Publications

Researchers identify factors responsible for chronic nature of autoimmune disease

Researchers identify factors responsible for chronic nature of autoimmune disease

January 4, 2017

Boston, Mass. — Researchers from Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear have uncovered two factors responsible for the chronic, lifelong nature of autoimmune disorders, which tend to “flare up” intermittently in affected patients. These two factors are cell-signaling proteins called cytokines—specifically Interleukin-7 and -15 (IL-7 and IL-15)—that are secreted by cells of the immune system and help modulate memory Th17 cells, a subset of T cells which are known to contribute to autoimmune disorders.

Inflammatory Factors Cause Damage to Back of Eye Following Keratoprosthesis Implantation

Inflammatory Factors Cause Damage to Back of Eye Following Keratoprosthesis Implantation

April 7, 2016

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have identified inflammatory factors that contribute to optic nerve damage following keratoprosthesis (KPro) implantation in a mouse model. They have also shown that blocking one of the factors, TNFa, leads to a significant decrease in optic nerve cell death, suggesting a new direction for preventing optic nerve damage in patients with keratoprosthesis implants.

Joan W. Miller's Champalimaud Award Lecture Now Available

Joan W. Miller's Champalimaud Award Lecture Now Available

March 25, 2016

The free, full-text of the 2015 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO)/Champalimaud Award Lecture, “VEGF: From Discovery to Therapy,” is now available online. Joan W. Miller, MD, the Henry Willard Williams Professor and Chair of HMS Ophthalmology, presented this lecture at the 2015 ARVO Annual Meeting, and the lecture was subsequently published on March 11, 2016 in Translational Vision Science & Technology.

Researchers Resurrect Ancient Viruses in Hopes of Improving Gene Therapy

Researchers Resurrect Ancient Viruses in Hopes of Improving Gene Therapy

July 30, 2015

Boston, MA Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Schepens Eye Research Institute have reconstructed an ancient virus that is highly effective at delivering gene therapies to the liver, muscle, and retina. This discovery, published July 30 in Cell Reports, could potentially be used to design gene therapies that are not only safer and more potent than therapies currently available, but may also help a greater number of patients.