Vascular Abnormalities in Uveitis

Citation:

Ebrahimiadib N, Maleki A, Fadakar K, Manhapra A, Ghassemi F, Foster SC. Vascular Abnormalities in Uveitis. Surv Ophthalmol 2021;

Date Published:

2021 Jan 04

Abstract:

Inflammation can involve several ocular structures, including the sclera, retina, uvea, and cause vascular changes in these tissues. Although retinal vasculitis is the most common finding associated with uveitis involving the posterior segment, other vascular abnormalities may be seen in the retina. These include capillary non perfusion and ischemia, vascular occlusions, pre-retinal neovascularization, micro- and macro-aneurysms, and telangiectasia. Moreover, vasoproliferative tumors and subsequent Coat-like response can develop secondary to uveitis. Fluorescein angiography is ideal for the investigation of retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, while optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) can provide depth resolved images from the superficial and deep capillary plexus and can demonstrate vascular remodeling. Choroidal vascular abnormalities primarily develop in the choriocapillaris or in the choroidal stroma, and can appear as flow void in OCTA and filling defect and vascular leakage in indocyanine green angiography. Extensive choriocapillaris non-perfusion in the presence of choroidal inflammation can increase the risk of choroidal neovascular membrane development. Iris vascular changes may manifest as dilation of vessels in stroma due to inflammation or rubeosis that is usually from ischemia in retinal periphery secondary to chronic inflammation. More severe forms of scleral inflammation, such as necrotizing scleritis, are associated with vascular occlusion in the deep episcleral plexus, which can lead to necrosis of sclera layer and uveal exposure.

Last updated on 01/31/2021