All

Ma KK, Yuan A, Sharifi S, Pineda R. A Biomechanical Study of Flanged Intrascleral Haptic Fixation of Three-Piece Intraocular Lenses. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;227:45-52.Abstract
PURPOSE: Flanged intrascleral haptic fixation (FISHF) is a useful method for securing intraocular lenses (IOLs) in eyes without capsular support. Biomechanical studies were conducted to support the use of this technique. DESIGN: Laboratory investigation. METHODS: Haptics of 3-piece IOLs were passed through cadaveric human sclera using 30- and 27-gauge needles. Flanges were created by melting 1.0 mm from the haptic ends using cautery. The forces required to remove the flanged haptic from the sclera and disinsert the haptic from the optic were measured using a mechanical tester and a custom-fabricated mount. RESULTS: The mean FISHF dislocation force using 30-gauge needles was greatest with the CT Lucia 602 (2.04 ± 0.24 newtons [N]) compared to the LI61AO (0.93 ± 0.41 N; P = .001), ZA9003 (0.70 ± 0.34 N; P = <.001), and MA60AC (0.27 ± 0.19 N; P <.001). Using 27-gauge needles with the CT Lucia resulted in a lower dislocation force (0.56 ± 0.36 N; P <.001). The FISHF dislocation force was correlated with the flange-to-needle diameter ratio (r = 0.975). The FISHF dislocation forces of the CT Lucia and LI61AO using 30-gauge needles were not significantly different from their haptic-optic disinsertion forces (P = .79 and .27, respectively). There were no differences in flange diameters between 1.0 mm and 2.0 mm haptic melt lengths across the IOLs (P = .15-.85). CONCLUSIONS: These data strongly support the biomechanical stability of FISHF with the polyvinylidene fluoride haptics of the CT Lucia using small diameter instruments for the creation of an intrascleral tunnel. 1.0 mm of haptic may be the optimal melt length.
Gong D, Kras A, Miller JB. Application of Deep Learning for Diagnosing, Classifying, and Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Semin Ophthalmol 2021;36(4):198-204.Abstract
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects nearly 200 million people and is the third leading cause of irreversible vision loss worldwide. Deep learning, a branch of artificial intelligence that can learn image recognition based on pre-existing datasets, creates an opportunity for more accurate and efficient diagnosis, classification, and treatment of AMD on both individual and population levels. Current algorithms based on fundus photography and optical coherence tomography imaging have already achieved diagnostic accuracy levels comparable to human graders. This accuracy can be further increased when deep learning algorithms are simultaneously applied to multiple diagnostic imaging modalities. Combined with advances in telemedicine and imaging technology, deep learning can enable large populations of patients to be screened than would otherwise be possible and allow ophthalmologists to focus on seeing those patients who are in need of treatment, thus reducing the number of patients with significant visual impairment from AMD.
Pistilli M, Gangaputra SS, Pujari SS, Jabs DA, Levy-Clarke GA, Nussenblatt RB, Rosenbaum JT, Sen NH, Suhler EB, Thorne JE, Bhatt NP, Foster SC, Begum H, Fitzgerald TD, Dreger KA, Kempen JH. Contemporaneous Risk Factors for Visual Acuity in Non-Infectious Uveitis. Ocul Immunol Inflamm 2021;:1-8.Abstract
INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the associations of clinical and demographic characteristics with visual acuity (VA) with over 5 years in a subspecialty noninfectious uveitis population. METHODS: Retrospective data from 5,530 noninfectious uveitis patients were abstracted by expert reviewers, and contemporaneous associations of VA with demographic and clinical factors were modeled. RESULTS: Patients were a median of 41 years old, 65% female, and 73% white. Eyes diagnosed ≥5 years prior to cohort entry had worse VA (-1.2 lines) than those diagnosed <6 months prior, and eyes with cataract surgery performed prior to entry had worse VA (-5.9 lines) than those performed during follow-up. Vitreous haze (-4.2 lines for 3+ vs quiet), hypotony (-2.5 lines for ≤5 mm Hg vs 6-23 mm Hg), and CNV (-1.8 lines) all were strongly associated with reduced VA. CONCLUSION: Factors associated with reduced VA included well-known structural complications, and lack of subspecialty care during cataract surgery.
