Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease Publications

Yokomizo H, Maeda Y, Park K, Clermont AC, Hernandez SL, Fickweiler W, Li Q, Wang C-H, Paniagua SM, Simao F, Ishikado A, Sun B, Wu I-H, Katagiri S, Pober DM, Tinsley LJ, Avery RL, Feener EP, Kern TS, Keenan HA, Aiello LP, Sun JK, King GL. Retinol binding protein 3 is increased in the retina of patients with diabetes resistant to diabetic retinopathy. Sci Transl Med 2019;11(499)Abstract
The Joslin Medalist Study characterized people affected with type 1 diabetes for 50 years or longer. More than 35% of these individuals exhibit no to mild diabetic retinopathy (DR), independent of glycemic control, suggesting the presence of endogenous protective factors against DR in a subpopulation of patients. Proteomic analysis of retina and vitreous identified retinol binding protein 3 (RBP3), a retinol transport protein secreted mainly by the photoreceptors, as elevated in Medalist patients protected from advanced DR. Mass spectrometry and protein expression analysis identified an inverse association between vitreous RBP3 concentration and DR severity. Intravitreal injection and photoreceptor-specific overexpression of RBP3 in rodents inhibited the detrimental effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Mechanistically, our results showed that recombinant RBP3 exerted the therapeutic effects by binding and inhibiting VEGF receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, by binding to glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and decreasing glucose uptake, RBP3 blocked the detrimental effects of hyperglycemia in inducing inflammatory cytokines in retinal endothelial and Müller cells. Elevated expression of photoreceptor-secreted RBP3 may have a role in protection against the progression of DR due to hyperglycemia by inhibiting glucose uptake via GLUT1 and decreasing the expression of inflammatory cytokines and VEGF.
Bressler NM, Odia I, Maguire M, Glassman AR, Jampol LM, MacCumber MW, Shah C, Rosberger D, Sun JK, Sun JK. Association Between Change in Visual Acuity and Change in Central Subfield Thickness During Treatment of Diabetic Macular Edema in Participants Randomized to Aflibercept, Bevacizumab, or Ranibizumab: A Post Hoc Analysis of the Protocol T Randomized Clinic. JAMA Ophthalmol 2019;Abstract
Importance: The determination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) central subfield thickness (CST) is an objective measure, and visual acuity (VA) is a subjective measure. Therefore, using OCT CST changes as a surrogate for VA changes in diabetic macular edema seems reasonable. However, studies suggest that change in OCT CST following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment for diabetic macular edema is correlated with changes in VA but varies substantially among individuals, and so may not be a good surrogate for changes in VA. Objective: To determine associations between changes in VA and changes in OCT CST across 3 anti-VEGF agents (aflibercept, bevacizumab, or ranibizumab) used in a randomized clinical trial for diabetic macular edema. Design, Setting, and Participants: Post hoc analyses were conducted of DRCR Retina Network Protocol T among 652 of 660 participants (98.8%) meeting inclusion criteria for this investigation. The study was conducted between August 22, 2012, and September 23, 2015. The post hoc data collection and analysis were performed from May 29 to July 11, 2018. Interventions: Six monthly intravitreous anti-VEGF injections (unless success was achieved after 3-5 months) were administered; subsequent injections or focal/grid laser photocoagulation treatments were given as needed per protocol to achieve stability. Main Outcomes and Measures: Association between changes in VA letter score with changes in CST at 12, 52, and 104 weeks after randomization to aflibercept, bevacizumab, or ranibizumab. Results: Of the 652 participants, 304 were women (46.6%); median age was 61 years (interquartile range, 54-67 years). The correlation between CST and VA at the follow-up visits was 0.24 (95% CI, 0.16-0.31) in 616 patients at 12 weeks, 0.31 (95% CI, 0.24-0.38) in 609 patients at 52 weeks, and 0.23 (95% CI, 0.15-0.31) in 566 patients at 104 weeks. The correlation coefficients of change in VA vs change in OCT CST for these time intervals were 0.36 (95% CI, 0.29-0.43) at 12 weeks, 0.36 (95% CI, 0.29-0.43) at 52 weeks, and 0.33 (95% CI, 0.26-0.41) at 104 weeks. Conclusions and Relevance: Changes in CST appear to account for only a small proportion of the total variation in changes in VA. These findings do not support using changes in OCT CST as a surrogate for changes in VA in phase 3 clinical trials evaluating anti-VEGF for diabetic macular edema or as a guide to inform the physician or patient about changes in VA after anti-VEGF treatment. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01627249.
