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Rossin EJ, Tsui I, Wong SC, Hou KK, Prakhunhungsit S, Blair MP, Shapiro MJ, Leishman L, Nagiel A, Lifton JA, Quiram P, Ringeisen AL, Henderson RH, Arruti N, Buzzacco DM, Kusaka S, Ferrone PJ, Belin PJ, Chang E, Hubschman J-P, Murray TG, Leung EH, Wu W-C, Olsen KR, Harper AC, Rahmani S, Goldstein J, Lee T, Nudleman E, Cernichiaro-Espinosa LA, Chhablani J, Berrocal AM, Yonekawa Y. Traumatic Retinal Detachment in Patients with Self-Injurious Behavior: An International Multicenter Study. Ophthalmol Retina 2021;5(8):805-814.Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the clinical characteristics, surgical outcomes, and management recommendations in patients with traumatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) resulting from self-injurious behavior (SIB). DESIGN: International, multicenter, retrospective, interventional case series. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with SIB from 23 centers with RRD in at least 1 eye. METHODS: Clinical histories, preoperative assessment, surgical details, postoperative management, behavioral intervention, and follow-up examination findings were reviewed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The rate of single-surgery anatomic success (SSAS) was the primary outcome. Other outcomes included new RRD in formerly attached eyes, final retinal reattachment, and final visual acuity. RESULTS: One hundred seven eyes with RRDs were included from 78 patients. Fifty-four percent of patients had bilateral RRD or phthisis bulbi in the fellow eye at final follow-up. The most common systemic diagnoses were autism spectrum disorder (35.9%) and trisomy 21 (21.8%) and the most common behavior was face hitting (74.4%). The average follow-up time was 3.3 ± 2.8 years, and surgical outcomes for operable eyes were restricted to patients with at least 3 months of follow-up (81 eyes). Primary initial surgeries were vitrectomy alone (33.3%), primary scleral buckle (SB; 26.9%), and vitrectomy with SB (39.7%), and 5 prophylactic SBs were placed. Twenty-three eyes (21.5%) with RRDs were inoperable. The SSAS was 23.1% without tamponade (37.2% if including silicone oil), and final reattachment was attained in 80% (36.3% without silicone oil tamponade). Funnel-configured RRD (P = 0.006) and the presence of grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy (P = 0.002) correlated with re-detachment. The use of an SB predicted the final attachment rate during the initial surgery (P = 0.005) or at any surgery (P = 0.008. These associations held if restricting to 64 patients with ≥12 months followup. Anatomic reattachment correlated with better visual acuity (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: RRD resulting from SIB poses therapeutic challenges because of limited patient cooperation, bilateral involvement, chronicity, and ongoing trauma in vulnerable and neglected patients. The surgical success rates were some of the lowest in the modern retinal detachment literature. The use of an SB may result in better outcomes, and visual function can be restored in some patients.
Armstrong GW, Kim LA, Vingopoulos F, Park J, Garg I, Kasetty M, Silverman RF, Zeng R, Douglas VP, Lopera F, Baena A, Giraldo M, Norton D, Cronin-Golomb A, Arboleda-Velasquez JF, Quiroz YT, Miller JB. Retinal Imaging Findings in Carriers With PSEN1-Associated Early-Onset Familial Alzheimer Disease Before Onset of Cognitive Symptoms. JAMA Ophthalmol 2021;139(1):49-56.Abstract
Importance: Individuals with autosomal dominant mutations for Alzheimer disease are valuable in determining biomarkers present prior to the onset of cognitive decline, improving the ability to diagnose Alzheimer disease as early as possible. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has surfaced as a potential noninvasive technique capable of analyzing central nervous system tissues for biomarkers of Alzheimer disease. Objective: To evaluate whether OCT can detect early retinal alterations in carriers of the presenilin 1 (PSEN1 [OMIM 104311]) E280A mutation who are cognitively unimpaired. Design, Setting, and Participants: A cross-sectional imaging study conducted from July 13, 2015, to September 16, 2020, included 10 carriers of the PSEN1 E280A mutation who were cognitively unimpaired and 10 healthy noncarrier family members, all leveraged from a homogenous Colombian kindred. Statistical analysis was conducted from September 9, 2017, to September 16, 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mixed-effects multiple linear regression was performed to compare the thickness values of the whole retina and individual retinal layers on OCT scans between mutation carriers and noncarriers. Simple linear-effects and mixed-effects multiple linear regression models were used to assess whether age was an effect modifier for PSEN1 mutation of amyloid β levels and retinal thickness, respectively. Fundus photographs were used to compare the number of arterial and venous branch points, arterial and venous tortuosity, and fractal dimension. Results: This study included 10 carriers of the PSEN1 E280A mutation who were cognitively unimpaired (7 women [70%]; mean [SD] age, 36.3 [8.1] years) and 10 healthy noncarrier family members (7 women [70%]; mean [SD] age, 36.4 [8.2] years). Compared with noncarrier controls, PSEN1 mutation carriers who were cognitively unimpaired had a generalized decrease in thickness of the whole retina as well as individual layers detected on OCT scans, with the inner nuclear layer (outer superior quadrant, β = -3.06; P = .007; outer inferior quadrant, β = -2.60; P = .02), outer plexiform layer (outer superior quadrant, β = -3.44; P = .03), and outer nuclear layer (central quadrant, β = -8.61; P = .03; inner nasal quadrant, β = -8.39; P = .04; inner temporal quadrant, β = -9.39; P = .02) showing the greatest amount of statistically significant thinning. Age was a significant effect modifier for the association between PSEN1 mutation and amyloid β levels in cortical regions (β = 0.03; P = .001) but not for the association between PSEN1 mutation and retinal thickness. No statistical difference was detected in any of the vascular parameters studied. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that OCT can detect functional and morphologic changes in the retina of carriers of familial Alzheimer disease who are cognitively unimpaired several years before clinical onset, suggesting that OCT findings and retinal vascular parameters may be biomarkers prior to the onset of cognitive decline.
