Ephraim Friedman, MD

Ephraim Friedman, MD

(January 1, 1930 - June 18, 2011)
President of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, 1983-1990
Ephraim Friedman, MD

BIOGRAPHY Dr. Ephraim Friedman, ophthalmologist and past President of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, passed away on June 18, 2011. He was a friend to many within the Harvard Ophthalmology community, a loving family man, skilled clinician and retinal surgeon, sculptor, educator, researcher, and administrator.

Dr. Friedman was drawn to ophthalmology while serving as a captain in the Air Force, and completed his residency at Harvard Medical School/Mass. Eye and Ear under Dr. David Cogan in 1961. For the next four years, he was a research fellow at the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology at Mass. Eye and Ear. The author of 36 scholarly articles focusing on circulation in the eye, Dr. Friedman developed the vascular model for the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. He served as Dean of the Boston University Medical School (1970-1974) and Dean of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (1974-1983) before returning to the Mass. Eye and Ear as President (1983-1990). A life-long sculptor, Dr. Friedman retired from administration in 1990 to spend more time with his art, family, research, and the log home he built in Maine.

In 2006, a gift from Friedman Family Foundation initiated the Ephraim Friedman Lecture in honor of Dr. Friedman’s extraordinary teaching, research, and service to the field of ophthalmology and AMD. On the occasion of his 80th birthday in 2011, another family legacy gift was established: the Solman and Libe Friedman Professorship in Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. Named for Dr. Friedman’s parents, the professorship was made possible through a very generous gift from the Friedman Family Foundation with contributions from additional donors and the Foundation of Mass. Eye and Ear Infirmary. “Generations of HMS ophthalmology faculty and trainees will benefit from these gifts as they endure through the 21st century and beyond,” said Dr. Miller. “They commemorate dedication to learning that is a Friedman family hallmark, and create a lasting tribute to a man who gave so much to our institution, our profession and our patients.”

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