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Gaier ED, Gise R, Heidary G. Imaging Amblyopia: Insights from Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Semin Ophthalmol 2019;:1-9.Abstract
Amblyopia refers to visual impairment resulting from perturbations in visual experience during visual development, typically secondary to strabismus, uncorrected refractive error, and/or deprivation. Amblyopia has traditionally been considered a cortical disease, but the depth of our understanding of this complex neurodevelopmental condition is limited by our ability to appreciate structural pathophysiology in the visual pathway. Recent advances in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) have facilitated numerous studies of the structural changes in the retina and optic nerve, thereby expanding our appreciation for the pathogenesis of this condition. In this review, we summarize findings from studies evaluating retinal, retinal nerve fiber layer, and choroidal thickness changes in patients with amblyopia. Focusing on the largest and most recent studies, we discuss common limitations and confounding variables in these studies. We summarize recent advances in ocular imaging technology and reconcile the findings of early histological reports with those of structural OCT in amblyopia.
Escuder AG, Hunter DG. The Role of Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of Strabismus. Semin Ophthalmol 2019;:1-7.Abstract
: To perform a systematic review of the application of botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the management of strabismus in the adult and pediatric populations. : A systematic literature search was performed using the Medline database. : In 1989, with the FDA approval of botulinum toxin (onabotulinum toxin A, or BTA) for the treatment of strabismus, patients were provided with an alternative to surgical recession. In this review, we discuss the uses of BTA in the treatment of acute onset comitant esotropia or smaller angle esotropia and as an adjunct to surgery for larger angle esotropia or sixth nerve palsy. Its uses are also explored in intermittent exotropia and vertical strabismus, including thyroid-associated orbitopathy, fourth nerve palsies, and other orbital pathology. : Despite its transient kinetics, BTA can have permanent effects on ocular alignment, promoting binocularity and reduction of diplopia, and can serve as a primary treatment or a muscle sparing option in patients at risk of anterior segment ischemia or need for future surgeries.
AbdelAl O, Ashraf M, Sampani K, Sun JK. "For Mass Eye and Ear Special Issue" Adaptive Optics in the Evaluation of Diabetic Retinopathy. Semin Ophthalmol 2019;:1-9.Abstract
Retinal imaging is a fundamental tool for clinical and research efforts in the evaluation and management of diabetic retinopathy. Adaptive optics (AO) is an imaging technique that enables correction of over 90% of the optical aberrations of an individual eye induced primarily by the tear film, cornea and lens. The two major tasks of any AO system are to measure the optical imperfections of the eye and to then compensate for these aberrations to generate a corrected wavefront of reflected light from the eye. AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) provides a theoretical lateral resolution limit of 1.4 μm, allowing the study of microscopic features of the retinal vascular and neural tissue. AOSLO studies have revealed irregularities of the photoreceptor mosaic, vascular loss, and details of vascular lesions in diabetic eyes that may provide new insight into development, regression, and response to therapy of diabetic eye disease.
Perepelkina T, Kegeles E, Baranov PY. Optimized conditions and use of synthetic matrix for retinal differentiation from pluripotent cells. Tissue Eng Part C Methods 2019;Abstract
PURPOSE: Since it was first introduced in 2011, three-dimensional "Sasai" method for retinal differentiation became a strategy of choice for retinal tissue and neuron production. It is based on the recapitulation of retinal development and requires several stages: aggregate formation, neuroectoderm induction, and eye field induction, followed by retinal maturation. In order to achieve the consistency of retinal differentiation needed for drug discovery and cell transplantation we have attempted to improve spheroid formation as well as approach xeno-free conditions. METHODS: In this study we compared the effect of cell culture plate shape and material, medium viscosity, lipid and bovine serum albumin concentrations on aggregate formation from mouse embryonic stem cells. We have also assessed the possibility of substituting Matrigel with the synthetic vitronectin-mimicking oligopeptide. RX-GFP mES cell line used for experiments. The dose-response of synthetic ECM has been assessed and quantified by live fluorescence microscopy, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and qPCR for early retinal development genes (Rx, Pax6, Lhx2, Sox2, Six6). RESULTS: The comparison of seeding conditions at 24hr. post seeding showed the dose-dependent effects of lipids (lipids concentration of 2% resulted in 100% efficiency of aggregate formation and significant increase in size to 532.8 ± 31.87um, p< 0.05); and viscosity (methylcellulose concentration of 0.06% in OV medium showed 100% efficiency and increase in aggregate size 532±19.23 um, p<0.01). The addition of synthetic matrix resulted in retinal differentiation (34.47% of RX as detected by flow cytometry compared to 33.8%, observed with Matrigel). The early retinal genes expression at day 7 was confirmed by qPCR. CONCLUSIONS: We present the optimized conditions for 3D retinal differentiation including the option of xeno-free extracellular matrix. These defined medium conditions significantly decrease the variability within and between batches and allow substantial scale up of retinal tissue and cell production for drug discovery, disease modeling and transplantation purposes.