Wladis EJ, Aakalu VK, Sobel RK, McCulley TJ, Foster JA, Tao JP, Freitag SK, Yen MT. Interventions for Indirect Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2021;128(6):928-937.Abstract
PURPOSE: To review the literature on the efficacy and safety of medical and surgical interventions for indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), defined as injury to the nerve that occurs distal to the optic nerve head. METHODS: A literature search was conducted on October 22, 2019, and updated on April 8, 2020, in the PubMed database for English language original research that assessed the effect of various interventions for indirect TON. One hundred seventy-two articles were identified; 41 met the inclusion criteria outlined for assessment and were selected for full-text review and abstraction. On full-text review, a total of 32 studies met all of the study criteria and were included in the analysis. RESULTS: No study met criteria for level I evidence. Seven studies (1 level II study and 6 level III studies) explored corticosteroid therapy that did not have uniformly better outcomes than observation. Twenty studies (3 level II studies and 17 level III studies) assessed optic canal decompression and the use of corticosteroids. Although visual improvement was noted after decompression, studies that directly compared surgery with medical therapy did not report uniformly improved outcomes after decompression. Four studies (1 level II study and 3 level III studies) evaluated the use of erythropoietin. Although initial studies demonstrated benefit, a direct comparison of its use with observation and corticosteroids failed to confirm the usefulness of this medication. One study (level II) documented visual improvement with levodopa plus carbidopa. Complication rates were variable with all of these interventions. Pharmacologic interventions generally were associated with few complications, whereas optical canal decompression carried risks of serious side effects, including hemorrhages and cerebrospinal fluid leakage. CONCLUSIONS: Despite reports of visual improvement with corticosteroids, optic canal decompression, and medical therapy for indirect TON, the weight of published evidence does not demonstrate a consistent benefit for any of these interventions. In summary, no consensus exists from studies published to date on a preferred treatment for TON. Treatment strategies should be customized for each individual patient. More definitive treatment trials will be needed to identify optimal treatment strategies for indirect TON.
Han H, Yang Y, Wu Z, Liu B, Dong L, Deng H, Tian J, Lei H. Capilliposide B blocks VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Biomed Pharmacother 2021;133:110999.Abstract
Abnormal angiogenesis is associated with intraocular diseases such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration, and current therapies for these eye diseases are not satisfactory. The purpose of this study was to determine whether capilliposide B (CPS-B), a novel oleanane triterpenoid saponin derived from Lysimachia capillipes Hemsl, can inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis signaling events and cellular responses in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs). Our study revealed that the capilliposide B IC for HRECs was 8.5 μM at 72 h and that 1 μM capilliposide B specifically inhibited VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling enzymes Akt and Erk. In addition, we discovered that this chemical effectively blocked VEGF-stimulated proliferation, migration and tube formation of the HRECs, suggesting that capilliposide B is a promising prophylactic for angiogenesis-associated diseases such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
Ma KK, Luo ZK. Novel Method to Determine Target Refraction in Cataract Surgery for Patients Dependent on Therapeutic Scleral Lenses. Eye Contact Lens 2021;47(6):352-355.Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate a novel approach to determine the refractive target for patients undergoing cataract surgery who are dependent on therapeutic scleral lenses, to avoid the need for postoperative scleral lens replacement. METHODS: Retrospective single-surgeon case series. The target refraction for intraocular lens selection was determined by considering the effective scleral lens system power. This was calculated by adding the known scleral lens spherical power to the difference between the scleral lens base curve and the average keratometry value. RESULTS: Six eyes from three patients with moderate myopia or emmetropia with ocular graft versus host disease dependent on therapeutic scleral lenses underwent cataract surgery with intraocular lens selection based on this method. All six eyes had corrected visual acuities of 20/30 or better while wearing their previous scleral lenses at the postoperative week 1 visit. All six eyes resumed full-time scleral lens use 1 week after phacoemulsification and did not require scleral lens replacement. CONCLUSIONS: Using this method, patients requiring therapeutic scleral lenses can quickly experience optimal vision, comfort, and ocular surface protection 1 week after cataract surgery. These patients can continue to use their existing scleral lenses and avoid the costs and burdens associated with lens replacement.