Sharifi S, Islam MM, Sharifi H, Islam R, Huq TN, Nilsson PH, Mollnes TE, Tran KD, Patzer C, Dohlman CH, Patra HK, Paschalis EI, Gonzalez-Andrades M, Chodosh J. Electron Beam Sterilization of Poly(Methyl Methacrylate)-Physicochemical and Biological Aspects. Macromol Biosci 2021;21(4):e2000379.Abstract
Electron beam (E-beam) irradiation is an attractive and efficient method for sterilizing clinically implantable medical devices made of natural and/or synthetic materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). As ionizing irradiation can affect the physicochemical properties of PMMA, understanding the consequences of E-beam sterilization on the intrinsic properties of PMMA is vital for clinical implementation. A detailed assessment of the chemical, optical, mechanical, morphological, and biological properties of medical-grade PMMA after E-beam sterilization at 25 and 50 kiloGray (kGy) is reported. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry studies indicate that E-beam irradiation has minimal effect on the chemical properties of the PMMA at these doses. While 25 kGy irradiation does not alter the mechanical and optical properties of the PMMA, 50 kGy reduces the flexural strength and transparency by 10% and 2%, respectively. Atomic force microscopy demonstrates that E-beam irradiation reduces the surface roughness of PMMA in a dose dependent manner. Live-Dead, AlamarBlue, immunocytochemistry, and complement activation studies show that E-beam irradiation up to 50 kGy has no adverse effect on the biocompatibility of the PMMA. These findings suggest that E-beam irradiation at 25 kGy may be a safe and efficient alternative for PMMA sterilization.
WuDunn D, Takusagawa HL, Sit AJ, Rosdahl JA, Radhakrishnan S, Hoguet A, Han Y, Chen TC. OCT Angiography for the Diagnosis of Glaucoma: A Report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2021;128(8):1222-1235.Abstract
PURPOSE: To review the current published literature on the use of OCT angiography (OCTA) to help detect changes associated with the diagnosis of primary open-angle glaucoma. METHODS: Searches of the peer-reviewed literature were conducted in March 2018, June 2018, April 2019, December 2019, and June 2020 in the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases. Abstracts of 459 articles were examined to exclude reviews and non-English articles. After inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 75 articles were selected and the panel methodologist rated them for strength of evidence. Three articles were rated level I and 57 articles were rated level II. The 15 level III articles were excluded. RESULTS: OCT angiography can detect decreased capillary vessel density within the peripapillary nerve fiber layer (level II) and macula (level I and II) in patients with suspected glaucoma, preperimetric glaucoma, and perimetric glaucoma. The degree of vessel density loss correlates significantly with glaucoma severity both overall and topographically (level II) as well as longitudinally (level I). For differentiating glaucomatous from healthy eyes, some studies found that peripapillary and macular vessel density measurements by OCTA show a diagnostic ability (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) that is comparable with structural OCT retinal nerve fiber and ganglion cell thickness measurements, whereas other studies found that structural OCT measurements perform better. Choroidal or deep-layer microvasculature dropout as measured by OCTA is also associated with glaucoma damage (level I and II). Lower peripapillary and macular vessel density and choroidal microvasculature dropout are associated with faster rates of disease progression (level I and II). CONCLUSIONS: Vessel density loss associated with glaucoma can be detected by OCTA. Peripapillary, macular, and choroidal vessel density parameters may complement visual field and structural OCT measurements in the diagnosis of glaucoma.
Leme RCP, Martins Bispo PJ, Salles MJ. Community-genotype methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections in Latin America: a systematic review. Braz J Infect Dis 2021;:101539.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Community-genotype methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CG-MRSA) emerged in the 1990s as a global community pathogen primarily involved in skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and pneumonia. To date, the CG-MRSA SSTI burden in Latin America (LA) has not been assessed. OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to report the rate and genotypes of community-genotype methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CG-MRSA) causing community-onset skin and soft tissue infections (CO-SSTIs) in LA over the last two decades. In addition, this research determined relevant data related to SSTIs due to CG-MRSA, including risk factors, other invasive diseases, and mortality. DATA SOURCES: Relevant literature was searched and extracted from five major databases: Embase, PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, and Web of Science. METHODS: A systematic review was performed, and a narrative review was constructed. RESULTS: An analysis of 11 studies identified epidemiological data across LA, with Argentina presenting the highest percentage of SSTIs caused by CG-MRSA (88%). Other countries had rates of CG-MRSA infection ranging from 0 to 51%. Brazil had one of the lowest rates of CG-MRSA SSTI (4.5-25%). In Argentina, being younger than 50 years of age and having purulent lesions were predictive factors for CG-MRSA CO-SSTIs. In addition, the predominant genetic lineages in LA belonged to sequence types 8, 30, and 5 (ST8, ST30, and ST5). CONCLUSION: There are significant regional differences in the rates of CG-MRSA causing CO-SSTIs. It is not possible to conclude whether or not CG-MRSA CO-SSTIs resulted in more severe SSTI presentations or in a higher mortality rate.