An D, Fujiki R, Iannitelli DE, Smerdon JW, Maity S, Rose MF, Gelber A, Wanaselja EK, Yagudayeva I, Lee JY, Vogel C, Wichterle H, Engle EC, Mazzoni EO. Stem cell-derived cranial and spinal motor neurons reveal proteostatic differences between ALS resistant and sensitive motor neurons. Elife 2019;8Abstract
In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) spinal motor neurons (SpMN) progressively degenerate while a subset of cranial motor neurons (CrMN) are spared until late stages of the disease. Using a rapid and efficient protocol to differentiate mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) to SpMNs and CrMNs, we now report that ESC-derived CrMNs accumulate less human (h)SOD1 and insoluble p62 than SpMNs over time. ESC-derived CrMNs have higher proteasome activity to degrade misfolded proteins and are intrinsically more resistant to chemically-induced proteostatic stress than SpMNs. Chemical and genetic activation of the proteasome rescues SpMN sensitivity to proteostatic stress. In agreement, the hSOD1 G93A mouse model reveals that ALS-resistant CrMNs accumulate less insoluble hSOD1 and p62-containing inclusions than SpMNs. Primary-derived ALS-resistant CrMNs are also more resistant than SpMNs to proteostatic stress. Thus, an ESC-based platform has identified a superior capacity to maintain a healthy proteome as a possible mechanism to resist ALS-induced neurodegeneration.
Yizhak K, Aguet F, Kim J, Hess JM, Kübler K, Grimsby J, Frazer R, Zhang H, Haradhvala NJ, Rosebrock D, Livitz D, Li X, Arich-Landkof E, Shoresh N, Stewart C, Segrè AV, Branton PA, Polak P, Ardlie KG, Getz G. RNA sequence analysis reveals macroscopic somatic clonal expansion across normal tissues. Science 2019;364(6444)Abstract
How somatic mutations accumulate in normal cells is poorly understood. A comprehensive analysis of RNA sequencing data from ~6700 samples across 29 normal tissues revealed multiple somatic variants, demonstrating that macroscopic clones can be found in many normal tissues. We found that sun-exposed skin, esophagus, and lung have a higher mutation burden than other tested tissues, which suggests that environmental factors can promote somatic mosaicism. Mutation burden was associated with both age and tissue-specific cell proliferation rate, highlighting that mutations accumulate over both time and number of cell divisions. Finally, normal tissues were found to harbor mutations in known cancer genes and hotspots. This study provides a broad view of macroscopic clonal expansion in human tissues, thus serving as a foundation for associating clonal expansion with environmental factors, aging, and risk of disease.
McHugh KJ, Li D, Wang JC, Kwark L, Loo J, Macha V, Farsiu S, Kim LA, Saint-Geniez M. Computational modeling of retinal hypoxia and photoreceptor degeneration in patients with age-related macular degeneration. PLoS One 2019;14(6):e0216215.Abstract
Although drusen have long been acknowledged as a primary hallmark of dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) their role in the disease remains unclear. We hypothesize that drusen accumulation increases the barrier to metabolite transport ultimately resulting in photoreceptor cell death. To investigate this hypothesis, a computational model was developed to evaluate steady-state oxygen distribution in the retina. Optical coherence tomography images from fifteen AMD patients and six control subjects were segmented and translated into 3D in silico representations of retinal morphology. A finite element model was then used to determine the steady-state oxygen distribution throughout the retina for both generic and patient-specific retinal morphology. Oxygen levels were compared to the change in retinal thickness at a later time point to observe possible correlations. The generic finite element model of oxygen concentration in the retina agreed closely with both experimental measurements from literature and clinical observations, including the minimal pathological drusen size identified by AREDS (64 μm). Modeling oxygen distribution in the outer retina of AMD patients showed a substantially stronger correlation between hypoxia and future retinal thinning (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.2162) than between drusen height and retinal thinning (r = 0.0303) indicating the potential value of this physiology-based approach. This study presents proof-of-concept for the potential utility of finite element modeling in evaluating retinal health and also suggests a potential link between transport and AMD pathogenesis. This strategy may prove useful as a prognostic tool for predicting the clinical risk of AMD progression.
