Retina

Retina Publications

Armstrong GW, Kim LA, Vingopoulos F, Park J, Garg I, Kasetty M, Silverman RF, Zeng R, Douglas VP, Lopera F, Baena A, Giraldo M, Norton D, Cronin-Golomb A, Arboleda-Velasquez JF, Quiroz YT, Miller JB. Retinal Imaging Findings in Carriers With PSEN1-Associated Early-Onset Familial Alzheimer Disease Before Onset of Cognitive Symptoms. JAMA Ophthalmol 2020;Abstract
Importance: Individuals with autosomal dominant mutations for Alzheimer disease are valuable in determining biomarkers present prior to the onset of cognitive decline, improving the ability to diagnose Alzheimer disease as early as possible. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has surfaced as a potential noninvasive technique capable of analyzing central nervous system tissues for biomarkers of Alzheimer disease. Objective: To evaluate whether OCT can detect early retinal alterations in carriers of the presenilin 1 (PSEN1 [OMIM 104311]) E280A mutation who are cognitively unimpaired. Design, Setting, and Participants: A cross-sectional imaging study conducted from July 13, 2015, to September 16, 2020, included 10 carriers of the PSEN1 E280A mutation who were cognitively unimpaired and 10 healthy noncarrier family members, all leveraged from a homogenous Colombian kindred. Statistical analysis was conducted from September 9, 2017, to September 16, 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mixed-effects multiple linear regression was performed to compare the thickness values of the whole retina and individual retinal layers on OCT scans between mutation carriers and noncarriers. Simple linear-effects and mixed-effects multiple linear regression models were used to assess whether age was an effect modifier for PSEN1 mutation of amyloid β levels and retinal thickness, respectively. Fundus photographs were used to compare the number of arterial and venous branch points, arterial and venous tortuosity, and fractal dimension. Results: This study included 10 carriers of the PSEN1 E280A mutation who were cognitively unimpaired (7 women [70%]; mean [SD] age, 36.3 [8.1] years) and 10 healthy noncarrier family members (7 women [70%]; mean [SD] age, 36.4 [8.2] years). Compared with noncarrier controls, PSEN1 mutation carriers who were cognitively unimpaired had a generalized decrease in thickness of the whole retina as well as individual layers detected on OCT scans, with the inner nuclear layer (outer superior quadrant, β = -3.06; P = .007; outer inferior quadrant, β = -2.60; P = .02), outer plexiform layer (outer superior quadrant, β = -3.44; P = .03), and outer nuclear layer (central quadrant, β = -8.61; P = .03; inner nasal quadrant, β = -8.39; P = .04; inner temporal quadrant, β = -9.39; P = .02) showing the greatest amount of statistically significant thinning. Age was a significant effect modifier for the association between PSEN1 mutation and amyloid β levels in cortical regions (β = 0.03; P = .001) but not for the association between PSEN1 mutation and retinal thickness. No statistical difference was detected in any of the vascular parameters studied. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that OCT can detect functional and morphologic changes in the retina of carriers of familial Alzheimer disease who are cognitively unimpaired several years before clinical onset, suggesting that OCT findings and retinal vascular parameters may be biomarkers prior to the onset of cognitive decline.
Sohn EH, Mullins RF, Eliott D. Reply. Retina 2020;40(11):e68-e69.
Wang J, Cui Y, Vingopoulos F, Kasetty M, Silverman RF, Katz R, Kim L, Miller JB. Disorganisation of retinal inner layers is associated with reduced contrast sensitivity in retinal vein occlusion. Br J Ophthalmol 2020;Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: To determine if disorganisation of retinal inner layers (DRIL) is associated with reduced contrast sensitivity (CS) in patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO) with a history of macular oedema (ME). METHODS: Prospective, observational cohort study. Patients with a history of ME secondary to central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) or branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) from October 2017 to July 2019 at a single institution were included. Patients underwent complete ophthalmic examination, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and CS testing using the quick contrast sensitivity function (qCSF) method. Eyes with coexisting macular disease were excluded. SD-OCT images were analysed for presence and extent of DRIL, intraretinal fluid (IRF), subretinal fluid (SRF), hyperreflective foci, epiretinal membrane (ERM), external limiting membrane (ELM) disruption, ellipsoid zone (EZ) disruption, central macular thickness (CMT) and central foveal thickness (CFT). Multivariable mixed-effect linear regressions were performed for the area under the log contrast sensitivity function (AULCSF) using Stata (StataCorp). P values <0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS: 58 visits from 31 patients were included (1.9±1.2 visits per patient). 29 (50%) were for CRVO. The average age was 63.9±10.5 years. On multivariable analysis, DRIL extent (p<0.001), CMT (p=0.007), CFT (p=0.024) and moderate cataract (p=0.001) were significantly associated with worse AULCSF. CONCLUSIONS: DRIL extent is associated with reduced CS in eyes with ME secondary to RVO. DRIL is an imaging feature that has important implications for visual function.
