Pediatric Ophthalmology

Pediatric Ophthalmology Publications

Finkelstein JB, Tremblay ES, Van Cain M, Farber-Chen A, Schumann C, Brown C, Shah AS, Rhodes ET. Pediatric Clinicians' Use of Telemedicine: Qualitative Interview Study. JMIR Hum Factors 2021;8(4):e29941.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Bedside manner describes how clinicians relate to patients in person. Telemedicine allows clinicians to connect virtually with patients using digital tools. Effective virtual communication or webside manner may require modifications to traditional bedside manner. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to understand the experiences of telemedicine providers with patient-to-provider virtual visits and communication with families at a single large-volume children's hospital to inform program development and training for future clinicians. METHODS: A total of 2 focus groups of pediatric clinicians (N=11) performing virtual visits before the COVID-19 pandemic, with a range of experiences and specialties, were engaged to discuss experiential, implementation, and practice-related issues. Focus groups were facilitated using a semistructured guide covering general experience, preparedness, rapport strategies, and suggestions. Sessions were digitally recorded, and the corresponding transcripts were reviewed for data analysis. The transcripts were coded based on the identified main themes and subthemes. On the basis of a higher-level analysis of these codes, the study authors generated a final set of key themes to describe the collected data. RESULTS: Theme consistency was identified across diverse participants, although individual clinician experiences were influenced by their specialties and practices. A total of 3 key themes emerged regarding the development of best practices, barriers to scalability, and establishing patient rapport. Issues and concerns related to privacy were salient across all themes. Clinicians felt that telemedicine required new skills for patient interaction, and not all were comfortable with their training. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine provides benefits as well as challenges to health care delivery. In interprofessional focus groups, pediatric clinicians emphasized the importance of considering safety and privacy to promote rapport and webside manner when conducting virtual visits. The inclusion of webside manner instructions within training curricula is crucial as telemedicine becomes an established modality for providing health care.
Warkad VU, Hunter DG, Dagi AF, MacKinnon S, Kazlas MA, Heidary G, Staffa SJ, Dagi LR. Impact of Adding Augmented Superior Rectus Transpositions to Medial Rectus Muscle Recessions When Treating Esotropic Moebius Syndrome. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: Describe outcomes after treatment of Moebius syndrome (MBS) esotropia by adjustable bilateral medial rectus recession (BMR) with and without augmented superior rectus transposition (SRT) DESIGN: Retrospective case series METHODS: Patients meeting 2014 diagnostic criteria for MBS and treated at Boston Children's Hospital between 2003 and 2019 were identified via billing records and chart review. Visual acuity, sensorimotor evaluations, strabismus procedures, and other clinical features were recorded. Surgical outcomes for patients treated with strabismus surgery (excluding those with prior surgery elsewhere) were evaluated. Primary outcome measure was post-operative alignment comparing treatment by adjustable BMR versus adjustable BMR+SRT. RESULTS: Twenty patients had MBS, 12/20 (60%) were male. Fifteen (75%) had primary position esotropia, and all had bilateral abduction deficit. Eight of 20 met inclusion criteria for primary strabismus surgery outcome. Five had undergone adjustable BMR ranging from 4.5-6.5 mm. Three had undergone adjustable BMR+SRT, all with 4 mm medial rectus muscle recessions. Mean pre-operative esotropia before treatment by BMR was 39.5 PD (+/- 15 PD) with mean post-operative esotropia 9 PD (+/- 7.9 PD) at six months. Mean pre-operative esotropia before treatment by BMR+SRT was 70.8 PD (+/- 5.9 PD) with mean post-operative esotropia 2.5 PD (+/- 3.5 PD) at six months. Significantly greater reduction in esotropia resulted from BMR+SRT than BMR (P=0.036). CONCLUSIONS: BMR proved sufficient to treat esotropia < 50 PD and BMR+SRT for greater esotropia in patients with MBS-associated abduction limitation.
