Strabismus

Strabismus Publications

Elhusseiny AM, Gore C, Sadiq MAA, Dagi LR, Kazlas M, Hunter DG. Self-grading effect of inferior oblique myectomy and recession. J AAPOS 2020;Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the outcomes of inferior oblique (IO) weakening surgery, whether recession or myectomy, and to assess the dose-response relationship and correlation with angle of preoperative hypertropia. METHODS: The medical records of all patients with vertical deviation in primary gaze who underwent unilateral IO-weakening surgery, either recession or myectomy, at Boston Children's Hospital over an 8-year period with a minimum postoperative follow-up of 1 month were reviewed retrospectively. Outcome measures were effect of IO weakening surgery on vertical deviation in primary gaze and its correlation with the preoperative angle of hyperdeviation. Secondary outcomes included resolution of abnormal head posture, reduction of ocular torsion, and postoperative under- and overcorrection RESULTS: A total of 94 patients were identified (mean age at surgery, 29.3 ± 19.8 years; range, 1-69). The mean postoperative follow-up period was 17.2 ± 15 months. IO recession was performed in 30 patients; IO myectomy, in 64. Surgical success in primary position was achieved in 72 patients (77%), with resolution of anomalous preoperative head posture in 93%. The mean effect on alignment in primary position was 11.3 ± 6.8. The response to IO-weakening surgery was strongly correlated with the preoperative hyperdeviation for both recession (R = 0.53) and myectomy (R = 0.87). CONCLUSIONS: As with other types of strabismus surgery, IO weakening has a "self-grading" contribution, in which the surgical effect strongly correlates with the magnitude of preoperative deviation. A large range of vertical misalignment can be corrected with the same surgical approach.
Dagi LR, Elhusseiny AM. Adjustable graded augmentation of superior rectus transposition for treatment of abducens nerve palsy and Duane syndrome. J AAPOS 2020;Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the results of adjustable graded augmentation of superior rectus transposition, a novel modification of superior rectus transposition (SRT) designed to reduce postoperative vertical or torsional diplopia. METHODS: The medical records of patients who underwent adjustable graded augmentation of SRT with or without adjustable medial rectus recession (MRc) from February 2017 to December 2019 were reviewed retrospectively. A Mendez ring was used to monitor torsional change after transposition of the superior rectus muscle to the lateral rectus muscle and after sequential placement of 2 or 3 augmentation sutures by superior rectus-lateral rectus loop myopexy. If excessive mechanical intorsion was induced, the responsible augmentation suture was severed intraoperatively. If torsional or vertical diplopia was noted after recovery, the distal-most augmentation suture was cut. Exotropia was managed by severing the distal-most augmentation suture or by medial rectus adjustment. RESULTS: A total of 8 patients who underwent adjustable graded augmentation of SRT were included (6 using the 3-suture technique): 3 for esotropic Duane syndrome, 2 for abducens nerve palsy, 1 for Moebius syndrome, and 2 for combined trochlear and abducens nerve palsies. Of the 8 patients, 4 had prior strabismus surgery, and 1 patient had previously undergone treatment with botulinum toxin. Severing one augmentation suture in 3 cases resolved vertical (n = 2) or torsional (n = 1) diplopia and consecutive exotropia (n = 1), resulting in excellent alignment and reduction of torticollis to <4° in 7 cases. The technique proved insufficient in 1 patient, who had undergone 3 prior strabismus procedures. CONCLUSIONS: In this study cohort, adjustable graded augmentation of SRT effectively managed the risk of postoperative vertical or torsional diplopia.