Ghaffarieh A, Ciolino JB. Potential of Application of Iron Chelating Agents in Ophthalmic Diseases. Semin Ophthalmol 2021;36(4):157-161.Abstract
The investigations discussed in this review indicate that iron may exacerbate different eye diseases. Therefore, it is plausible that reducing cellular or body iron stores could influence disease pathogenesis, so it is logical to consider the iron chelators' potential protective role in the various ophthalmic diseases in the form of topical eye drops or slow releasing injectable compounds as an adjuvant treatment.
Wu F, Goldenberg PC, Mukai S. Bilateral anterior segment dysgenesis and peripheral avascular retina with tractional retinal detachment in an infant with multiple congenital anomalies-hypotony-seizures syndrome 3. Ophthalmic Genet 2021;42(3):334-337.Abstract
Background: Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotony-seizures syndrome 3 (MCAHS3) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the PIGT gene. PIGT encodes phosphatidylinositol-glycan biosynthesis class T, which plays a crucial role in protein anchoring to cell membranes. The clinical presentation of MCAHS3 is variable in expression and severity, but can be characterized by developmental delay, seizures, hypotonia, facial dysmorphism, and other abnormalities.Materials and Methods: Case report.Results: We report unusual ocular findings including bilateral anterior segment dysgenesis, avascular retinal periphery, and tractional retinal detachment in a 1-month-old male infant with compound heterozygous PIGT mutations consistent with MCAHS3. Whole-exome sequencing did not detect any other genetic abnormalities.Conclusions: This case expands the clinical spectrum of MCAHS3 to include anomalies in ocular anterior segment and retinal vascular development. Given the rarity and the genetic heterogeneity of MCAHS3, giving rise to varied non-ocular phenotypes, it is possible that milder intraocular phenotypes could have gone unrecognized in the past.
Imamura M, Takahashi A, Matsunami M, Horikoshi M, Iwata M, Araki S-I, Toyoda M, Susarla G, Ahn J, Park KH, Kong J, Moon S, Sobrin L, and (iDRAGON) IDRGCON, Yamauchi T, Tobe K, Maegawa H, Kadowaki T, Maeda S. Genome-wide association studies identify two novel loci conferring susceptibility to diabetic retinopathy in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Hum Mol Genet 2021;30(8):716-726.Abstract
Several reports have suggested that genetic susceptibility contributes to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. We aimed to identify genetic loci that confer susceptibility to diabetic retinopathy in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. We analysed 5 790 508 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 8880 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, 4839 retinopathy cases and 4041 controls, as well as 2217 independent Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, 693 retinopathy cases and 1524 controls. The results of these two genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were combined with an inverse variance meta-analysis (Stage-1), followed by de novo genotyping for the candidate SNP loci (P < 1.0 × 10-4) in an independent case-control study (Stage-2, 2260 cases and 723 controls). After combining the association data (Stages 1 and 2) using meta-analysis, the associations of two loci reached a genome-wide significance level: rs12630354 near STT3B on chromosome 3, P = 1.62 × 10-9, odds ratio (OR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-1.23, and rs140508424 within PALM2 on chromosome 9, P = 4.19 × 10-8, OR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.36-1.91. However, the association of these two loci was not replicated in Korean, European or African American populations. Gene-based analysis using Stage-1 GWAS data identified a gene-level association of EHD3 with susceptibility to diabetic retinopathy (P = 2.17 × 10-6). In conclusion, we identified two novel SNP loci, STT3B and PALM2, and a novel gene, EHD3, that confers susceptibility to diabetic retinopathy; however, further replication studies are required to validate these associations.