Niu L, Fang Y, Yao X, Zhang Y, Wu J, Chen DF, Sun X. TNFα activates MAPK and Jak-Stat pathways to promote mouse Müller cell proliferation. Exp Eye Res 2020;:108353.Abstract
Mouse Müller cells, considered as dormant retinal progenitors, often respond to retinal injury by undergoing reactive gliosis rather than displaying neural regenerative responses. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a key cytokines induced after injury and implicated in mediating inflammatory and neural regenerative responses in zebrafish. To investigate the involvement of TNFα in mouse retinal injury, adult C57BL/6J mice were subjected to light damage for 14 consecutive days. TNFα was elevated in the retina of mice exposed to light damage, which induced Müller cell proliferation in vitro. Affymetrix microarray showed that, in Müller cells, TNFα induces up-regulation of inflammatory and proliferation-related genes, including NFKB2, leukemia inhibitory factor, interleukin-6, janus kinase (Jak) 1, Jak2, signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 1, Stat2, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 7, and MAP4K4 but down-regulation of neuroprogenitor genes, including Sox9, Ascl1, Wnt2 and Hes1. Blocking the Jak/Stat and MAPK pathways attenuated TNFα-induced Müller cell proliferation. These results suggest that TNFα may drive the proliferation and inflammatory response, rather than the neural regenerative potential, of mouse Müller cells.
Ambrosio L, Williams JS, Gutierrez A, Swanson EA, Munro RJ, Ferguson DR, Fulton AB, Akula JD. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition in X-linked retinoschisis: An eye on the photoreceptors. Exp Eye Res 2020;:108344.Abstract
The retinoschisin protein is encoded on the short arm of the X-chromosome by RS1, is expressed abundantly in photoreceptor inner segments and in bipolar cells, and is secreted as an octamer that maintains the structural integrity of the retina. Mutations in RS1 lead to X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), a disease characterized by the formation of cystic spaces between boys' retinal layers that frequently present in ophthalmoscopy as a "spoke-wheel" pattern on their maculae and by progressively worsening visual acuity (VA). There is no proven therapy for XLRS, but there is mixed evidence that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) produce multiple beneficial effects, including improved VA and decreased volume of cystic spaces. Consequently, linear mixed-effects (LME) models were used to evaluate the effects of CAI therapy on VA and central retinal thickness (CRT, a proxy for cystic cavity volume) in a review of 19 patients' records. The mechanism of action of action of CAIs is unclear but given that misplaced retinoschisin might accumulate in the photoreceptors, it is possible-perhaps even likely-that CAIs act to benefit the function of photoreceptors and the neighboring retinal pigment epithelium by acidification of the extracellular milieu; patients on CAIs have among the most robust photoreceptor responses. Therefore, a small subset of five subjects were recruited for imaging on a custom multimodal adaptive optics retinal imager for inspection of their parafoveal cone photoreceptors. Those cones that were visible, which numbered far fewer than in controls, were enlarged, consistent with the retinoschisin accumulation hypothesis. Results of the LME modeling found that there is an initial benefit to both VA and CRT in CAI therapy, but these wane, in both cases, after roughly two years. That said, even a short beneficial effect of CAIs on the volume of the cystic spaces may give CAI therapy an important role as pretreatment before (or immediately following) administration of gene therapy.
Han H, Yang Y, Wu Z, Liu B, Dong L, Deng H, Tian J, Lei H. Capilliposide B blocks VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Biomed Pharmacother 2020;133:110999.Abstract
Abnormal angiogenesis is associated with intraocular diseases such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration, and current therapies for these eye diseases are not satisfactory. The purpose of this study was to determine whether capilliposide B (CPS-B), a novel oleanane triterpenoid saponin derived from Lysimachia capillipes Hemsl, can inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis signaling events and cellular responses in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs). Our study revealed that the capilliposide B IC for HRECs was 8.5 μM at 72 h and that 1 μM capilliposide B specifically inhibited VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling enzymes Akt and Erk. In addition, we discovered that this chemical effectively blocked VEGF-stimulated proliferation, migration and tube formation of the HRECs, suggesting that capilliposide B is a promising prophylactic for angiogenesis-associated diseases such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy.