Prakalapakorn GS, Weinert MC, Stinnett SS. Photographic assessment of eyelid position using a simple measurement tool paired with cell phone photography in a pediatric population. J AAPOS 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: This proof-of-concept study evaluates the ability to assess eyelid measurements and the reproducibility of eyelid measurements using a simple measurement tool paired with digital cell phone photography in children. METHODS: Seventy consecutive patients and their siblings, 2-19 years of age, were prospectively enrolled. Participants underwent clinical examination and cell phone photography with a simple measurement tool. An ophthalmologist and nonophthalmologist assessed photographs for interpalpebral fissure distance (IPFD), margin reflex distance-1 (MRD1), and levator function (LF). Clinical examinations and photographs were repeated on the same day in a random sample (n = 20). The agreement of grading photographs compared to clinical examination was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. Intra-grader repeatability of the clinical examination, repeatability of photographic technique, and interobserver reproducibility of photographic assessment was evaluated with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). RESULTS: Of photographs acquired, both graders considered quality good/fair in 100% to assess IPFD and MRD1, and 70% to assess LF. The mean difference (limits of agreement) in mm between clinical examination and photographic assessment was 1.1 (-1.5 to 3.8) for IPFD, 0.7 (-1.8 to 3.1) for MRD1, and 1.1 (-3.5 to 5.7) for LF. Intraobserver repeatability on clinical examination was excellent for IPFD (ICC = 0.81), MRD1 (ICC = 0.88), and LF (ICC = 0.94). Repeatability of photographic technique was fair for IPFD (ICC = 0.44) and good for MRD1 (ICC = 0.74) and LF (ICC = 0.77). Interobserver photographic assessment repeatability was excellent for IPFD (ICC = 0.94), MRD1 (ICC = 0.96), and LF (ICC = 0.92). CONCLUSIONS: Photographic assessment of eyelid measurements in children is possible, highly reproducible between graders, and enables documentation for future comparison.
Hellström A, Pivodic A, Gränse L, Lundgren P, Sjöbom U, Nilsson AK, Söderling H, Hård A-L, Smith LEH, Löfqvist CA. Association of Docosahexaenoic Acid and Arachidonic Acid Serum Levels With Retinopathy of Prematurity in Preterm Infants. JAMA Netw Open 2021;4(10):e2128771.Abstract
Importance: Supplementing preterm infants with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) has been inconsistent in reducing the severity and incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Furthermore, few studies have measured the long-term serum lipid levels after supplementation. Objective: To assess whether ROP severity is associated with serum levels of LC-PUFA, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA), during the first 28 postnatal days. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study analyzed the Mega Donna Mega study, a randomized clinical trial that provided enteral fatty acid supplementation at 3 neonatal intensive care units in Sweden. Infants included in this cohort study were born at a gestational age of less than 28 weeks between December 20, 2016, and August 6, 2019. Main Outcomes and Measures: Severity of ROP was classified as no ROP, mild or moderate ROP (stage 1-2), or severe ROP (stage 3 and type 1). Serum phospholipid fatty acids were measured through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Ordinal logistic regression, with a description of unadjusted odds ratio (OR) as well as gestational age- and birth weight-adjusted ORs and 95% CIs, was used. Areas under the curve were used to calculate mean daily levels of fatty acids during postnatal days 1 to 28. Blood samples were obtained at the postnatal ages of 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. Results: A total of 175 infants were included in analysis. Of these infants, 99 were boys (56.6%); the median (IQR) gestational age was 25 weeks 5 days (24 weeks 3 days to 26 weeks 6 days), and the median (IQR) birth weight was 785 (650-945) grams. A higher DHA proportion was seen in infants with no ROP compared with those with mild or moderate ROP or severe ROP (OR per 0.5-molar percentage increase, 0.49 [95% CI, 0.36-0.68]; gestational age- and birth weight-adjusted OR, 0.66 [95% CI, 0.46-0.93]). The corresponding adjusted OR for AA levels per 1-molar percentage increase was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.66-1.05). The association between DHA levels and ROP severity appeared only in infants with sufficient AA levels, suggesting that a mean daily minimum level of 7.8 to 8.3 molar percentage of AA was necessary for a detectable association between DHA level and less severe ROP. Conclusions and Relevance: This cohort study found that higher mean daily serum levels of DHA during the first 28 postnatal days were associated with less severe ROP even after adjustment for known risk factors, but only in infants with sufficiently high AA levels. Further studies are needed to identify LC-PUFA supplementation strategies that may prevent ROP and other morbidities.