Waldman AT, Benson L, Sollee JR, Lavery AM, Liu GW, Green AJ, Waubant E, Heidary G, Conger D, Graves J, Greenberg B. Interocular Difference in Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Predicts Optic Neuritis in Pediatric-Onset Multiple Sclerosis. J Neuroophthalmol 2021;41(4):469-475.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of quantifying retinal damage. Defining the extent of anterior visual pathway injury is important in multiple sclerosis (MS) as a way to document evidence of prior disease, including subclinical injury, and setting a baseline for patients early in the course of disease. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness is typically classified as low if values fall outside of a predefined range for a healthy population. In adults, an interocular difference (IOD) in RNFL thickness greater than 5 μm identified a history of unilateral optic neuritis (ON). Through our PERCEPTION (PEdiatric Research Collaboration ExPloring Tests in Ocular Neuroimmunology) study, we explored whether RNFL IOD informs on remote ON in a multicenter pediatric-onset MS (POMS) cohort. METHODS: POMS (defined using consensus criteria and first attack <18 years) patients were recruited from 4 academic centers. A clinical history of ON (>6 months prior to an OCT scan) was confirmed by medical record review. RNFL thickness was measured on Spectralis machines (Heidelberg, Germany). Using a cohort of healthy controls from our centers tested on the same machines, RNFL thickness <86 μm (<2 SDs below the mean) was defined as abnormal. Based on previously published findings in adults, an RNFL IOD >5 μm was defined as abnormal. The proportions of POMS participants with RNFL thinning (<86 μm) and abnormal IOD (>5 μm) were calculated. Logistic regression was used to determine whether IOD was associated with remote ON. RESULTS: A total of 157 participants with POMS (mean age 15.2 years, SD 3.2; 67 [43%] with remote ON) were enrolled. RNFL thinning occurred in 45 of 90 (50%) ON eyes and 24 of 224 (11%) non-ON eyes. An IOD >5 μm was associated with a history of remote ON (P < 0.001). An IOD >5 μm occurred in 62 participants, 40 (65%) with remote ON. Among 33 participants with remote ON but normal RNFL values (≥86 μm in both eyes), 14 (42%) were confirmed to have ON by IOD criteria (>5 μm). CONCLUSIONS: In POMS, the diagnostic yield of OCT in confirming remote ON is enhanced by considering RNFL IOD, especially for those patients with RNFL thickness for each eye in the normal range. An IOD >5 μm in patients with previous visual symptoms suggests a history of remote ON.
Kalra G, Ichhpujani P, Thakur S, Singh RB, Sharma U, Kumar S. A pilot study for smartphone photography to assess bleb morphology and vasculature post-trabeculectomy. Int Ophthalmol 2021;41(2):483-490.Abstract
PURPOSE: The current grading systems used for bleb morphology assessment in patients post-trabeculectomy are based on standardized slit-lamp photographs and anterior segment imaging devices. The lack of availability of these expensive and non-portable devices in resource-deficient settings is a significant deterrent in their widespread utilization for proper post-operative management. The rapidly evolving utilization of smartphone photography has significantly benefited diagnostics of posterior segment disorders and is now being increasingly utilized for monitoring anterior segment pathologies as well as post-surgical course. In this study, we study a novel use of smartphones for bleb photography for assessing the morphological characteristics as vascularity and microcysts. METHODS: In this pilot, observational study, we compared the trabeculectomy bleb images of five subjects, obtained by iPhone X (dual lens) and iPhone 6S (single lens). We captured two image sets with both smartphones first with a focussed torchlight and then with a built-in flash video light. RESULTS: The images resulting from the newer iPhone X were substantially superior than those from iPhone 6S. For the 12-megapixel dual-camera set-up on the iPhone X, the 1 × lens resulted in better images than the 2 × lens with contrast and overall clarity of the area of interest. While the macro-lens attachment had promising results at 1 × zoom, there is no added advantage of the macro-lens attachment as it resulted in considerable loss of image quality at twice the zoom. Using a 20 D lens helped attain higher magnification and better framing as it reduced the focussing distance needed to get sharp images. The images obtained from both smartphones were of higher quality when illuminated from an external source when compared to the native iPhone flash due to even exposure and fewer autofocus artefacts. CONCLUSION: Analyses of all image sets showed that the current generation in-built camera app on IOS and newer iPhone camera optics resulted in high-quality images of the ocular surface with high magnification without any loss in clarity.