Rossin EJ, Tsui I, Wong SC, Hou KK, Prakhunhungsit S, Blair MP, Shapiro MJ, Leishman L, Nagiel A, Lifton JA, Quiram P, Ringeisen AL, Henderson RH, Arruti N, Buzzacco DM, Kusaka S, Ferrone PJ, Belin PJ, Chang E, Hubschman J-P, Murray TG, Leung EH, Wu W-C, Olsen KR, Harper AC, Rahmani S, Goldstein J, Lee T, Nudleman E, Cernichiaro-Espinosa LA, Chhablani J, Berrocal AM, Yonekawa Y. Traumatic retinal detachment in patients with self-injurious behavior: an international multicenter study. Ophthalmol Retina 2020;Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the clinical characteristics, surgical outcomes and management recommendations in patients with traumatic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) due to self-injurious behavior (SIB). DESIGN: International, multicenter, retrospective, interventional case series. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with SIB from 23 centers with RRD in at least one eye. METHODS: Clinical histories, pre-operative assessment, surgical details, post-operative management, behavioral intervention and follow-up examination were reviewed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The rate of single surgery anatomic success (SSAS) was the primary outcome. Other outcomes included new RRD in formerly attached eyes, final retinal reattachment and final visual acuity. RESULTS: A total of 107 eyes with RRDs were included from 78 patients. Fifty-four percent of patients had bilateral RRD or phthisis bulbi in the fellow eye at final follow-up. The mean age at presentation was 15.7 ±11.4 years and 73.1% were male. The most common systemic diagnoses related to SIB were autism spectrum disorder (35.9%), trisomy 21 (21.8%), cognitive impairment (12.8%) and cerebral palsy (12.8%). The most common behaviors were face hitting (74.4%), eye rubbing (25.6%) and head banging (16.7%). The average follow-up time was 3.3±2.8 years, and surgical outcomes for operable eyes were restricted to patients with at least 3 months of followup (81 eyes). Primary initial surgeries were vitrectomy alone (33.3%), primary scleral buckle (SB) (25.9%) and vitrectomy with SB (39.7%), and 5 prophylactic SBs were placed. Twenty-three eyes (21.5%) with RRDs were deemed inoperable. The single surgery anatomic success rate (SSAS) was 23.1% without tamponade (37.2% if including silicone oil), and final reattachment was attained in 80% (36.3% without silicone oil tamponade). Funnel-configured RRD (P=0.006) and the presence of grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy (P=0.002) predicted RRDs that were more likely to fail reattachment (P=0.04 and P=0.05, respectively, if restricting to the 64 patients with ≥12 months followup). The use of a SB predicted final attachment rate during the initial surgery (P=0.005) or at any surgery (p=0.008; P=0.012 and 0.002, respectively, if restricting to patients with ≥12 months followup). Anatomic reattachment correlated with better visual acuity (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: RRD from SIB poses therapeutic challenges due to limited patient cooperation, bilateral involvement, chronic RRDs, and ongoing trauma in a vulnerable and neglected patient population. The surgical success rates in this study were some of the lowest in the modern retinal detachment literature. The use of a SB may result in better outcomes, and visual function can be restored in some patients.