AbdelAl O, Ashraf M, Sampani K, Sun JK. "For Mass Eye and Ear Special Issue" Adaptive Optics in the Evaluation of Diabetic Retinopathy. Semin Ophthalmol 2019;:1-9.Abstract
Retinal imaging is a fundamental tool for clinical and research efforts in the evaluation and management of diabetic retinopathy. Adaptive optics (AO) is an imaging technique that enables correction of over 90% of the optical aberrations of an individual eye induced primarily by the tear film, cornea and lens. The two major tasks of any AO system are to measure the optical imperfections of the eye and to then compensate for these aberrations to generate a corrected wavefront of reflected light from the eye. AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) provides a theoretical lateral resolution limit of 1.4 μm, allowing the study of microscopic features of the retinal vascular and neural tissue. AOSLO studies have revealed irregularities of the photoreceptor mosaic, vascular loss, and details of vascular lesions in diabetic eyes that may provide new insight into development, regression, and response to therapy of diabetic eye disease.
Chantarasorn Y, Kim EL, Thabsuwan K. MACULAR ADD-ON INTRAOCULAR LENS SUCCESSFULLY RESTORES READING VISION IN EYES WITH END-STAGE DIABETIC MACULAR DISEASE. Retin Cases Brief Rep 2019;Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the outcomes of macular add-on intraocular lens implantation in improving reading vision in patients with bilateral advanced diabetic maculopathy. METHODS: In this retrospective study, a supplementary bifocal sulcus intraocular lens (Scharioth Macular Lens) was implanted in the better-seeing eye of five patients. Baseline-corrected distance vision, corrected near visual acuity, a preoperative simulation test, and multimodal imaging were collected. The primary outcome was the uncorrected near visual acuity at a working distance of 15 cm, at a 12-month follow-up. RESULTS: Study patients included 3 cases of refractory subfoveal exudation and 2 cases of diabetic macular ischemia. A preoperative test to assess the potential gain in near vision showed an improvement of ≥2 paragraphs on the RADNER reading chart in all patients. At 12 months, median reading vision (corrected near visual acuity at 15 cm) significantly improved from 20/125 (range 20/50-20/200) preoperatively to uncorrected near visual acuity (at 15 cm) of 20/50 (range 20/40-20/80) (P = 0.042; Wilcoxon signed-ranks test). Distance vision remained unchanged in four patients. All patients were able to achieve the size of newsprint (20/50 Snellen equivalent), within the first 3 months. CONCLUSION: The macular add-on intraocular lens improves reading vision in visually impaired patients due to end-stage diabetic macular disease.