Whitman MC, Di Gioia SA, Chan W-M, Gelber A, Pratt BM, Bell JL, Collins TE, Knowles JA, Armoskus C, Pato M, Pato C, Shaaban S, Staffieri S, MacKinnon S, Maconachie GDE, Elder JE, Traboulsi EI, Gottlob I, Mackey DA, Hunter DG, Engle EC, Engle EC. Recurrent Rare Copy Number Variants Increase Risk for Esotropia. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2020;61(10):22.Abstract
Purpose: To determine whether rare copy number variants (CNVs) increase risk for comitant esotropia. Methods: CNVs were identified in 1614 Caucasian individuals with comitant esotropia and 3922 Caucasian controls from Illumina SNP genotyping using two Hidden Markov model (HMM) algorithms, PennCNV and QuantiSNP, which call CNVs based on logR ratio and B allele frequency. Deletions and duplications greater than 10 kb were included. Common CNVs were excluded. Association testing was performed with 1 million permutations in PLINK. Significant CNVs were confirmed with digital droplet polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). Whole genome sequencing was performed to determine insertion location and breakpoints. Results: Esotropia patients have similar rates and proportions of CNVs compared with controls but greater total length and average size of both deletions and duplications. Three recurrent rare duplications significantly (P = 1 × 10-6) increase the risk of esotropia: chromosome 2p11.2 (hg19, 2:87428677-87965359), spanning one long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) and two microRNAs (OR 14.16; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.4-38.1); chromosome 4p15.2 (hg19, 4:25554332-25577184), spanning one lncRNA (OR 11.1; 95% CI 4.6-25.2); chromosome 10q11.22 (hg19, 10:47049547-47703870) spanning seven protein-coding genes, one lncRNA, and four pseudogenes (OR 8.96; 95% CI 5.4-14.9). Overall, 114 cases (7%) and only 28 controls (0.7%) had one of the three rare duplications. No case nor control had more than one of these three duplications. Conclusions: Rare CNVs are a source of genetic variation that contribute to the genetic risk for comitant esotropia, which is likely polygenic. Future research into the functional consequences of these recurrent duplications may shed light on the pathophysiology of esotropia.
Dagi LR, Velez FG, Archer SM, Atalay HT, Campolattaro BN, Holmes JM, Kerr NC, Kushner BJ, MacKinnon SE, Paysse EA, Pihlblad MS, Pineles SL, Strominger MB, Stager DR, Stager D, Capo H. Adult Strabismus Preferred Practice Pattern®. Ophthalmology 2020;127(1):P182-P298.
Elhusseiny AM, Huynh EM, Dagi LR. Evaluation and Management of V pattern Strabismus in Craniosynostosis. J Binocul Vis Ocul Motil 2019;:1-6.Abstract
V pattern strabismus is the most common ocular motor disorder reported in patients with craniosynostosis. Strabismus management may prove challenging, and few studies provide perspective on surgical approach. The purpose of this review is to discuss evaluation and surgical options for treating V pattern strabismus in patients with craniosynostosis. We provide a step-by-step approach to facilitate surgical planning.
Serafino M, Granet DB, Kushner BJ, Dagi LR, Kekunnaya R, Nucci P. Use of the Delphi process for defining successful outcomes for strabismus surgery. J AAPOS 2019;23(6):309-312.Abstract
The purpose of this review was to identify areas of consensus and disagreement among experts for the definition of success following strabismus surgery using the Delphi process. Three rounds of electronic questionnaires were sent to a panel of 28 strabismus experts. Throughout the process, members of the panel were masked to one another's identities to minimize the possibility of influence among members. Prior to data collection, we defined consensus as an 85% agreement on the answer to each question. Questions for which there was no consensus were reworded, and the resultant new questions were used in each subsequent round of questioning. We arrived at consensus for 23 of the 36 questions (64%). Consensus was obtained for recommending unique criteria for the definition of success for certain specific strabismus conditions. In addition, it was considered important that stereopsis and the range of single binocular vision be included in the definition of success for certain types of strabismus.