Teran E, Ramírez-Jaime R, Martínez-Gaytán C, Romo-García E, Costela FM. Refractive Error of Students (15- to 18-year-olds) in Northwest Mexico. Optom Vis Sci 2021;98(10):1127-1131.Abstract
SIGNIFICANCE: We assessed the prevalence of refractive error in a sample of children of Northern Mexico using the Refractive Error Study in Children protocol of the World Health Organization, which allows for the comparison with other global studies. PURPOSE: Uncorrected refractive error is the main cause of visual impairment in children. The purpose of this study was to assess the refractive error and visual dysfunctions of students (15 to 18 years old) in the upper-middle school system of Sinaloa, Mexico. METHODS: A total of 3468 students in Sinaloa's high school system participated in the study from 2017 to 2019. Optometrists and student clinicians from the Optometry Program of the Autonomous University of Sinaloa conducted the testing. Tests included visual acuities and static retinoscopy. We did not use a cycloplegic agent. RESULTS: The results showed a high prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors. Myopia, defined as a refractive error ≤-0.50 D, had a prevalence of 36.11% (95% confidence interval, 33.47 to 38.83%); hyperopia, defined as a refractive error ≥+2.00 D, had a prevalence of 1.49% (95% confidence interval, 0.09 to 2.33%); and astigmatism, defined as a refractive error with a cylinder ≥0.75 D, had a prevalence of 29.17% (95% confidence interval, 26.60 to 31.76%). We found a significant effect of sex on visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with a high prevalence of myopia reported in adolescents worldwide and in Mexico's northern regions. The results suggest that students attending high school and entering universities should be required to have an optometric eye examination. Additional studies are needed to investigate the prevalence of refractive errors in children in Mexico.
Chinn RN, Raghuram A, Curtiss M, Gehring A, De Paula AJ, Roberts TL. Repeatability of the Accommodative Response Measured by the Grand Seiko Autorefractor in Children with and without Amblyopia and Adults. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess test-retest repeatability of the accommodative response (AR) in children with and without amblyopia and adults using the Grand Seiko autorefractor. DESIGN: Prospective Reliability Assessment METHODS: Test-retest of accommodation was obtained while participants viewed 20/150 sized letters at 33 cm using the Grand Seiko autorefractor of children 5 to < 11 years with amblyopia (n=24) and without amblyopia (n=36), and adults 18 to < 35 years (n=34). Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement (LOA) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to assess repeatability and reliability. The AR between the fellow and amblyopic eyes of children with amblyopia and Eye 1 and Eye 2 of the visually normal participants was assessed using group comparisons. RESULTS: The 95% LOA of the AR was greatest in the amblyopic eyes (-1.25 D, 1.62 D) of children with amblyopia. The 95% LOA were similar between the fellow eyes (-0.88 D, 0.74 D) of children with amblyopia and both eyes of the children without amblyopia (Eye 1: -0.68 D, 0.71 D; Eye 2: -0.59 D, 0.70 D) and the adults (Eye 1: 95% LOA = -0.49 D to 0.45 D; Eye 2: LOA = -0.66 D to 0.67 D). ICC revealed the Grand Seiko autorefractor as a reliable instrument for measuring AR. CONCLUSIONS: The Grand Seiko autorefractor was more repeatable and reliable when measuring the AR in children and adults without amblyopia than in the amblyopic eye in children with amblyopia. It is recommended that multiple measures of the AR is obtained in amblyopic eyes to improve the precision of measures.
Neitzel AJ, Wolf B, Guo X, Shakarchi AF, Madden NA, Repka MX, Friedman DS, Collins ME. Effect of a Randomized Interventional School-Based Vision Program on Academic Performance of Students in Grades 3 to 7: A Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Ophthalmol 2021;139(10):1104-1114.Abstract
Importance: Uncorrected refractive error in school-aged children may affect learning. Objective: To assess the effect of a school-based vision program on academic achievement among students in grades 3 to 7. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cluster randomized clinical trial was conducted in Baltimore City Public Schools during school years from 2016 to 2019 among 2304 students in grades 3 to 7 who received eye examinations and eyeglasses. Intervention: Participating schools were randomized 1:1:1 to receive eye examinations and eyeglasses during 1 of 3 school years (2016-2017, 2017-2018, and 2018-2019). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was 1-year intervention impact, measured by effect size (ES), defined as the difference in score on an academic test (i-Ready or Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers tests on reading and mathematics) between intervention and control groups measured in SD units, comparing cohort 1 (intervention) with cohorts 2 and 3 (control) at the end of program year 1 and comparing cohort 2 (intervention) with cohort 3 (control) at the end of program year 2. The secondary outcome was 2-year intervention impact, comparing ES in cohort 1 (intervention) with cohort 3 (control) at the end of program year 2. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to assess the impact of the intervention. Analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Results: Among the 2304 students included in the study, 1260 (54.7%) were girls, with a mean (SD) age of 9.4 (1.4) years. The analysis included 964 students (41 schools) in cohort 1, 775 students (41 schools) in cohort 2, and 565 students (38 schools) in cohort 3. There were 1789 Black students (77.6%), 388 Latinx students (16.8%), and 406 students in special education (17.6%). There was an overall 1-year positive impact (ES, 0.09; P = .02) as assessed by the i-Ready reading test during school year 2016-2017. Positive impact was also observed among female students (ES, 0.15; P < .001), those in special education (ES, 0.25; P < .001), and students who performed in the lowest quartile at baseline (ES, 0.28; P < .001) on i-Ready reading and among students in elementary grades on i-Ready mathematics (ES, 0.03; P < .001) during school year 2016-2017. The intervention did not show a sustained impact at 2 years or on Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers testing. Conclusions and Relevance: Students in grades 3 to 7 who received eyeglasses through a school-based vision program achieved better reading scores. Students had improved academic achievement over 1 year; however, a sustained impact was not observed after 2 years. Trial Registration: The Registry of Efficacy and Effectiveness Studies Identifier: 1573.1v1.