Laville V, Kang JH, Cousins CC, Iglesias AI, Nagy R, Cooke Bailey JN, Igo RP, Song YE, Chasman DI, Christen WG, Kraft P, Rosner BA, Hu F, Wilson JF, Gharahkhani P, Hewitt AW, Mackey DA, Hysi PG, Hammond CJ, van Duijn CM, Haines JL, Vitart V, Fingert JH, Hauser MA, Aschard H, Wiggs JL, Khawaja AP, Macgregor S, Pasquale LR, UK Biobank, International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium NEIGHBORHOODC. Genetic correlations between diabetes and glaucoma: an analysis of continuous and dichotomous phenotypes. Am J Ophthalmol 2019;Abstract
PURPOSE: A genetic correlation is the proportion of phenotypic variance between traits that is shared on a genetic basis. Here we explore genetic correlations between diabetes- and glaucoma-related traits. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: We assembled genome-wide association study summary statistics from European-derived participants regarding diabetes-related traits like fasting blood sugar (FBS) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and glaucoma-related traits (intraocular pressure (IOP), central corneal thickness (CCT), corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), cup-disc ratio (CDR), and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG)). We included data from the National Eye Institute Glaucoma Human Genetics Collaboration Heritable Overall Operational Database, the UK Biobank and the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium. We calculated genetic correlation (r) between traits using linkage disequilibrium score regression. We also calculated genetic correlations between IOP, CCT and selected diabetes-related traits based on individual level phenotype data in two Northern European population-based samples using pedigree information and Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines (SOLAR). RESULTS: Overall, there was little r between diabetes- and glaucoma-related traits. Specifically, we found a non-significant negative correlation between T2D and POAG (r=-0.14; p=0.16). Using SOLAR, the genetic correlations between measured IOP, CCT, FBS, fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c, were null. In contrast, genetic correlations between IOP and POAG (r ≥0.45; p≤3.0E-04) and between CDR and POAG were high (r =0.57; p=2.8E-10). However, genetic correlations between corneal properties (CCT, CRF and CH) and POAG were low (r range: -0.18 - 0.11) and non-significant (p≥0.07). CONCLUSION: These analyses suggest there is limited genetic correlation between diabetes- and glaucoma-related traits.
Baker CW, Glassman AR, Beaulieu WT, Antoszyk AN, Browning DJ, Chalam KV, Grover S, Jampol LM, Jhaveri CD, Melia M, Stockdale CR, Martin DF, Sun JK, Sun JK. Effect of Initial Management With Aflibercept vs Laser Photocoagulation vs Observation on Vision Loss Among Patients With Diabetic Macular Edema Involving the Center of the Macula and Good Visual Acuity: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA 2019;Abstract
Importance: Intravitreous injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor agents are effective for treating diabetic macular edema (DME) involving the center of the macula (center-involved DME [CI-DME]) with visual acuity impairment (20/32 or worse). The best approach to treating patients with CI-DME and good visual acuity (20/25 or better) is unknown. Objective: To compare vision loss at 2 years among eyes initially managed with aflibercept, laser photocoagulation, or observation. Design, Setting, and Participants: Randomized clinical trial conducted at 91 US and Canadian sites among 702 adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Participants had 1 study eye with CI-DME and visual acuity of 20/25 or better. The first participant was randomized on November 8, 2013, and the final date of follow-up was September 11, 2018. Interventions: Eyes were randomly assigned to 2.0 mg of intravitreous aflibercept (n = 226) as frequently as every 4 weeks, focal/grid laser photocoagulation (n = 240), or observation (n = 236). Aflibercept was required for eyes in the laser photocoagulation or observation groups that had decreased visual acuity from baseline by at least 10 letters (≥ 2 lines on an eye chart) at any visit or by 5 to 9 letters (1-2 lines) at 2 consecutive visits. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was at least a 5-letter visual acuity decrease from baseline at 2 years. Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration adverse events (defined as myocardial infarction, stroke, or vascular or unknown death) were reported. Results: Among 702 randomized participants (mean age, 59 years; 38% female [n=264]), 625 of 681 (92% excluding deaths) completed the 2-year visit. For eyes with visual acuity that decreased from baseline, aflibercept was initiated in 25% (60/240) and 34% (80/326) in the laser photocoagulation and observation groups, respectively. At 2 years, the percentage of eyes with at least a 5-letter visual acuity decrease was 16% (33/205), 17% (36/212), and 19% (39/208) in the aflibercept, laser photocoagulation, and observation groups, respectively (aflibercept vs laser photocoagulation risk difference, -2% [95% CI, -9% to 5%]; relative risk, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.57-1.35; P = .79]; aflibercept vs observation risk difference, -3% [95% CI, -11% to 4%]; relative risk, 0.83 [95% CI, 0.55-1.27; P = .79]; laser photocoagulation vs observation risk difference, -1% [95% CI, -9% to 6%]; relative risk, 0.95 [95% CI, 0.64-1.41; P = .79]). Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration vascular events occurred in 15 (7%), 13 (5%), and 8 (3%) participants in the aflibercept, laser photocoagulation, and observation groups. Conclusions and Relevance: Among eyes with CI-DME and good visual acuity, there was no significant difference in vision loss at 2 years whether eyes were initially managed with aflibercept or with laser photocoagulation or observation and given aflibercept only if visual acuity worsened. Observation without treatment unless visual acuity worsens may be a reasonable strategy for CI-DME. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01909791.