Thulasi P, Saeed HN, Rapuano CJ, Hou JH, Appenheimer AB, Chodosh J, Kang JJ, Morrill AM, Vyas N, Zegans ME, Zuckerman R, Tu EY. Oral Miltefosine as Salvage Therapy for Refractory Acanthamoeba Keratitis. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;223:75-82.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report a case series of patients with treatment-resistant Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) using oral miltefosine, often as salvage therapy. DESIGN: Descriptive, retrospective multicenter case series. METHODS: We reviewed 15 patients with AK unresponsive to therapy who were subsequently given adjuvant systemic miltefosine between 2011 and 2017. The main outcome measures were resolution of infection, final visual acuity, tolerance of miltefosine, and clinical course of disease. RESULTS: All patients were treated with biguanides and/or diamidines or azoles without resolution of disease before starting miltefosine. Eleven of 15 patients retained count fingers or better vision, and all were considered disease free at last follow-up. Eleven of 15 patients had worsening inflammation with miltefosine, with 10 of them improving with steroids. Six patients received multiple courses of miltefosine. Most tolerated oral miltefosine well, with mild gastrointestinal symptoms as the most common systemic side effect. CONCLUSIONS: Oral miltefosine is a generally well-tolerated treatment adjuvant in patients with refractory AK. The clinician should be prepared for a steroid-responsive inflammatory response frequently encountered during the treatment course.
Wendt S, Abdullah Z, Barrett S, Daruwalla C, Go JA, Le B, Li E, Livingston C, Miller M, Nakhleh L, Pecha J, Pothula S, Pradhan S, Sathappan V, Shah A, Sonuyi A-M, Ugoh P, Wang Q, Weber N, Succar T, Blieden L, Mortensen P, Elkin Z, Sun G, Lee AG. A virtual COVID-19 ophthalmology rotation. Surv Ophthalmol 2021;66(2):354-361.Abstract
The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic temporarily suspended medical student involvement in clinical rotations, resulting in the need to develop virtual clinical experiences. The cancellation of clinical ophthalmology electives and away rotations reduces opportunities for exposure to the field, to network with faculty, conduct research, and prepare for residency applications. We review the literature and discuss the impact and consequences of COVID-19 on undergraduate medical education with an emphasis on ophthalmic undergraduate medical education. We also discuss innovative learning modalities used from medical schools around the world during the COVID-19 pandemic such as virtual didactics, online cases, and telehealth. Finally, we describe a novel, virtual neuro-ophthalmology elective created to educate medical students on neuro-ophthalmology foundational principles, provide research and presentation opportunities, and build relationships with faculty members. These innovative approaches represent a step forward in further improving medical education in ophthalmology during COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.
Latifi G, Banafshe Afshan A, Houshang Beheshtnejad A, Zarei-Ghanavati M, Mohammadi N, Ghaffari R, Ghassemi H, Mohammadi SS, Kheirkhah A. Changes in Corneal Subbasal Nerves after Punctal Occlusion in Dry Eye Disease. Curr Eye Res 2021;46(6):777-783.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate corneal subbasal nerve plexus by in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) following punctal occlusion in patients with moderate to severe dry eye disease (DED). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with grade 3 or 4 severity of DED based on Delphi Panel dry eye severity grading scheme were enrolled in the study. Permanent inferior punctal occlusion was performed. A comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation, including Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, tear break-up time (TBUT), corneal fluorescein staining, conjunctival Rose bengal staining, Schirmer's test, and corneal sensation by Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometry, were performed at baseline, and 1 and 3 months after punctal occlusion. Furthermore, density and number of corneal subbasal nerves were evaluated by IVCM. RESULTS: Forty-one eyes of 23 patients with a mean age of 46.3 ± 9.0 years were enrolled. Corneal fluorescein staining, Rose bengal staining, and TBUT significantly improved at 3 months following punctal occlusion (p < .015). Corneal esthesiometry significantly increased at both postoperative visits (p < .03), and OSDI scores improved only at 3-month follow-up (p < .005). Nerve density and total number significantly increased 3 months after punctal occlusion (p < .045). Baseline nerve density had significant correlations with TBUT, fluorescein staining, Rose bengal staining (p < .012), but not with esthesiometry, Schirmer scores, or OSDI scores (p > .329). CONCLUSIONS: Corneal subbasal nerve density and total number increased following punctal occlusion in patients with moderate to severe DED. These findings were associated with improvements in corneal sensation, and signs and symptoms of DED. This emphasizes the effect of punctal occlusion in regeneration of corneal subbasal nerve plexus.