Hicks PM, Haaland B, Feehan M, Crandall AS, Pettey JH, Nuttall E, Self W, Hartnett ME, Bernstein P, Vitale A, Shakoor A, Shulman JP, Sieminski SF, Kim I, Owen LA, Murtaugh MA, Noyes A, Deangelis MM. Systemic Disease and Ocular Comorbidity Analysis of Geographically Isolated Federally Recognized American Indian Tribes of the Intermountain West. J Clin Med 2020;9(11)Abstract
BACKGROUND: The American Indian Navajo and Goshute peoples are underserved patient populations residing in the Four Corners area of the United States and Ibupah, Utah, respectively. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of epidemiological factors and lipid biomarkers that may be associated with type II diabetes, hypertension and retinal manifestations in tribal and non-tribal members in the study areas (n = 146 participants). We performed multivariate analyses to determine which, if any, risk factors were unique at the tribal level. Fundus photos and epidemiological data through standardized questionnaires were collected. Blood samples were collected to analyze lipid biomarkers. Univariate analyses were conducted and statistically significant factors at < 0.10 were entered into a multivariate regression. RESULTS: Of 51 participants for whom phenotyping was available, from the Four Corners region, 31 had type II diabetes (DM), 26 had hypertension and 6 had diabetic retinopathy (DR). Of the 64 participants from Ibupah with phenotyping available, 20 had diabetes, 19 had hypertension and 6 had DR. Navajo participants were less likely to have any type of retinopathy as compared to Goshute participants (odds ratio (OR) = 0.059; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.016-0.223; < 0.001). Associations were found between diabetes and hypertension in both populations. Older age was associated with hypertension in the Four Corners, and the Navajo that reside there on the reservation, but not within the Goshute and Ibupah populations. Combining both the Ibupah, Utah and Four Corners study populations, being American Indian ( = 0.022), residing in the Four Corners ( = 0.027) and having hypertension ( < 0.001) increased the risk of DM. DM ( < 0.001) and age ( = 0.002) were significantly associated with hypertension in both populations examined. When retinopathy was evaluated for both populations combined, hypertension ( = 0.037) and living in Ibupah ( < 0.001) were associated with greater risk of retinopathy. When combining both American Indian populations from the Four Corners and Ibupah, those with hypertension were more likely to have DM ( < 0.001). No lipid biomarkers were found to be significantly associated with any disease state. CONCLUSIONS: We found different comorbid factors with retinal disease outcome between the two tribes that reside within the Intermountain West. This is indicated by the association of tribe and with the type of retinopathy outcome when we combined the populations of American Indians. Overall, the Navajo peoples and the Four Corners had a higher prevalence of chronic disease that included diabetes and hypertension than the Goshutes and Ibupah. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to conduct an analysis for disease outcomes exclusively including the Navajo and Goshute tribe of the Intermountain West.
Monés J, Srivastava SK, Jaffe GJ, Tadayoni R, Albini TA, Kaiser PK, Holz FG, Korobelnik J-F, Kim IK, Pruente C, Murray TG, Heier JS. Risk of inflammation, retinal vasculitis and retinal occlusion-related events with brolucizumab: post-hoc review of HAWK and HARRIER. Ophthalmology 2020;Abstract
OBJECTIVE: An independent Safety Review Committee (SRC; supported by Novartis Pharma AG [Basel, Switzerland]) analyzed investigator-reported cases of intraocular inflammation (IOI), endophthalmitis and retinal arterial occlusion in the phase 3 HAWK and HARRIER trials of brolucizumab versus aflibercept in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). DESIGN: A post-hoc analysis of a subset of data from two 2-year, double-masked, multicenter, active-controlled randomized phase 3 trials (NCT02307682, NCT02434328). PARTICIPANTS: Patients (N=1817) with untreated, active choroidal neovascularization due to AMD in the study eye were randomized and treated in HAWK/HARRIER. The SRC reviewed data from cases of investigator-reported IOI (60/1088 brolucizumab-treated eyes; 8/729 aflibercept-treated eyes). METHODS: The SRC received details and images (color fundus photography, fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography) for all investigator-determined cases of IOI, retinal arterial occlusion and endophthalmitis. Cases were reviewed in detail by ≥2 readers, then adjudicated by the SRC as a group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Within this subset of patients: incidence of IOI, signs and incidence of retinal vasculitis and/or retinal vascular occlusion, and visual acuity loss; time since first brolucizumab injection to IOI event onset; frequency of visual acuity loss following brolucizumab injection by time of first IOI event onset. RESULTS: Fifty brolucizumab-treated eyes were considered to have definite/probable drug-related events within the spectrum of IOI, retinal vasculitis and/or vascular occlusion. Based on these cases, incidence of definite/probable IOI was 4.6% (IOI + vasculitis, 3.3%; IOI + vasculitis + occlusion, 2.1%). There were 8 cases (incidence 0.74%) of at least moderate visual acuity loss (≥15 ETDRS letters) in eyes with IOI; 7 were in eyes with IOI + vasculitis + occlusion. Of the 8 cases, 5 experienced their first IOI-related event within 3 months of the first brolucizumab injection (increasing to 7/8 within 6 months). Incidence of IOI in aflibercept-treated eyes was 1.1%, with at least moderate visual acuity loss in 0.14%. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis of IOI cases following brolucizumab injection identified signs of retinal vasculitis with or without retinal vascular occlusion, and an associated risk of visual acuity loss. The findings will help physicians to evaluate the risks and benefits of brolucizumab treatment for nAMD.