Sayres R, Taly A, Rahimy E, Blumer K, Coz D, Hammel N, Krause J, Narayanaswamy A, Rastegar Z, Wu D, Xu S, Barb S, Joseph A, Shumski M, Smith J, Sood AB, Corrado GS, Peng L, Webster DR. Using a Deep Learning Algorithm and Integrated Gradients Explanation to Assist Grading for Diabetic Retinopathy. Ophthalmology 2019;126(4):552-564.Abstract
PURPOSE: To understand the impact of deep learning diabetic retinopathy (DR) algorithms on physician readers in computer-assisted settings. DESIGN: Evaluation of diagnostic technology. PARTICIPANTS: One thousand seven hundred ninety-six retinal fundus images from 1612 diabetic patients. METHODS: Ten ophthalmologists (5 general ophthalmologists, 4 retina specialists, 1 retina fellow) read images for DR severity based on the International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy disease severity scale in each of 3 conditions: unassisted, grades only, or grades plus heatmap. Grades-only assistance comprised a histogram of DR predictions (grades) from a trained deep-learning model. For grades plus heatmap, we additionally showed explanatory heatmaps. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: For each experiment arm, we computed sensitivity and specificity of each reader and the algorithm for different levels of DR severity against an adjudicated reference standard. We also measured accuracy (exact 5-class level agreement and Cohen's quadratically weighted κ), reader-reported confidence (5-point Likert scale), and grading time. RESULTS: Readers graded more accurately with model assistance than without for the grades-only condition (P < 0.001). Grades plus heatmaps improved accuracy for patients with DR (P < 0.001), but reduced accuracy for patients without DR (P = 0.006). Both forms of assistance increased readers' sensitivity moderate-or-worse DR: unassisted: mean, 79.4% [95% confidence interval (CI), 72.3%-86.5%]; grades only: mean, 87.5% [95% CI, 85.1%-89.9%]; grades plus heatmap: mean, 88.7% [95% CI, 84.9%-92.5%] without a corresponding drop in specificity (unassisted: mean, 96.6% [95% CI, 95.9%-97.4%]; grades only: mean, 96.1% [95% CI, 95.5%-96.7%]; grades plus heatmap: mean, 95.5% [95% CI, 94.8%-96.1%]). Algorithmic assistance increased the accuracy of retina specialists above that of the unassisted reader or model alone; and increased grading confidence and grading time across all readers. For most cases, grades plus heatmap was only as effective as grades only. Over the course of the experiment, grading time decreased across all conditions, although most sharply for grades plus heatmap. CONCLUSIONS: Deep learning algorithms can improve the accuracy of, and confidence in, DR diagnosis in an assisted read setting. They also may increase grading time, although these effects may be ameliorated with experience.
