Pediatric Ophthalmology

Pediatric Ophthalmology Publications

Saldaris J, Weisenberg J, Pestana-Knight E, Marsh ED, Suter B, Rajaraman R, Heidary G, Olson HE, Devinsky O, Price D, Jacoby P, Leonard H, Benke TA, Demarest S, Downs J. Content Validation of Clinician-Reported Items for a Severity Measure for CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder. J Child Neurol 2021;:8830738211019576.Abstract
CDKL5 deficiency disorder (CDD) results in early-onset seizures and severe developmental impairments. A CDD clinical severity assessment (CCSA) was previously developed with clinician and parent-report items to capture information on a range of domains. Consistent with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines, content validation is the first step in evaluating the psychometric properties of an outcome measure. The aim of this study was to validate the content of the clinician-reported items in the CCSA (CCSA-Clinician). Eight neurologists leading the USA CDD Center of Excellence clinics were interviewed using the "think aloud" technique to critique 26 clinician-reported items. Common themes were aggregated, and a literature search of related assessments informed item modifications. The clinicians then participated in 2 consensus meetings to review themes and finalize the items. A consensus was achieved for the content of the CCSA-Clinician. Eight of the original items were omitted, 11 items were added, and the remaining 18 items were revised. The final 29 items were classified into 2 domains: functioning and neurologic impairments. This study enabled refinement of the CCSA-Clinician and provided evidence for its content validity. This preliminary validation is essential before field testing and further validation, in order to advance the instrument toward clinical trial readiness.
Chinn RN, Michalak SM, Shoshany TN, Bishop K, Staffa SJ, Hunter DG. Effect of Sequential and Simultaneous Patching Regimens in Unilateral Amblyopia. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: Many clinicians treat unilateral amblyopia with glasses alone and initiate patching when needed; others start glasses and patching simultaneously. In this study, we reviewed the outcomes of the two approaches at our institution. DESIGN: Retrospective non-randomized clinical trial METHODS: Setting: Institutional practice. PATIENT POPULATION: All patients diagnosed with amblyopia at Boston Children's Hospital between 2010 and 2014. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Unilateral amblyopia visual acuity (VA): 20/40-20/200 with interocular difference ≥ 3 lines, age 3-12 years, with a 6-month visit. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Deprivation amblyopia, prior amblyopia treatment, treatment other than patching, surgery. Patients were categorized as "simultaneous treatment" (concurrent glasses and patching therapy at their first visit) or "sequential treatment" (glasses alone at first visit followed by patching therapy at second visit.) Observation Procedures: Patient demographics, VA, and stereopsis were compared. OUTCOME MEASURES: VA and stereopsis at the last visit on treatment. RESULTS: We identified 98 patients who met inclusion criteria: 36 received simultaneous treatment and 62 sequential treatment. Median amblyopic eye VA improved similarly between the simultaneous (∆0.40 (0.56, 0.30 logMAR) and sequential (∆0.40 (0.52, 0.27 logMAR) groups. Patients without stereopsis at first visit had better stereopsis outcomes with sequential treatment (5.12 (4.00, 7.51) log stereopsis) compared to simultaneous treatment (8.01 (5.65, 9.21) log stereopsis, p ≤ 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: VA improved approximately 4 lines regardless of treatment type. For children without stereopsis at first presentation, sequential patching yielded better stereopsis outcomes. These findings require further validation and highlight the importance of evaluating stereopsis in future studies.