Ballios BG, Pierce EA, Huckfeldt RM. Gene editing technology: Towards precision medicine in inherited retinal diseases. Semin Ophthalmol 2021;36(4):176-184.Abstract
Purpose: To review preclinical and clinical advances in gene therapy, with a focus on gene editing technologies, and application to inherited retinal disease.Methods: A narrative overview of the literature, summarizing the state-of-the-art in clinical gene therapy for inherited retinal disease, as well as the science and application of new gene editing technology.Results: The last three years has seen the first FDA approval of an in vivo gene replacement therapy for a hereditary blinding eye disease and, recently, the first clinical application of an in vivo gene editing technique. Limitations and challenges in this evolving field are highlighted, as well as new technologies developed to address the multitude of molecular mechanisms of disease.Conclusion: Genetic therapy for the treatment of inherited retinal disease is a rapidly expanding area of ophthalmology. New technologies have revolutionized the field of genome engineering and rekindled an interest in precision medicines for these conditions.
Milante RR, Guo X, Neitzel AJ, Kretz AM, Mukherjee RM, Friedman DS, Repka MX, Collins ME. Analysis of vision screening failures in a school-based vision program (2016-19). J AAPOS 2021;Abstract
BACKGROUND: Vision screenings of a school-based program were conducted in state-mandated grades (pre-kindergarten [pre-K] or kindergarten [K], 1st and 8th grade), and nonmandated grades (2nd to 7th). METHODS: During school years 2016-19, 51,593 pre-K to 8th grade students from 123 Baltimore City Public Schools underwent vision screenings, with 85% of the schools qualifying for Free and Reduced Price Meals. Assessments included distance visual acuity, Spot photoscreening, stereopsis, and cover testing. Screening failures were analyzed by grade using aggregate data. Failure rates for mandated and nonmandated grades were compared using a logistic regression model, and visual acuity distributions were analyzed using individual data. RESULTS: Over the 3-year period, 17,414 (34%) of students failed vision screening. Failure rates by grade ranged from 28% to 38%. Children in kindergarten and 3rd grade and higher were statistically more likely to fail screening than those in 1st grade. Reduced visual acuity was the most common reason for failure (91%). Failure rates were significantly higher in nonmandated grades than in state-mandated testing grades (34.7% vs 32.5% [P < 0.001]). Mean visual acuity of all students who failed vision screening was 20/50 in the worse-seeing eye and was 20/40 in the better-seeing eye. CONCLUSIONS: One-third of students failed vision screening. High screening failure rates across all grades suggest that screening in select grade levels, as currently mandated in Maryland schools, is inadequate for detecting vision problems in the low-income communities served by this program.
Ehrenberg M, Bagdonite-Bejarano L, Fulton AB, Orenstein N, Yahalom C. Genetic causes of nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia and subnormal visual acuity- other than albinism. Ophthalmic Genet 2021;42(3):243-251.Abstract
Background: To describe genetic molecular findings in individuals with congenital nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia, and subnormal vision, with normal ocular pigmentation (absence of diffuse transillumination or transparent retinal pigment typical for albinism).Methods: This is a retrospective, multicenter study of ophthalmic, systemic, and genetic features, as collected from medical records of patients diagnosed with infantile nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia. Ophthalmic findings include best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), biomicroscopic examination, cycloplegic refraction, retinal examination, macular optical coherence tomography, and electroretinography. Genetic information was retrieved from the participating genetic clinics and included ethnicity and molecular diagnosis.Results: Thirty-one individuals met the inclusion criteria and had a secure molecular diagnosis. Mutations in two genes predominated, constituting 77.4% of all the represented genes: SLC38A8 (45.1%) and PAX6 (32.3%). Seventy-eight percent of the subjects who had a measurable BCVA had moderate and severe visual impairment (range 20/80 to 20/270). Most patients with a mutation in SLC38A8 had mild to moderate astigmatism, while most patients with PAX6 mutation had moderate and severe myopia. Patients in the PAX6 group had variable degrees of anterior segment manifestations.Conclusion: In our cohort, the main causative genes for congenital nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia in normally pigmented eyes were SLC38A8 and PAX6. A mild phenotype in PAX6 mutations may be an under-diagnosed cause of nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia. Reaching an accurate genetic diagnosis is essential for both the patients and their family members. This enables predicting disease prognosis, tailoring correct follow-up, and providing genetic counseling and family planning to affected families.