Haque M, Lei F, Xiong X, Das JK, Ren X, Fang D, Salek-Ardakani S, Yang J-M, Song J. Stem cell-derived tissue-associated regulatory T cells suppress the activity of pathogenic cells in autoimmune diabetes. JCI Insight 2019;4(7)Abstract
The autoantigen-specific Tregs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), i.e., PSC-Tregs, have the ability to suppress autoimmunity. PSC-Tregs can be programmed to be tissue associated and to infiltrate into local inflamed tissues to suppress autoimmune responses after adoptive transfer. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which the autoantigen-specific PSC-Tregs suppress the autoimmune response remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we generated functional autoantigen-specific Tregs from the induced PSC (iPSCs), i.e., iPSC-Tregs, and investigated the underlying mechanisms of autoimmunity suppression by these Tregs in a type 1 diabetes (T1D) murine model. A double-Tg mouse model of T1D was established in F1 mice, in which the first generation of RIP-mOVA Tg mice that were crossed with OT-I T cell receptor (TCR) Tg mice was challenged with vaccinia viruses expressing OVA (VACV-OVA). We show that adoptive transfer of OVA-specific iPSC-Tregs greatly suppressed autoimmunity in the animal model and prevented the insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells from destruction. Further, we demonstrate that the adoptive transfer significantly reduced the expression of ICAM-1 in the diabetic pancreas and inhibited the migration of pathogenic CD8+ T cells and the production of the proinflammatory IFN-γ in the pancreas. These results indicate that the stem cell-derived tissue-associated Tregs can robustly accumulate in the diabetic pancreas, and, through downregulating the expression of ICAM-1 in the local inflamed tissues and inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, suppress the migration and activity of the pathogenic immune cells that cause T1D.
Busch C, Fraser-Bell S, Zur D, Rodríguez-Valdés PJ, Cebeci Z, Lupidi M, Fung AT, Gabrielle P-H, Giancipoli E, Chaikitmongkol V, Okada M, Laíns I, Santos AR, Kunavisarut P, Sala-Puigdollers A, Chhablani J, Ozimek M, Hilely A, Unterlauft JD, Loewenstein A, Iglicki M, Rehak M, Rehak M. Real-world outcomes of observation and treatment in diabetic macular edema with very good visual acuity: the OBTAIN study. Acta Diabetol 2019;56(7):777-784.Abstract
AIMS: To describe and compare the functional and anatomical outcomes of untreated and treated diabetic macular edema (DME) in eyes with very good baseline visual acuity (VA) in a real-world setting. METHODS: A 12-month, retrospective, multicenter, observational cohort study, including DME patients with baseline visual acuity (VA) ≤ 0.1 logMAR (≥ 20/25 Snellen) and central subfield thickness (CST) > 250 µm with intra- and/or subretinal fluid seen on optical coherence tomography. RESULTS: A total of 249 eyes were included, of which 155 were treated and 94 were non-treated during follow-up. Most eyes maintained vision (VA gain or VA loss < 5 letters) at 12 months (treated: 58.1%; non-treated: 73.4%). In non-treated eyes with stable VA within the first 6 months, VA was maintained throughout the follow-up in most cases (86.3%). In non-treated eyes with VA loss ≥ 5 letters within 6 months (36.7%), further observation led to worse visual outcome than treatment (- 4.2 vs. - 7.8 letters, p = 0.013). In eyes in which treatment was initiated at baseline (n = 102), treatment with 8-12 anti-VEGF injections led to better visual outcome compared to treatment with less injections (- 0.3 ± 3.6 letters vs. - 3.8 ± 6.2 letters, p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: In a real-world setting, the majority of DME patients with very good VA maintained vision at 12 months, regardless of whether the DME was treated or not. This study supports close observation of eyes with DME and very good VA with consideration of treatment when a one line drop in vision is observed.