Saldaris J, Weisenberg J, Pestana-Knight E, Marsh ED, Suter B, Rajaraman R, Heidary G, Olson HE, Devinsky O, Price D, Jacoby P, Leonard H, Benke TA, Demarest S, Downs J. Content Validation of Clinician-Reported Items for a Severity Measure for CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder. J Child Neurol 2021;36(11):998-1006.Abstract
CDKL5 deficiency disorder (CDD) results in early-onset seizures and severe developmental impairments. A CDD clinical severity assessment (CCSA) was previously developed with clinician and parent-report items to capture information on a range of domains. Consistent with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines, content validation is the first step in evaluating the psychometric properties of an outcome measure. The aim of this study was to validate the content of the clinician-reported items in the CCSA (CCSA-Clinician). Eight neurologists leading the USA CDD Center of Excellence clinics were interviewed using the "think aloud" technique to critique 26 clinician-reported items. Common themes were aggregated, and a literature search of related assessments informed item modifications. The clinicians then participated in 2 consensus meetings to review themes and finalize the items. A consensus was achieved for the content of the CCSA-Clinician. Eight of the original items were omitted, 11 items were added, and the remaining 18 items were revised. The final 29 items were classified into 2 domains: functioning and neurologic impairments. This study enabled refinement of the CCSA-Clinician and provided evidence for its content validity. This preliminary validation is essential before field testing and further validation, in order to advance the instrument toward clinical trial readiness.
Chinn RN, Michalak SM, Shoshany TN, Bishop K, Staffa SJ, Hunter DG. Effect of Sequential and Simultaneous Patching Regimens in Unilateral Amblyopia. Am J Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: Many clinicians treat unilateral amblyopia with glasses alone and initiate patching when needed; others start glasses and patching simultaneously. In this study, we reviewed the outcomes of the two approaches at our institution. DESIGN: Retrospective non-randomized clinical trial METHODS: Setting: Institutional practice. PATIENT POPULATION: All patients diagnosed with amblyopia at Boston Children's Hospital between 2010 and 2014. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Unilateral amblyopia visual acuity (VA): 20/40-20/200 with interocular difference ≥ 3 lines, age 3-12 years, with a 6-month visit. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Deprivation amblyopia, prior amblyopia treatment, treatment other than patching, surgery. Patients were categorized as "simultaneous treatment" (concurrent glasses and patching therapy at their first visit) or "sequential treatment" (glasses alone at first visit followed by patching therapy at second visit.) Observation Procedures: Patient demographics, VA, and stereopsis were compared. OUTCOME MEASURES: VA and stereopsis at the last visit on treatment. RESULTS: We identified 98 patients who met inclusion criteria: 36 received simultaneous treatment and 62 sequential treatment. Median amblyopic eye VA improved similarly between the simultaneous (∆0.40 (0.56, 0.30 logMAR) and sequential (∆0.40 (0.52, 0.27 logMAR) groups. Patients without stereopsis at first visit had better stereopsis outcomes with sequential treatment (5.12 (4.00, 7.51) log stereopsis) compared to simultaneous treatment (8.01 (5.65, 9.21) log stereopsis, p ≤ 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: VA improved approximately 4 lines regardless of treatment type. For children without stereopsis at first presentation, sequential patching yielded better stereopsis outcomes. These findings require further validation and highlight the importance of evaluating stereopsis in future studies.