Kumar V, Ali Shariati M, Mesentier-Louro L, Jinsook Oh A, Russano K, Goldberg JL, Liao YJ. Dual Specific Phosphatase 14 Deletion Rescues Retinal Ganglion Cells and Optic Nerve Axons after Experimental Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy. Curr Eye Res 2021;46(5):710-718.Abstract
PURPOSE: Understanding molecular changes is essential for designing effective treatments for nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), the most common acute optic neuropathy in adults older than 50 years. We investigated changes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway after experimental AION and focused on dual specificity phosphatase 14 (Dusp14), an atypical MAPK phosphatase that is downstream of Krüppel-like transcription factor (KLF) 9-mediated inhibition of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal regeneration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We induced severe AION in a photochemical thrombosis model in adult C57BL/6 wild-type and Dusp14 knockout mice. For comparison, some studies were performed using an optic nerve crush model. We assessed changes in MAPK pathway molecules using Western blot and immunohistochemistry, measured retinal thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and quantified RGCs and axons using histologic methods. RESULTS: Three days after severe AION, there was no change in the retinal protein levels of MAPK ERK1/2, phosphorylated-ERK1/2 (pERK1/2), downstream effector Elk-1 and phosphatase Dusp14 on Western blot. Western blot analysis of purified RGCs after a more severe model using optic nerve crush also showed no change in Dusp14 protein expression. Because of the known importance of the Dusp14 and MAPK pathway in RGCs, we examined changes after AION in Dusp14 knockout mice. Three days after AION, Dusp14 knockout mice had significantly increased pERK1/2+, Brn3A+ RGCs on immunohistochemistry. Three weeks after AION, Dusp14 knockout mice had significantly greater preservation of retinal thickness, increased number of Brn3A+ RGCs on whole mount preparation, and increased number of optic nerve axons compared with wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic deletion of Dusp14, a MAPK phosphatase important in KFL9-mediated inhibition of RGC survival, led to increased activation of MAPK ERK1/2 and greater RGC and axonal survival after experimental AION. Inhibiting Dusp14 or activating the MAPK pathway should be examined further as a potential therapeutic approach to treatment of AION. Abbreviations: AION: anterior ischemic optic neuropathy; Dusp14: dual specific phosphatase 14; ERK1/2: extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2; Elk-1: ETS Like-1 protein; GCC: ganglion cell complex; GCL: ganglion cell layer; inner nuclear layer; KO: knockout; MAPK: mitogen-activated phosphokinase; OCT: optical coherence tomography; RGC: retinal ganglion cell; RNFL: retinal nerve fiber layer.
Solaguren-Beascoa M, Bujakowska KM, Méjécase C, Emmenegger L, Orhan E, Neuillé M, Mohand-Saïd S, Condroyer C, Lancelot M-E, Michiels C, Demontant V, Antonio A, Letexier M, Saraiva J-P, Lonjou C, Carpentier W, Léveillard T, Pierce EA, Dollfus H, Sahel J-A, Bhattacharya SS, Audo I, Zeitz C. WDR34, a candidate gene for non-syndromic rod-cone dystrophy. Clin Genet 2021;99(2):298-302.Abstract
Rod-cone dystrophy (RCD), also called retinitis pigmentosa, is characterized by rod followed by cone photoreceptor degeneration, leading to gradual visual loss. Mutations in over 65 genes have been associated with non-syndromic RCD explaining 60% to 70% of cases, with novel gene defects possibly accounting for the unsolved cases. Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing applied to a case of autosomal recessive non-syndromic RCD from a consanguineous union identified a homozygous variant in WDR34. Mutations in WDR34 have been previously associated with severe ciliopathy syndromes possibly associated with a retinal dystrophy. This is the first report of a homozygous mutation in WDR34 associated with non-syndromic RCD.

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