Pearsall EA, Cheng R, Matsuzaki S, Zhou K, Ding L, Ahn B, Kinter M, Humphries KM, Quiambao AB, Farjo RA, Ma J-X. Neuroprotective effects of PPARα in retinopathy of type 1 diabetes. PLoS One 2019;14(2):e0208399.Abstract
Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common neurovascular complication of type 1 diabetes. Current therapeutics target neovascularization characteristic of end-stage disease, but are associated with significant adverse effects. Targeting early events of DR such as neurodegeneration may lead to safer and more effective approaches to treatment. Two independent prospective clinical trials unexpectedly identified that the PPARα agonist fenofibrate had unprecedented therapeutic effects in DR, but gave little insight into the physiological and molecular mechanisms of action. The objective of the present study was to evaluate potential neuroprotective effects of PPARα in DR, and subsequently to identify the responsible mechanism of action. Here we reveal that activation of PPARα had a robust protective effect on retinal function as shown by Optokinetic tracking in a rat model of type 1 diabetes, and also decreased retinal cell death, as demonstrated by a DNA fragmentation ELISA. Further, PPARα ablation exacerbated diabetes-induced decline of visual function as demonstrated by ERG analysis. We further found that PPARα improved mitochondrial efficiency in DR, and decreased ROS production and cell death in cultured retinal neurons. Oxidative stress biomarkers were elevated in diabetic Pparα-/- mice, suggesting increased oxidative stress. Mitochondrially mediated apoptosis and oxidative stress secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to neurodegeneration in DR. Taken together, these findings identify a robust neuroprotective effect for PPARα in DR, which may be due to improved mitochondrial function and subsequent alleviation of energetic deficits, oxidative stress and mitochondrially mediated apoptosis.
Bressler SB, Odia I, Maguire MG, Dhoot DS, Glassman AR, Jampol LM, Marcus DM, Solomon SD, Sun JK, Sun JK. Factors Associated With Visual Acuity and Central Subfield Thickness Changes When Treating Diabetic Macular Edema With Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Therapy: An Exploratory Analysis of the Protocol T Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Ophthalmol 2019;Abstract
Importance: Identifying the factors that are associated with the magnitude of treatment benefits from anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy for diabetic macular edema (DME) may help refine treatment expectations. Objective: To identify the baseline factors that are associated with vision and anatomic outcomes when managing DME with anti-VEGF and determine if there are interactions between factors and the agent administered. Design, Setting, and Participants: This post hoc analysis of data from the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network multicenter randomized clinical trial , Protocol T, was conducted between December 2016 and December 2017. Between August 22, 2012, and August 28, 2013, 660 participants were enrolled with central-involved DME and vision impairment (approximate Snellen equivalent, 20/32-20/320). Interventions: Repeated 0.05-mL intravitreous injections of 2.0-mg aflibercept (201 eyes), 1.25-mg bevacizumab (185 eyes), or 0.3-mg ranibizumab (192 eyes) per protocol. Main Outcomes and Measures: Change in visual acuity (VA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) central subfield thickness at 2 years and change in VA over 2 years (area under the curve [AUC]). Results: Among 578 participants, the median age (interquartile range) was 61 (54-67) years. Across anti-VEGF treatment groups, each baseline factor was associated with mean improvement in VA and a reduction in central DME compared with the baseline. For every decade of participant age, the mean VA improvement was reduced by 2.1 letters (95% CI, -3.0 to -1.2; P < .001) in the VA and 1.9 letters (95% CI, -2.4 to -1.3; P < .001) in the VA AUC analyses. For each 1% increase in hemoglobin A1c levels, VA improvement was reduced by 1 letter in the VA (95% CI, -1.5 to -0.5; P < .001) and 0.5 letters (95% CI, -0.9 to -0.2; P < .001) in the VA AUC analyses. Eyes with no prior panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) and less than severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy had an approximately 3-letter improvement in the VA (95% CI, 0.9-5.4; P = .007) and VA AUC (95% CI, 1.3-4.2; P < .001) analyses compared with eyes with prior PRP. On average, African American participants had greater reductions in central subfield thickness compared with eyes of white participants (-27.3 μm, P = .01), as did eyes with central subretinal fluid compared with eyes without this OCT feature (-22.9 μm, P = .01). There were no interactions between the predictive factors and the specific anti-VEGF agent that was administered for any VA or OCT outcome. Conclusions and Relevance: Lower hemoglobin A1c levels were associated with the magnitude of vision improvement following anti-VEGF therapy, providing further evidence to encourage glycemic control among persons with diabetes. Younger patients and those without prior PRP might expect greater improvement in VA than older patients or those with prior PRP.
