Age-related Macular Degeneration

Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Publications

Douglas VP, Douglas KA, Vavvas DG, Miller JW, Miller JB. Short- and Long-Term Visual Outcomes in Patients Receiving Intravitreal Injections: The Impact of the Coronavirus 2019 Disease (COVID-19)-Related Lockdown. J Clin Med 2022;11(8)Abstract
Purpose: To investigate the short- and long-term impact of COVID-19-related lockdown on the vision of patients requiring intravitreal injections (IVI) for neovascular Age-related Macular degeneration (nvAMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), or branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). Methods: This is a retrospective study from the Retina department of three Mass Eye and Ear centers. Charts of patients age of ≥ 18 years with any of the abovementioned diagnoses who had a scheduled appointment anytime between 17 March 2020 until 18 May 2020 (lockdown period in Boston, Massachusetts) were reviewed at baseline (up to 12 weeks before the lockdown), at first available follow-up (=actual f/u) during or after the lockdown period, at 3 months, 6 months, and at last available completed appointment of 2020. Results: A total of 1001 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of those patients, 479 (47.9%) completed their intended f/u appointment, while 522 missed it (canceled and "no show"). The delay in care of those who missed it was 59.15 days [standard deviation (SD) ± 49.6]. In these patients, significant loss of vision was noted at actual f/u [Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in LogMAR (Logarithm of the Minimum Angle of Resolution)-mean (±SD)-completed: 0.45 (±0.46), missed: 0.53 (±0.55); p = 0.01], which was more prominent in the DR group [Visual acuity (VA) change in LogMAR-mean (±SD); completed: 0.04 (±0.28), missed: 0.18 (±0.44); p = 0.02] and CRVO [completed: -0.06 (±0.27), missed: 0.11 (±0.35); p = <0.001] groups followed by nvAMD [completed: 0.006 (±0.16), missed: 0.06 (±0.27); p = 0.004] and BRVO [completed: -0.02 (±0.1), missed: 0.03 (±0.14); p = 0.02] ones. Overall, a higher percent of people who missed their intended f/u experienced vision loss of more than 15 letters at last f/u compared to those who completed it [missed vs. completed; 13.4% vs. 7.4% in nvAMD (p = 0.72), 7.8% vs. 6.3% in DR (0.84), 15.5% vs. 9.9% in CRVO (p < 0.001) and 9.6% vs. 2% in BRVO (p = 0.48)]. Conclusions: Delay in care of about 8.45 weeks can lead to loss of vision in patients who receive IVI with DR and CRVO patients being more vulnerable in the short-term, whereas in the long-term, CRVO patients followed by the nvAMD patients demonstrating the least vision recovery. BRVO patients were less likely to be affected by the delay in care. Adherence to treatment is key for maintaining and improving visual outcomes in patients who require IVI.
Douglas VP, Garg I, Douglas KA, Miller JB. Subthreshold Exudative Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV): Presentation of This Uncommon Subtype and Other CNVs in Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). J Clin Med 2022;11(8)Abstract
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible vision loss in people over the age of 50 worldwide. Exudative or neovascular AMD is a more severe subset of AMD which is characterized by the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Recent advancements in multimodal ophthalmic imaging, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT-angiography (OCT-A), have facilitated the detection and characterization of previously undetectable neovascular lesions and have enabled a more refined classification of CNV in exudative as well as nonexudative AMD patients. Subthreshold exudative CNV is a novel subtype of exudative AMD that typically presents asymptomatically with good visual acuity and is characterized by stable persistent or intermittent subretinal fluid (SRF). This review aims to provide an overview of the clinical as well as multimodal imaging characteristics of CNV in AMD, including this new clinical phenotype, and propose effective approaches for management.
