenting to emergency departments for ophthalmic emergencies benefit from prompt evaluation. However, Few emergency departments (EDs) have ophthalmologists on call, and eye care provided in EDs without ophthalmic services can be inaccurate. METHODS: We review the current state of ophthalmic telemedical care in EDs and highlight important considerations when implementing telemedicine in this setting. RESULTS: Telemedicine allows ophthalmologists to work with on-site emergency care providers to interview and examine patients remotely in EDs, enabling proper assessment of patient history, visual acuity, pupils, intraocular pressure, as well as the anterior and posterior segment. To date, patients' perceptions of this new model of care have been largely positive. DISCUSSION: The use of telemedical consultations for remote evaluation of patients with ophthalmic complaints stands to improve the quality of care provided to patients and extend the reach of remote ophthalmologists. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and the risk of in-person care further highlights the potential for telemedicine to augment existing models of emergency care.

Pages