Pollack S, Igo RP, Jensen RA, Christiansen M, Li X, Cheng C-Y, Ng MCY, Smith AV, Rossin EJ, Segrè AV, Davoudi S, Tan GS, Chen Y-DI, Kuo JZ, Dimitrov LM, Stanwyck LK, Meng W, Hosseini MS, Imamura M, Nousome D, Kim J, Hai Y, Jia Y, Ahn J, Leong A, Shah K, Park KH, Guo X, Ipp E, Taylor KD, Adler SG, Sedor JR, Freedman BI, Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes-Eye Research Group DCCT/EDICRG, Lee I-T, Sheu WH-H, Kubo M, Takahashi A, Hadjadj S, Marre M, Tregouet D-A, McKean-Cowdin R, Varma R, McCarthy MI, Groop L, Ahlqvist E, Lyssenko V, Agardh E, Morris A, Doney ASF, Colhoun HM, Toppila I, Sandholm N, Groop P-H, Maeda S, Hanis CL, Penman A, Chen CJ, Hancock H, Mitchell P, Craig JE, Chew EY, Paterson AD, Grassi MA, Palmer C, Bowden DW, Yaspan BL, Siscovick D, Cotch MF, Wang JJ, Burdon KP, Wong TY, Klein BEK, Klein R, Rotter JI, Iyengar SK, Price AL, Sobrin L. Multiethnic Genome-Wide Association Study of Diabetic Retinopathy Using Liability Threshold Modeling of Duration of Diabetes and Glycemic Control. Diabetes 2019;68(2):441-456.Abstract
To identify genetic variants associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR), we performed a large multiethnic genome-wide association study. Discovery included eight European cohorts ( = 3,246) and seven African American cohorts ( = 2,611). We meta-analyzed across cohorts using inverse-variance weighting, with and without liability threshold modeling of glycemic control and duration of diabetes. Variants with a value <1 × 10 were investigated in replication cohorts that included 18,545 European, 16,453 Asian, and 2,710 Hispanic subjects. After correction for multiple testing, the C allele of rs142293996 in an intron of nuclear VCP-like () was associated with DR in European discovery cohorts ( = 2.1 × 10), but did not reach genome-wide significance after meta-analysis with replication cohorts. We applied the Disease Association Protein-Protein Link Evaluator (DAPPLE) to our discovery results to test for evidence of risk being spread across underlying molecular pathways. One protein-protein interaction network built from genes in regions associated with proliferative DR was found to have significant connectivity ( = 0.0009) and corroborated with gene set enrichment analyses. These findings suggest that genetic variation in as well as variation within a protein-protein interaction network that includes genes implicated in inflammation, may influence risk for DR.