Sun Y, Smith LEH. Notice of Withdrawal: Retinal Vasculature in Development and Diseases. Annu Rev Vis Sci 2020;Abstract
This article was withdrawn on October 15, 2020, at the request of the journal editors, with agreement from the authors, owing to a substantial amount of unattributed or improperly cited text overlap with other sources. In accordance with Annual Reviews' commitment to transparency, the original PDF of the article remains available for download at .
Solaguren-Beascoa M, Bujakowska KM, Méjécase C, Emmenegger L, Orhan E, Neuillé M, Mohand-Saïd S, Condroyer C, Lancelot M-E, Michiels C, Demontant V, Antonio A, Letexier M, Saraiva J-P, Lonjou C, Carpentier W, Léveillard T, Pierce EA, Dollfus H, Sahel J-A, Bhattacharya SS, Audo I, Zeitz C. WDR34, a candidate gene for non-syndromic rod-cone dystrophy. Clin Genet 2020;Abstract
Rod-cone dystrophy (RCD), also called Retinitis Pigmentosa, is characterized by rod followed by cone photoreceptor degeneration, leading to gradual visual loss. Mutations in over 65 genes have been associated with non-syndromic RCD explaining 60-70% of cases, with novel gene defects possibly accounting for the unsolved cases. Homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing applied to a case of autosomal recessive non-syndromic RCD from a consanguineous union identified a homozygous variant in WDR34. Mutations in WDR34 have been previously associated with severe ciliopathy syndromes possibly associated with a retinal dystrophy. This is the first report of a homozygous mutation in WDR34 associated with non-syndromic RCD.
Zhang Y, Wang K, Pan J, Yang S, Yao H, Li M, Li H, Lei H, Jin H, Wang F. Exosomes mediate an epithelial-mesenchymal transition cascade in retinal pigment epithelial cells: Implications for proliferative vitreoretinopathy. J Cell Mol Med 2020;Abstract
Exosomes have recently emerged as a pivotal mediator of many physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of exosomes in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) has not been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of exosomes in PVR. Transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFß-2) was used to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, as an in vitro model of PVR. Exosomes from normal and EMTed RPE cells were extracted and identified. We incubated extracted exosomes with recipient RPE cells, and co-cultured EMTed RPE cells and recipient RPE cells in the presence of the exosome inhibitor GW4869. Both experiments suggested that there are further EMT-promoting effects of exosomes from EMTed RPE cells. MicroRNA sequencing was also performed to identify the miRNA profiles in exosomes from both groups. We identified 34 differentially expressed exosomal miRNAs (P <. 05). Importantly, miR-543 was found in exosomes from EMTed RPE cells, and miR-543-enriched exosomes significantly induced the EMT of recipient RPE cells. Our study demonstrates that exosomal miRNA is differentially expressed in RPE cells during EMT and that these exosomal miRNAs may play pivotal roles in EMT induction. Our results highlight the importance of exosomes as cellular communicators within the microenvironment of PVR.
Maidana DE, Notomi S, Ueta T, Zhou T, Joseph D, Kosmidou C, Caminal-Mitjana JM, Miller JW, Vavvas DG. ThicknessTool: automated ImageJ retinal layer thickness and profile in digital images. Sci Rep 2020;10(1):18459.Abstract
To develop an automated retina layer thickness measurement tool for the ImageJ platform, to quantitate nuclear layers following the retina contour. We developed the ThicknessTool (TT), an automated thickness measurement plugin for the ImageJ platform. To calibrate TT, we created a calibration dataset of mock binary skeletonized mask images with increasing thickness masks and different rotations. Following, we created a training dataset and performed an agreement analysis of thickness measurements between TT and two masked manual observers. Finally, we tested the performance of TT measurements in a validation dataset of retinal detachment images. In the calibration dataset, there were no differences in layer thickness between measured and known thickness masks, with an overall coefficient of variation of 0.00%. Training dataset measurements of immunofluorescence retina nuclear layers disclosed no significant differences between TT and any observer's average outer nuclear layer (ONL) (p = 0.998), inner nuclear layer (INL) (p = 0.807), and ONL/INL ratio (p = 0.944) measurements. Agreement analysis showed that bias between TT vs. observers' mean was lower than between any observers' mean against each other in the ONL (0.77 ± 0.34 µm vs 3.25 ± 0.33 µm) and INL (1.59 ± 0.28 µm vs 2.82 ± 0.36 µm). Validation dataset showed that TT can detect significant and true ONL thinning (p = 0.006), more sensitive than manual measurement capabilities (p = 0.069). ThicknessTool can measure retina nuclear layers thickness in a fast, accurate, and precise manner with multi-platform capabilities. In addition, the TT can be customized to user preferences and is freely available to download.