Elhusseiny AM, Bishop K, Staffa SJ, Zurakowski D, Hunter DG, Mantagos IS. Virtual reality prototype for binocular therapy in older children and adults with amblyopia. J AAPOS 2021;Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the best-corrected visual acuity and stereoacuity gains in children >7 years of age and adults with unilateral amblyopia treated with a prototype virtual reality-based binocular amblyopia therapy. METHODS: In this randomized, double masked, cross-in clinical trial, patients at Boston Children's Hospital with unilateral anisometropic and/or strabismic amblyopia and history of prior amblyopia treatment failure were randomized to either a full-treatment group (8 weeks of binocular treatment using therapeutic software application in virtual reality headset) or a sham-crossover group (4 weeks of sham treatment followed by 4 weeks of binocular treatment). Amblyopic eye visual acuity and stereoacuity were evaluated at 4, 8, and 16 weeks' follow-up. RESULTS: The study cohort included 20 participants (10 females), with a median age of 9 years (range, 7-38 years). In the full-treatment group (11 patients), the mean amblyopic eye logMAR visual acuity at 16 weeks was 0.49 ± 0.26, compared with 0.47 ± 0.20 at baseline. In the sham-crossover group, it was 0.51 ± 0.18 at 16 weeks, compared with 0.53 ± 0.21 at baseline. Stereoacuity (log arcsec) was significantly improved, from 7.3 ± 2 at baseline to 6.6 ± 2.3 at 8 weeks (P < 0.001) and 6.7 ± 2.6 at 16 weeks (P < 0.001). No significant adverse events (diplopia, asthenopia, or worsening strabismus) were noted in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Although the virtual reality-based prototype for binocular amblyopia therapy did not significantly improve visual acuity in the amblyopic eyes of older children and adults, stereoacuity did significantly improve compared with baseline; improvements were clinically minute. However, larger studies are required to confirm the results.
Elhusseiny AM, VanderVeen DK. Optical coherence tomography in the setting of optic nerve head cupping reversal in secondary childhood glaucoma. J AAPOS 2021;Abstract
Reversal of optic nerve head (ONH) cupping has been considered an important clinical observation that signals surgical success and control of intraocular pressure (IOP) in childhood glaucoma. Many theories based on elasticity of pediatric eyes have been proposed, including anterior movement of the elastic lamina cribrosa or shrinkage of the scleral canal. The relationship between these factors and axonal loss is unclear when reversal of cupping has been observed. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) optical coherence tomography (OCT) can help to clarify this. We present a case series of 4 pediatric patients with secondary glaucoma that demonstrated ONH cupping reversal with pre- and postoperative clinical images and RNFL OCT.
Maleki A, Anesi SD, Look-Why S, Manhapra A, Foster SC. Pediatric uveitis: A comprehensive review. Surv Ophthalmol 2021;Abstract
Pediatric uveitis accounts for 5-10% of all uveitis. Uveitis in children differs from adult uveitis in that it is commonly asymptomatic and can become chronic and cause chronic damage to ocular structures. The diagnosis might be delayed for multiple reasons, including the preverbal age and difficulties in examining young children. Pediatric uveitis may be infectious or non-infectious in etiology. The etiology of non-infectious uveitis is presumed to be autoimmune or autoinflammatory. The most common causes of uveitis in this age group are idiopathic and juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis. The stepladder approach for the treatment of pediatric uveitis is based on expert opinion and algorithms proposed by multidisciplinary panels. Uveitis morbidities in pediatric patients include cataract, glaucoma, and amblyopia. Pediatric patients with uveitis should be frequently examined until remission is achieved. Once in remission, the interval between follow-up visits can be extended; however, it is recommended that even after remission the child should be seen every 8-12 weeks depending on the history of uveitis and the medications used. Close follow up is also necessary as uveitis can flare up during immunomodulatory therapy. It is crucial to measure the impact of uveitis, it's treatment, and it's complications on the child and the child's family. Visual acuity can be considered as an acceptable criterion for assessing visual function. Additionally, the number of cells in the anterior chamber can be a measure of disease activity. We review different aspects of pediatric uveitis. We discuss the mechanisms of noninfectious uveitis, including autoimmune and autoinflammatory etiologies, and the risks of developing uveitis in children with systemic rheumatologic diseases. We address the risk factors for developing morbidities, the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) criteria for timing and anatomical classifications and describe a stepladder approach in the treatment of pediatric uveitis based on expert opinion and algorithms proposed by multi-disciplinary panels. We describe the most common entities for each type of anatomical classification and complications of uveitis for the pediatric population. Additionally, we address monitoring of children with uveitis and evaluation of Quality of Life.

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