Elhusseiny AM, Bishop K, Staffa SJ, Zurakowski D, Hunter DG, Mantagos IS. Virtual reality prototype for binocular therapy in older children and adults with amblyopia. J AAPOS 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the best-corrected visual acuity and stereoacuity gains in children >7 years of age and adults with unilateral amblyopia treated with a prototype virtual reality-based binocular amblyopia therapy. METHODS: In this randomized, double masked, cross-in clinical trial, patients at Boston Children's Hospital with unilateral anisometropic and/or strabismic amblyopia and history of prior amblyopia treatment failure were randomized to either a full-treatment group (8 weeks of binocular treatment using therapeutic software application in virtual reality headset) or a sham-crossover group (4 weeks of sham treatment followed by 4 weeks of binocular treatment). Amblyopic eye visual acuity and stereoacuity were evaluated at 4, 8, and 16 weeks' follow-up. RESULTS: The study cohort included 20 participants (10 females), with a median age of 9 years (range, 7-38 years). In the full-treatment group (11 patients), the mean amblyopic eye logMAR visual acuity at 16 weeks was 0.49 ± 0.26, compared with 0.47 ± 0.20 at baseline. In the sham-crossover group, it was 0.51 ± 0.18 at 16 weeks, compared with 0.53 ± 0.21 at baseline. Stereoacuity (log arcsec) was significantly improved, from 7.3 ± 2 at baseline to 6.6 ± 2.3 at 8 weeks (P < 0.001) and 6.7 ± 2.6 at 16 weeks (P < 0.001). No significant adverse events (diplopia, asthenopia, or worsening strabismus) were noted in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Although the virtual reality-based prototype for binocular amblyopia therapy did not significantly improve visual acuity in the amblyopic eyes of older children and adults, stereoacuity did significantly improve compared with baseline; improvements were clinically minute. However, larger studies are required to confirm the results.
Maleki A, Anesi SD, Look-Why S, Manhapra A, Foster SC. Pediatric uveitis: A comprehensive review. Surv Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
Pediatric uveitis accounts for 5-10% of all uveitis. Uveitis in children differs from adult uveitis in that it is commonly asymptomatic and can become chronic and cause chronic damage to ocular structures. The diagnosis might be delayed for multiple reasons, including the preverbal age and difficulties in examining young children. Pediatric uveitis may be infectious or non-infectious in etiology. The etiology of non-infectious uveitis is presumed to be autoimmune or autoinflammatory. The most common causes of uveitis in this age group are idiopathic and juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis. The stepladder approach for the treatment of pediatric uveitis is based on expert opinion and algorithms proposed by multidisciplinary panels. Uveitis morbidities in pediatric patients include cataract, glaucoma, and amblyopia. Pediatric patients with uveitis should be frequently examined until remission is achieved. Once in remission, the interval between follow-up visits can be extended; however, it is recommended that even after remission the child should be seen every 8-12 weeks depending on the history of uveitis and the medications used. Close follow up is also necessary as uveitis can flare up during immunomodulatory therapy. It is crucial to measure the impact of uveitis, it's treatment, and it's complications on the child and the child's family. Visual acuity can be considered as an acceptable criterion for assessing visual function. Additionally, the number of cells in the anterior chamber can be a measure of disease activity. We review different aspects of pediatric uveitis. We discuss the mechanisms of noninfectious uveitis, including autoimmune and autoinflammatory etiologies, and the risks of developing uveitis in children with systemic rheumatologic diseases. We address the risk factors for developing morbidities, the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) criteria for timing and anatomical classifications and describe a stepladder approach in the treatment of pediatric uveitis based on expert opinion and algorithms proposed by multi-disciplinary panels. We describe the most common entities for each type of anatomical classification and complications of uveitis for the pediatric population. Additionally, we address monitoring of children with uveitis and evaluation of Quality of Life.
Elhusseiny AM, Jabroun M, Rajabi F, Gonzalez E, Alkharashi M. A novel variant in the TSPAN12 gene-presenting as unilateral myopia, pediatric cataract, and heterochromia in a patient with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. Eur J Ophthalmol 2021;:11206721211027415.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report a case of 16-month-old boy with a novel variant TSPAN12 gene-presenting as unilateral myopia, pediatric cataract, and heterochromia in a patient with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. OBSERVATION: A 16-month-old otherwise healthy boy was referred to Boston Children's Hospital for evaluation of strabismus. Ocular examination revealed intermittent esotropia, left hypotropia, and limited left eye elevation in both adduction and abduction. Full cycloplegic hyperopic correction of +3.50 diopters (D) over both eyes was given to the patient. Over several months, refraction of the right eye showed progressive myopia (-6.00 D) with new onset iris heterochromia. Fundus examination showed there was a large area of chorioretinal atrophy with abrupt ending of the blood vessels; anterior to the ora serrata there were diffuse vitreous bands and veils that reached the lens anteriorly in direct contact with the lenticular opacity. A novel heterozygous nonsense likely pathogenic variant was identified in the TSPAN12 gene (NM_012338.3) c.315T>A (p.Cys105Ter) confirming the diagnosis of FEVR. CONCLUSION AND IMPORTANCE: Asymmetric FEVR rarely present with unilateral axial myopia however association with acquired heterochromia and cataract has never been reported. We report a case of FEVR caused by a novel TSPAN12 likely pathogenic nonsense variant presenting as unilateral progressive myopia, acquired heterochromia, and pediatric cataract.