Heidary G, MacKinnon S, Elliott A, Barry BJ, Engle EC, Hunter DG. Outcomes of strabismus surgery in genetically confirmed congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles. J AAPOS 2019;Abstract
PURPOSE: To detail surgical strategy and strabismus outcomes in a genetically defined cohort of patients with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM). METHODS: A total of 13 patients with genetically confirmed CFEOM (via genetic testing for mutations in KIF21A, PHOX2A, and TUBB3) were retrospectively identified after undergoing strabismus surgery at Boston Children's Hospital and surgical outcomes were compared. RESULTS: Age at first surgery ranged from 11 months to 63 years, with an average of 3 strabismus procedures per patient. Ten patients had CFEOM1, of whom 9 had the KIF21A R954W amino acid (AA) substitution and 1 had the M947T AA substitution. Of the 3 with CFEOM3, 2 had the TUBB3 E410K AA substitution, and 1 had a previously unreported E410V AA substitution. CFEOM1 patients all underwent at least 1 procedure to address chin-up posture. Chin-up posture improved from 24° ± 8° before surgery to 10.0° ± 8° postoperatively (P < 0.001). Three CFEOM1 patients developed exotropia after vertical muscle surgery alone; all had the R954W AA substitution. Postoperatively, 1 CFEOM1 patient developed a corneal ulcer. All CFEOM3 patients appeared to have underlying exposure keratopathy, successfully treated with prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem (PROSE) lens in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS: CFEOM is a complex strabismus disorder for which surgical management is difficult. Despite an aggressive surgical approach, multiple procedures may be necessary to achieve a desirable surgical effect. Knowledge of the underlying genetic diagnosis may help to inform surgical management.
Dorr M, Kwon MY, Lesmes LA, Miller A, Kazlas M, Chan K, Hunter DG, Lu Z-L, Bex PJ. Binocular Summation and Suppression of Contrast Sensitivity in Strabismus, Fusion and Amblyopia. Front Hum Neurosci 2019;13:234.Abstract
: Amblyopia and strabismus affect 2%-5% of the population and cause a broad range of visual deficits. The response to treatment is generally assessed using visual acuity, which is an insensitive measure of visual function and may, therefore, underestimate binocular vision gains in these patients. On the other hand, the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) generally takes longer to assess than visual acuity, but it is better correlated with improvement in a range of visual tasks and, notably, with improvements in binocular vision. The present study aims to assess monocular and binocular CSFs in amblyopia and strabismus patients. : Both monocular CSFs and the binocular CSF were assessed for subjects with amblyopia ( = 11), strabismus without amblyopia ( = 20), and normally sighted controls ( = 24) using a tablet-based implementation of the quick CSF, which can assess a full CSF in <3 min. Binocular summation was evaluated against a baseline model of simple probability summation. : The CSF of amblyopic eyes was impaired at mid-to-high spatial frequencies compared to fellow eyes, strabismic eyes without amblyopia, and control eyes. Binocular contrast summation exceeded probability summation in controls, but not in subjects with amblyopia (with or without strabismus) or strabismus without amblyopia who were able to fuse at the test distance. Binocular summation was less than probability summation in strabismic subjects who were unable to fuse. : We conclude that monocular and binocular contrast sensitivity deficits define important characteristics of amblyopia and strabismus that are not captured by visual acuity alone and can be measured efficiently using the quick CSF.
Escuder AG, Hunter DG. The Role of Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of Strabismus. Semin Ophthalmol 2019;:1-7.Abstract
: To perform a systematic review of the application of botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the management of strabismus in the adult and pediatric populations. : A systematic literature search was performed using the Medline database. : In 1989, with the FDA approval of botulinum toxin (onabotulinum toxin A, or BTA) for the treatment of strabismus, patients were provided with an alternative to surgical recession. In this review, we discuss the uses of BTA in the treatment of acute onset comitant esotropia or smaller angle esotropia and as an adjunct to surgery for larger angle esotropia or sixth nerve palsy. Its uses are also explored in intermittent exotropia and vertical strabismus, including thyroid-associated orbitopathy, fourth nerve palsies, and other orbital pathology. : Despite its transient kinetics, BTA can have permanent effects on ocular alignment, promoting binocularity and reduction of diplopia, and can serve as a primary treatment or a muscle sparing option in patients at risk of anterior segment ischemia or need for future surgeries.