Rodríguez-Valdés PJ, Rehak M, Zur D, Sala-Puigdollers A, Fraser-Bell S, Lupidi M, Chhablani J, Cebeci Z, Laíns I, Chaikitmongkol V, Fung AT, Okada M, Unterlauft JD, Smadar L, Loewenstein A, Iglicki M, Busch C. GRAding of functional and anatomical response to DExamethasone implant in patients with Diabetic Macular Edema: GRADE-DME Study. Sci Rep 2021;11(1):4738.Abstract
To analyze functional and anatomical response patterns to dexamethasone (DEX) implant in diabetic macular edema (DME), to describe proportion of responders and non-responders, and to propose a new DME grading system. Retrospective, multicenter, observational cohort study. Naïve and non-naïve DME patients were treated with DEX, with visual acuity (VA) ≥ 0.2 logMAR and central subfield thickness (CST) of ≥ 300 µm. Functional and anatomical responses were graded after 2 and 4 months, and categorized as early and stable improvement, early and progressive improvement, pendular response, delayed improvement, and persistent non-response. 417 eyes were included (175 treatment naïve eyes). Compared to non-naïve eyes, naïve eyes showed a very good functional response (VA gain ≥ 10 letters) more frequently after 2 and 4 months (56% and 57% [naïve] vs. 33% and 28% [non-naïve], p < 0.001). A VA gain < 5 letters (non-response) after 2 and 4 months was seen in 18% and 16% of naïve eyes, and in 49% and 53% of non-naïve eyes (p < 0.001). A lack of anatomical response was rare in both groups, but more frequently in non-naïve eyes (12% vs. 4%, p = 0.003). Functionally and anatomically, naïve eyes showed most frequently an early and stable improvement (functionally: 77/175 44%; anatomically: 123/175 eyes, 70%). Most non-naïve eyes experienced no significant improvement functionally (97/242 eyes, 40%), despite a mostly early and stable improvement anatomical response pattern (102/242 eyes, 42%). Functional but not anatomical response patterns were influenced by baseline VA. Naïve and non-naïve eyes show different functional and anatomical response patterns to DEX implant. Functional non-responders are rare in naïve eyes, whereas anatomical non-response is unusual in both groups.
Hong GJ, Koerner JC, Weinert MC, Stinnett SS, Freedman SF, Wallace DK, Riggins WJ, Gallaher KJ, Prakalapakorn GS. Quantitatively comparing weekly changes in retinal vascular characteristics of eyes eventually treated versus not treated for retinopathy of prematurity. J AAPOS 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To quantitatively compare retinal vascular characteristics over time in eyes eventually treated versus not treated for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), using ROPtool analysis of narrow-field retinal images. METHODS: This longitudinal study used prospectively collected narrow-field retinal images of infants screened for ROP, prior to treatment, if needed. Images were analyzed using a methodology that combines quadrant-level measures from several images of the same eye. For the longitudinal analysis, one examination per postmenstrual age (PMA) was included per eye. We compared the following ROPtool indices and their change per week between eyes eventually treated versus not treated for ROP: tortuosity index (TI), dilation index (DI), sum of adjusted indices (SAI), and tortuosity-weighted plus (TWP). Analysis was performed on three levels: eye (mean value/eye), quadrant (highest quadrant value/eye), and blood vessel (highest blood vessel value/eye). RESULTS: Of 832 examinations (99 infants), 745 images (89.5%) had 3-4 quadrants analyzable by ROPtool. On the eye level, ROPtool indices differed between eyes eventually treated versus not treated at PMA of 33-35 and 37 weeks for TI, SAI, and TWP, and at PMA of 33-34 and 37 weeks for DI (P ≤ 0.0014), and change per week differed between eyes eventually treated versus not treated only for SAI at PMA of 32 weeks (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative analysis of retinal vascular characteristics using ROPtool can help predict eventual need for treatment for ROP as early as 32 weeks PMA. ROPtool index values were more useful than change in these indices to predict eyes that would eventually need treatment for ROP.

Pages