Chang MY, Morrison DG, Binenbaum G, Heidary G, Trivedi RH, Galvin JA, Pineles SL. Home- and Office-Based Vergence and Accommodative Therapies for Treatment of Convergence Insufficiency in Children and Young Adults: A Report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To review home- and office-based vergence and accommodative therapies for treatment of convergence insufficiency (CI) in children and young adults up to 35 years of age. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted through October 2020 in the PubMed database for English-language studies. The combined searches yielded 359 abstracts, of which 37 were reviewed in full text. Twelve of these were considered appropriate for inclusion in this assessment and assigned a level of evidence rating by the panel methodologist. RESULTS: Of the 12 studies included in this assessment, 8 were graded as level I evidence, 2 were graded as level II evidence, and 2 were graded as level III evidence. Two of the level I studies included older teenagers and young adults; the remainder of the studies exclusively evaluated children. Two randomized controlled trials found that office-based vergence and accommodative therapies were effective in improving motor outcomes in children with symptomatic CI. However, the studies reported conflicting results on the efficacy of office-based therapy for treating symptoms of CI. Data were inconclusive regarding the effectiveness of home-based therapies (including pencil push-ups and home computer therapy) compared with home placebo. In young adults, office-based vergence and accommodative therapies were not superior to placebo in relieving symptoms of CI. CONCLUSIONS: Level I evidence suggests that office-based vergence and accommodative therapies improve motor outcomes in children with symptomatic CI, although data are inconsistent regarding symptomatic relief. Evidence is insufficient to determine whether home-based therapies are effective.
Elhusseiny AM, VanderVeen DK. Optical coherence tomography in the setting of optic nerve head cupping reversal in secondary childhood glaucoma. J AAPOS 2021;Abstract
Reversal of optic nerve head (ONH) cupping has been considered an important clinical observation that signals surgical success and control of intraocular pressure (IOP) in childhood glaucoma. Many theories based on elasticity of pediatric eyes have been proposed, including anterior movement of the elastic lamina cribrosa or shrinkage of the scleral canal. The relationship between these factors and axonal loss is unclear when reversal of cupping has been observed. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) optical coherence tomography (OCT) can help to clarify this. We present a case series of 4 pediatric patients with secondary glaucoma that demonstrated ONH cupping reversal with pre- and postoperative clinical images and RNFL OCT.
Pivodic A, Johansson H, Smith LEH, Hård A-L, Löfqvist C, Yoder BA, Hartnett EM, Wu C, Bründer M-C, Lagrèze WA, Stahl A, Al-Hawasi A, Larsson E, Lundgren P, Gränse L, Sunnqvist B, Tornqvist K, Wallin A, Holmström G, Albertsson-Wikland K, Nilsson S, Hellström A. Development and validation of a new clinical decision support tool to optimize screening for retinopathy of prematurity. Br J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Prematurely born infants undergo costly, stressful eye examinations to uncover the small fraction with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) that needs treatment to prevent blindness. The aim was to develop a prediction tool (DIGIROP-Screen) with 100% sensitivity and high specificity to safely reduce screening of those infants not needing treatment. DIGIROP-Screen was compared with four other ROP models based on longitudinal weights. METHODS: Data, including infants born at 24-30 weeks of gestational age (GA), for DIGIROP-Screen development (DevGroup, N=6991) originate from the Swedish National Registry for ROP. Three international cohorts comprised the external validation groups (ValGroups, N=1241). Multivariable logistic regressions, over postnatal ages (PNAs) 6-14 weeks, were validated. Predictors were birth characteristics, status and age at first diagnosed ROP and essential interactions. RESULTS: ROP treatment was required in 287 (4.1%)/6991 infants in DevGroup and 49 (3.9%)/1241 in ValGroups. To allow 100% sensitivity in DevGroup, specificity at birth was 53.1% and cumulatively 60.5% at PNA 8 weeks. Applying the same cut-offs in ValGroups, specificities were similar (46.3% and 53.5%). One infant with severe malformations in ValGroups was incorrectly classified as not needing screening. For all other infants, at PNA 6-14 weeks, sensitivity was 100%. In other published models, sensitivity ranged from 88.5% to 100% and specificity ranged from 9.6% to 45.2%. CONCLUSIONS: DIGIROP-Screen, a clinical decision support tool using readily available birth and ROP screening data for infants born GA 24-30 weeks, in the European and North American populations tested can safely identify infants not needing ROP screening. DIGIROP-Screen had equal or higher sensitivity and specificity compared with other models. DIGIROP-Screen should be tested in any new cohort for validation and if not validated it can be modified using the same statistical approaches applied to a specific clinical setting.