Drack AV, Utz VM, Wang K, Alcorn DM, Brooks BP, Costakos DM, Couser NL, Heon E, Levin AV, Lloyd CI, Morse CL, Schmitt MA, Whitman MC, Traboulsi EI. Survey of practice patterns for the management of ophthalmic genetic disorders among AAPOS members: report by the AAPOS Genetic Eye Disease Task Force. J AAPOS 2019;Abstract
To better understand AAPOS member pediatric ophthalmologists' knowledge and needs regarding genetic eye disorders, the AAPOS Genetic Eye Disease Task Force developed a 16-question survey that was circulated to national and international AAPOS members. Responses to questions on practice patterns, baseline knowledge, and educational interests regarding patients with suspected ophthalmic genetic disorders were collected. A majority of respondents (93%) evaluate patients with suspected genetic disorders. Knowledge gaps were present in heritability of certain conditions, genetic testing strategies, and referral to clinical trials. Most respondents expressed interest in further education in these areas. A model for care is proposed as a first step in the education process.
Nguyen JQN, Resnick CM, Chang Y-H, Hansen RM, Fulton AB, Moskowitz A, Calabrese CE, Dagi LR. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea on optic nerve function in patients with craniosynostosis and recurrent intracranial hypertension. Am J Ophthalmol 2019;Abstract
PURPOSE: Assessment of combined impact of intracranial pressure (ICH) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on optic nerve function in children with craniosynostosis (CS). DESIGN: Retrospective cross-sectional study METHODS: Patients treated at Boston Children's Hospital for CS who had an ophthalmic examination that included pattern reversal (pr)VEP (2013-2014) and history of ICH based on direct measurement, papilledema, or classic features on neuroimaging and during cranial vault expansion were included. History of OSA was determined by polysomnography and associated conditions, including apnea and (adeno)tonsillectomy. Subjects were divided into four groups: (1) resolved ICH absent history of OSA; (2) resolved ICH with history of OSA; (3) recurrent ICH absent history of OSA; and (4) recurrent ICH with history of OSA. Predictor variables included latency of P100 component of prVEP, best-corrected visual acuity, optic nerve appearance, visual fields and global RNFL. Primary outcome was association of prolonged P100 latency with resolved versus recurrent ICH and OSA. RESULTS: Twenty-eight children met inclusion criteria (mean age 11.6 ± 6.9 years): group 1 (N = 3); group 2 (N = 6); group 3 (N = 8); group 4 (N = 11). P100 latencies were not prolonged in groups 1 and 2. Three of 8 in group 3 and 9 of 11 in group 4 had prolonged P100 latency. Group 4 was significantly worse than group 3 (P=0.005). CONCLUSIONS: History of OSA, in addition to recurrent ICH, is associated with greatest risk of optic neuropathy with CS. Ophthalmologists should encourage early management of OSA as well as ICH to optimize ophthalmic outcomes.
Bressler NM, Odia I, Maguire M, Glassman AR, Jampol LM, MacCumber MW, Shah C, Rosberger D, Sun JK, Sun JK. Association Between Change in Visual Acuity and Change in Central Subfield Thickness During Treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema in Participants Randomized to Aflibercept, Bevacizumab, or Ranibizumab: A Post Hoc Analysis of the Protocol T Randomized Clinic. JAMA Ophthalmol 2019;Abstract
Importance: The determination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) central subfield thickness (CST) is an objective measure, and visual acuity (VA) is a subjective measure. Therefore, using OCT CST changes as a surrogate for VA changes in diabetic macular edema seems reasonable. However, studies suggest that change in OCT CST following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment for diabetic macular edema is correlated with changes in VA but varies substantially among individuals, and so may not be a good surrogate for changes in VA. Objective: To determine associations between changes in VA and changes in OCT CST across 3 anti-VEGF agents (aflibercept, bevacizumab, or ranibizumab) used in a randomized clinical trial for diabetic macular edema. Design, Setting, and Participants: Post hoc analyses were conducted of DRCR Retina Network Protocol T among 652 of 660 participants (98.8%) meeting inclusion criteria for this investigation. The study was conducted between August 22, 2012, and September 23, 2015. The post hoc data collection and analysis were performed from May 29 to July 11, 2018. Interventions: Six monthly intravitreous anti-VEGF injections (unless success was achieved after 3-5 months) were administered; subsequent injections or focal/grid laser photocoagulation treatments were given as needed per protocol to achieve stability. Main Outcomes and Measures: Association between changes in VA letter score with changes in CST at 12, 52, and 104 weeks after randomization to aflibercept, bevacizumab, or ranibizumab. Results: Of the 652 participants, 304 were women (46.6%); median age was 61 years (interquartile range, 54-67 years). The correlation between CST and VA at the follow-up visits was 0.24 (95% CI, 0.16-0.31) in 616 patients at 12 weeks, 0.31 (95% CI, 0.24-0.38) in 609 patients at 52 weeks, and 0.23 (95% CI, 0.15-0.31) in 566 patients at 104 weeks. The correlation coefficients of change in VA vs change in OCT CST for these time intervals were 0.36 (95% CI, 0.29-0.43) at 12 weeks, 0.36 (95% CI, 0.29-0.43) at 52 weeks, and 0.33 (95% CI, 0.26-0.41) at 104 weeks. Conclusions and Relevance: Changes in CST appear to account for only a small proportion of the total variation in changes in VA. These findings do not support using changes in OCT CST as a surrogate for changes in VA in phase 3 clinical trials evaluating anti-VEGF for diabetic macular edema or as a guide to inform the physician or patient about changes in VA after anti-VEGF treatment. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01627249.