Shire DB, Gingerich MD, Wong PI, Skvarla M, Cogan SF, Chen J, Wang W, Rizzo JF. Micro-Fabrication of Components for a High-Density Sub-Retinal Visual Prosthesis. Micromachines (Basel) 2020;11(10)Abstract
We present a retrospective of unique micro-fabrication problems and solutions that were encountered through over 10 years of retinal prosthesis product development, first for the Boston Retinal Implant Project initiated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at Harvard Medical School's teaching hospital, the Massachusetts Eye and Ear-and later at the startup company Bionic Eye Technologies, by some of the same personnel. These efforts culminated in the fabrication and assembly of 256+ channel visual prosthesis devices having flexible multi-electrode arrays that were successfully implanted sub-retinally in mini-pig animal models as part of our pre-clinical testing program. We report on the processing of the flexible multi-layered, planar and penetrating high-density electrode arrays, surgical tools for sub-retinal implantation, and other parts such as coil supports that facilitated the implantation of the peri-ocular device components. We begin with an overview of the implantable portion of our visual prosthesis system design, and describe in detail the micro-fabrication methods for creating the parts of our system that were assembled outside of our hermetically-sealed electronics package. We also note the unique surgical challenges that sub-retinal implantation of our micro-fabricated components presented, and how some of those issues were addressed through design, materials selection, and fabrication approaches.
Kumar V, Ali Shariati M, Mesentier-Louro L, Jinsook Oh A, Russano K, Goldberg JL, Liao YJ. Dual Specific Phosphatase 14 Deletion Rescues Retinal Ganglion Cells and Optic Nerve Axons after Experimental Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy. Curr Eye Res 2020;:1-9.Abstract
PURPOSE: Understanding molecular changes is essential for designing effective treatments for nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), the most common acute optic neuropathy in adults older than 50 years. We investigated changes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway after experimental AION and focused on dual specificity phosphatase 14 (Dusp14), an atypical MAPK phosphatase that is downstream of Krüppel-like transcription factor (KLF) 9-mediated inhibition of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal regeneration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We induced severe AION in a photochemical thrombosis model in adult C57BL/6 wild-type and Dusp14 knockout mice. For comparison, some studies were performed using an optic nerve crush model. We assessed changes in MAPK pathway molecules using Western blot and immunohistochemistry, measured retinal thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and quantified RGCs and axons using histologic methods. RESULTS: Three days after severe AION, there was no change in the retinal protein levels of MAPK ERK1/2, phosphorylated-ERK1/2 (pERK1/2), downstream effector Elk-1 and phosphatase Dusp14 on Western blot. Western blot analysis of purified RGCs after a more severe model using optic nerve crush also showed no change in Dusp14 protein expression. Because of the known importance of the Dusp14 and MAPK pathway in RGCs, we examined changes after AION in Dusp14 knockout mice. Three days after AION, Dusp14 knockout mice had significantly increased pERK1/2, Brn3A RGCs on immunohistochemistry. Three weeks after AION, Dusp14 knockout mice had significantly greater preservation of retinal thickness, increased number of Brn3A RGCs on whole mount preparation, and increased number of optic nerve axons compared with wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic deletion of Dusp14, a MAPK phosphatase important in KFL9-mediated inhibition of RGC survival, led to increased activation of MAPK ERK1/2 and greater RGC and axonal survival after experimental AION. Inhibiting Dusp14 or activating the MAPK pathway should be examined further as a potential therapeutic approach to treatment of AION. AION: anterior ischemic optic neuropathy; Dusp14: dual specific phosphatase 14; ERK1/2: extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2; Elk-1: ETS Like-1 protein; GCC: ganglion cell complex; GCL: ganglion cell layer; inner nuclear layer; KO: knockout; MAPK: mitogen-activated phosphokinase; OCT: optical coherence tomography; RGC: retinal ganglion cell; RNFL: retinal nerve fiber layer.

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