Shoshany TN, Chinn RN, Staffa SJ, Bishop K, Michalak S, Hunter DG. Identifying Characteristics Predictive of Lost-to-follow-up (LTFU) Status in Amblyopia. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To identify demographic and disease-related characteristics predictive of LTFU status in amblyopia treatment and create a risk model for predicting LTFU status. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study METHODS: Setting: Single center, ophthalmology department at Boston Children's Hospital (BCH). PATIENTS: 2037 patients treated for amblyopia at BCH between 2010-2014. OBSERVATION PROCEDURE: LTFU was defined as patients who did not return after initial visit, excluding those who came for second opinion. Multiple variables were tested for association with LTFU status. OUTCOME MEASURE: Odds ratio of LTFU risk associated with each variable. Multivariate logistic regression was used to create a risk score for predicting LTFU status. RESULTS: A large proportion of patients (23%) were LTFU after first visit. Older age, non-white race, lack of insurance, previous glasses or atropine treatment, and longer requested follow-up intervals were independent predictors of LTFU status. A multivariable risk score was created to predict probability of LTFU (AUC 0.68). CONCLUSIONS: Our comprehensive amblyopia database allows us to predict which patients are more likely to be LTFU after baseline visit, and develop strategies to mitigate these effects. These findings may help with practice efficiency and improve patient outcomes in the future by transitioning these analyses to an electronic medical record that could be programmed to provide continually updated decision support for individual patients based on large datasets.
Godfrey D, Torres A, Heidary G, Zahoor H, Lee A, Berry G, Engle E. A 7-year old female with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, Duane retraction syndrome, and Marcus Gunn phenomenon due to a ZC4H2 gene mutation: a clinical presentation of the Wieacker-Wolff syndrome. Ophthalmic Genet 2021;:1-3.Abstract
Background: Duane retraction syndrome and arthrogryposis multiplex congenita have an incidence of approximately 1:1500-1:3000 live births. However, the association of these two entities with a Marcus-Gunn might be a rare and, until now, under-recognized clinical presentation of the Wieacker-Wolff Syndrome.Patient and methods: We report a 7-year-old female with dysmorphic features, global developmental delay, arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), and unilateral Marcus Gunn jaw winking.Results: Whole Exome Sequencing showed a de novo premature stop codon in ZC4H2. Extensive genetic and metabolic work was negative otherwise and Brain MRI showed delayed non-specific myelination abnormalities. She continues to have significant delays but does not have regression, seizures or other neurological complications. She has required a multidisciplinary approach for the management of her multiple contractures.Conclusion: This case confirms ZC4H2 as a cause of syndromic DRS and extends the ZC4H2 phenotype to include Marcus Gunn jaw winking.
Oke I, Vanderveen D. Machine Learning Applications in Pediatric Ophthalmology. Semin Ophthalmol 2021;36(4):210-217.Abstract
Purpose : To describe emerging applications of machine learning (ML) in pediatric ophthalmology with an emphasis on the diagnosis and treatment of disorders affecting visual development. Methods : Literature review of studies applying ML algorithms to problems in pediatric ophthalmology. Results : At present, the ML literature emphasizes applications in retinopathy of prematurity. However, there are increasing efforts to apply ML techniques in the diagnosis of amblyogenic conditions such as pediatric cataracts, strabismus, and high refractive error. Conclusions : A greater understanding of the principles governing ML will enable pediatric eye care providers to apply the methodology to unexplored challenges within the subspecialty.

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