Sun JK, Wang P-W, Taylor S, Haskova Z. Durability of Diabetic Retinopathy Improvement with As-Needed Ranibizumab: Open-Label Extension of RIDE and RISE Studies. Ophthalmology 2019;126(5):712-720.Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the durability of diabetic retinopathy (DR) improvements after a change in ranibizumab dosing from monthly to individualized pro re nata (PRN) therapy. DESIGN: Pooled analysis of the open-label extension (OLE) of RIDE and RISE (clinicaltrials.gov identifiers, NCT00473382 and NCT00473330) patients with DR and diabetic macular edema (DME). PARTICIPANTS: Patients who completed 36-month participation in RIDE and RISE and entered the OLE. METHODS: In RIDE and RISE, patients (n = 759) were randomized 1:1:1 to ranibizumab 0.3 mg monthly, 0.5 mg monthly, or monthly sham injections with rescue macular laser available after 6 months, per protocol-specified criteria. After 24 months, sham patients crossed over to ranibizumab 0.5 mg monthly. After 36 months in the core studies, patients in the OLE (n = 500) could receive ranibizumab 0.5 mg PRN based on predefined DME re-treatment criteria. Diabetic retinopathy severity was evaluated photographically using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study DR severity scale. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Change in DR severity from months 36 to 48 by re-treatment status. RESULTS: Among patients who entered the OLE, 121 of 500 (24%) did not require additional ranibizumab injections. Overall, 367 patients had evaluable DR at months 36 and 48. Among patients not requiring ranibizumab re-treatment from months 36 to 48 (88/367), 57% to 78%, 0% to 7%, and 22% to 36% experienced DR severity stability, 2-step or more improvement, and 2-step or more worsening, respectively. Among patients requiring ranibizumab re-treatment (279/367), 84% to 94%, 2%, and 3% to 14% experienced DR severity stability, 2-step or more improvement, and 2-step or more worsening, respectively. On average, vision improvements were maintained during the OLE regardless of change in DR severity. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetic retinopathy severity improvements with ranibizumab were maintained in over 70% of OLE patients after switching from ranibizumab monthly to an individualized ranibizumab 0.5 mg PRN dosing regimen. Because approximately one third of OLE patients experienced DR worsening, careful monitoring should be part of the long-term management of patients with DR.
Sun JK, Glassman AR, Beaulieu WT, Stockdale CR, Bressler NM, Flaxel C, Gross JG, Shami M, Jampol LM, Jampol LM. Rationale and Application of the Protocol S Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Algorithm for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy. Ophthalmology 2019;126(1):87-95.Abstract
PURPOSE: To present the rationale, guidelines, and results of ranibizumab treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) in Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) Protocol S. DESIGN: Post hoc analyses from a randomized clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred five participants (394 study eyes) having PDR without prior panretinal photocoagulation (PRP). METHODS: Intravitreous ranibizumab (0.5 mg) versus PRP for PDR. Ranbizumab-assigned eyes (n = 191) received monthly injections for 6 months unless resolution was achieved after 4 injections. After 6 months, injections could be deferred if neovascularization was stable over 3 consecutive visits (sustained stability). If neovascularization worsened, monthly treatment resumed. Panretinal photocoagulation could be initiated for failure or futility criteria. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neovascularization status through 2 years. RESULTS: At 1 month, 19% (35 of 188) of ranibizumab-assigned eyes showed complete neovascularization resolution and an additional 60% (113) showed improvement. At 6 months, 52% (80 of 153) showed neovascularization resolution, 3% (4) were improved, 37% (56) were stable, and 8% (13) had worsened since the last visit. Among eyes with versus without resolved neovascularization at 6 months, the median (interquartile range) number of injections between 6 months and 2 years was 4 (1-7; n = 73) versus 7 (4-11; n = 67; P < 0.001). Injections were deferred in 68 of 73 eyes (93%) meeting sustained stability at least once during the study; 62% (42 of 68) resumed injections within 16 weeks after deferral. At 2 years, 43% (66 of 154) showed neovascularization resolution, 5% (7) showed improvement, 23% (36) were stable, and 27% (42) had worsened since the last visit. Only 3 eyes met criteria for failure or futility through 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: The DRCR.net treatment algorithm for PDR can provide excellent clinical outcomes through 2 years for patients initiating anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy for PDR. When choosing between anti-VEGF and PRP as first-line therapy for PDR, treatment decisions should be guided by consideration of the relative advantages of each therapeutic method and anticipated patient compliance with follow-up and treatment recommendations.

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