Somsen D, Heidary G. Rapid onset of orbital cellulitis after uncomplicated strabismus surgery. J AAPOS 2019;Abstract
Orbital cellulitis is extremely uncommon following strabismus surgery. When it occurs, the infection has been reported to present from day 1 to within 1 week following surgery and has the potential for significant morbidity postoperatively. We report the case of a 6-year-old boy presenting with unilateral orbital cellulitis growing group A Streptococcus pyogenes on postoperative day 1, after uncomplicated bilateral medial rectus recessions. The patient had two contacts with streptococcal pharyngitis at the time of surgery but was completely asymptomatic himself. We hypothesize that these contacts may have led to the rapid onset of his orbital cellulitis.
Bronstad MP, Peli E, Liu R, Doherty A, Fulton AB. High prevalence of strabismic visual field expansion in pediatric homonymous hemianopia. PLoS One 2018;13(12):e0209213.Abstract
If homonymous hemianopia develops in childhood it is frequently accompanied by strabismus. In some of these cases the strabismus increases the size of the binocular visual field. We determined how prevalent visual-field-expanding strabismus is in children who have homonymous hemianopia. Medical records were examined from 103 hemianopic patients with exotropia (XT) or esotropia (ET). For each participant, we determined whether their strabismus was in a direction that resulted in visual field expansion (i.e. left exotropia with left homonymous hemianopia). Ages at which hemianopia and strabismus were first noted were compared to determine which developed first. The prevalence of XT (24%) and ET (9%) with homonymous hemianopia were both much higher than in the general population (1.5% and 5%, respectively). More strabismic eyes pointed to the blind than seeing side (62 vs 41, 60% vs. 40%, p = 0.02). Exotropic eyes were five times more likely to point to the blind side than esotropic eyes (85% vs 15%). Strabismus, especially exotropia, is much more common in pediatric homonymous hemianopia than in the general population. The strabismus is significantly more often in a visual field-expanding direction. These results support an adaptive role for the strabismus. Patients with HH and exotropia or esotropia should be aware that their visual field could be reduced by strabismus surgery.
Sharma M, MacKinnon S, Zurakowski D, Dagi LR. Consecutive superior oblique palsy after adjustable suture spacer surgery for Brown syndrome: incidence and predicting risk. J AAPOS 2018;Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the incidence of and to identify characteristics predicting significant superior oblique palsy (SOP) after adjustable superior oblique suture spacer surgery for treatment of Brown syndrome. METHODS: The medical records of patients treated for unilateral Brown syndrome with adjustable suture spacers (2005-2016) were reviewed to identify possible association of age at surgery, spacer length, surgeon performing procedure, severity of Brown syndrome, preoperative hypotropia in primary position and affected side gaze, and reduction in Brown restriction on postoperative superior oblique function. "Good" postoperative superior oblique function was defined as absence of hypertropia and diplopia in primary position and no more than intermittent diplopia in downgaze comfortably fused with ≤4Δ base-down or head tilt of <10°. Presence of postoperative hypertropia in primary position with increase in downgaze met criteria for significant SOP. Postoperative Brown restriction of ≤ -2 indicated resolution of Brown syndrome. RESULTS: Median age at surgery was 59 months, interquartile range (IQR) was 32-82 months, and median spacer length was 6 mm (range, 2-7 mm) for 19 included patients. Preoperative median hypotropia was 9Δ (IQR, 0Δ-12Δ) in primary position and 18Δ (IQR, 5Δ-22Δ) in affected side gaze. Of 19 patients, 16 (84%) achieved sufficient resolution of Brown syndrome, but 6 (32%) developed significant SOP. Modest preoperative hypotropia in affected side gaze was the only predictor of significant SOP (likelihood ratio test = 7.11; P = 0.008). Logistic regression modeling enabled estimation of risk of significant SOP based on preoperative side gaze hypotropia. CONCLUSIONS: Suture spacer surgery can result in significant SOP. Risk may be predicted by magnitude of preoperative side gaze hypotropia.

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