Siddiqui Y, Yin J. Anterior Segment Applications of Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography. Semin Ophthalmol 2019;:1-6.Abstract
: To review the current literature regarding optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) applications in the anterior segment. : A literature search was performed for terms including OCT-Angiography, anterior segment, cornea, conjunctiva, iris, applications and use in ophthalmology. : Fifteen studies were identified, 14 in human subjects. Studies with OCT-A of the conjunctiva, episclera, cornea, and iris were identified, some with normal eyes imaged and others with various pathologies. Most of these studies imaged corneal neovascularization. Three studies described protocols used for image acquisition, one of which was referenced by two later papers. : OCT-A is a noninvasive technology with recent applications in the anterior segment. Several pilot studies have been performed on various anterior segment structures and disease states however standardization of image acquisition techniques is still needed. Future imaging could allow noninvasive and serial monitoring of pathology as well as recurrence after therapeutic intervention.
Cohen LM, Shaye DA, Yoon MK. Isolated Orbital Floor Fracture Management: A Survey and Comparison of American Oculofacial and Facial Plastic Surgeon Preferences. Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr 2019;12(2):112-121.Abstract
This article aimed to characterize, compare, and contrast the management of isolated orbital floor fractures among oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons in the United States. An anonymous 17-question multiple-choice web-based survey was distributed to all 590 members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) and all 1,300 members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) using each society's email database from November 2016 to January 2017. Two-hundred twenty-five oculofacial and 135 facial plastic surgeons completed the survey. The most important indications for surgery among both oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons were motility restriction, enophthalmos, and diplopia at 2 weeks. The most common preferred time to surgical intervention was 8 to 14 days; however, facial plastic surgeons were more likely to operate after 4 to 7 days (  < 0.001). The most common choices of orbital implant material were porous polyethylene and porous polyethylene plus titanium for both oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons, nylon for oculofacial surgeons, and titanium for facial plastic surgeons. The majority rarely/never used intraoperative computed tomography imaging or navigation. Facial plastic surgeons were more likely to perform postoperative imaging (  < 0.001). We report results of the first survey of isolated orbital floor fracture management among oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons in the United States. This survey characterizes practice patterns and areas of similarities/differences among oculofacial and facial plastic surgeons in the management of isolated orbital floor fractures, which may help define the current standard of care.
Khoueir Z, Jassim F, Braaf B, Poon LY-C, Tsikata E, Chodosh J, Dohlman CH, Vakoc BJ, Bouma BE, de Boer JF, Chen TC. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging For Glaucoma Associated With Boston Keratoprosthesis Type I and II. J Glaucoma 2019;28(8):718-726.Abstract
PRECIS: Three-dimensional (3D) spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volume scans of the optic nerve head (ONH) and the peripapillary area are useful in the management of glaucoma in patients with a type I or II Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro). PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to report the use of spectral domain OCT in the management of glaucoma in patients with a type I or II Boston KPro. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study is an observational case series. Four consecutive patients with KPro implants were referred for glaucoma evaluation. A comprehensive eye examination was performed which included disc photography, visual field testing, and high-density spectral domain OCT volume scans of the ONH and the peripapillary area. 2D and 3D parameters were calculated using custom-designed segmentation algorithms developed for glaucoma management. RESULTS: Spectral domain OCT parameters provided useful information in the diagnosis and management of 4 KPro patients. OCT parameters which can be used in KPro patients included 2D retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, 3D peripapillary RNFL volume, 3D peripapillary retinal thickness and volume, 3D cup volume, and 3D neuroretinal rim thickness and volume. In 3 of 4 cases where the traditional 2D RNFL thickness scan was limited by artifacts, 3D spectral domain OCT volume scans provided useful quantitative objective measurements of the ONH and peripapillary region. Therefore, 3D parameters derived from high-density volume scans as well as radial scans of the ONH can be used to overcome the limitations and artifacts associated with 2D RNFL thickness scans. CONCLUSIONS: Spectral domain OCT volume scans offer the possibility to enhance the evaluation of KPro patients with glaucoma by using both 2D and 3D diagnostic parameters that are easily obtained in a clinic setting.

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