Zhang C, Owen LA, Lillvis JH, Zhang SX, Kim IK, Deangelis MM. AMD Genomics: Non-Coding RNAs as Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets. J Clin Med 2022;11(6)Abstract
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is the world's leading cause of blindness in the aging population. Although the clinical stages and forms of AMD have been elucidated, more specific prognostic tools are required to determine when patients with early and intermediate AMD will progress into the advanced stages of AMD. Another challenge in the field has been the appropriate development of therapies for intermediate AMD and advanced atrophic AMD. After numerous negative clinical trials, an anti-C5 agent and anti-C3 agent have recently shown promising results in phase 3 clinical trials, in terms of slowing the growth of geographic atrophy, an advanced form of AMD. Interestingly, both drugs appear to be associated with an increased incidence of wet AMD, another advanced form of the disease, and will require frequent intravitreal injections. Certainly, there remains a need for other therapeutic agents with the potential to prevent progression to advanced stages of the disease. Investigation of the role and clinical utility of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is a major advancement in biology that has only been minimally applied to AMD. In the following review, we discuss the clinical relevance of ncRNAs in AMD as both biomarkers and therapeutic targets.
Nigalye AK, Hess K, Pundlik SJ, Jeffrey BG, Cukras CA, Husain D. Dark Adaptation and Its Role in Age-Related Macular Degeneration. J Clin Med 2022;11(5)Abstract
Dark adaptation (DA) refers to the slow recovery of visual sensitivity in darkness following exposure to intense or prolonged illumination, which bleaches a significant amount of the rhodopsin. This natural process also offers an opportunity to understand cellular function in the outer retina and evaluate for presence of disease. How our eyes adapt to darkness can be a key indicator of retinal health, which can be altered in the presence of certain diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A specific focus on clinical aspects of DA measurement and its significance to furthering our understanding of AMD has revealed essential findings underlying the pathobiology of the disease. The process of dark adaptation involves phototransduction taking place mainly between the photoreceptor outer segments and the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) layer. DA occurs over a large range of luminance and is modulated by both cone and rod photoreceptors. In the photopic ranges, rods are saturated and cone cells adapt to the high luminance levels. However, under scotopic ranges, cones are unable to respond to the dim luminance and rods modulate the responses to lower levels of light as they can respond to even a single photon. Since the cone visual cycle is also based on the Muller cells, measuring the impairment in rod-based dark adaptation is thought to be particularly relevant to diseases such as AMD, which involves both photoreceptors and RPE. Dark adaptation parameters are metrics derived from curve-fitting dark adaptation sensitivities over time and can represent specific cellular function. Parameters such as the cone-rod break (CRB) and rod intercept time (RIT) are particularly sensitive to changes in the outer retina. There is some structural and functional continuum between normal aging and the AMD pathology. Many studies have shown an increase of the rod intercept time (RIT), i.e., delays in rod-mediated DA in AMD patients with increasing disease severity determined by increased drusen grade, pigment changes and the presence of subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) and association with certain morphological features in the peripheral retina. Specifications of spatial testing location, repeatability of the testing, ease and availability of the testing device in clinical settings, and test duration in elderly population are also important. We provide a detailed overview in light of all these factors.
Zeng R, Garg I, Miller JB. Complete Resolution of Central Soft Drusen without Geographic Atrophy or Choroidal Neovascularization. J Clin Med 2022;11(6)Abstract
The treatment and prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) traditionally involve lifestyle modifications and antioxidant supplementation, including the AREDS2 formula. We present a case of a woman with dry AMD in her right eye with several large, confluent central drusen on her exam and optical coherence tomography B-scan. Over the course of a year, the drusen almost completely disappeared, but the retinal layers were preserved without the development of geographic atrophy or choroidal neovascularization. While the exact cause of this phenomenon is unclear, it was thought to be associated with this patient's strict daily use of numerous dietary supplements. This case highlights the potential in exploring alternative medicine supplements in the treatment of AMD.
Deffler RA, Xu J, Bittner AK, Bowers AR, Hassan SE, Ross N, Cooley S-SL, Doubt A, Davidorf FH, Dougherty BE, Dougherty BE. Use and Perceptions of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems by Older Drivers With and Without Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Transl Vis Sci Technol 2022;11(3):22.Abstract
Purpose: Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) have been reported to improve the safety of elderly and normally sighted drivers. The purpose of this study was to assess exposure to, perceived safety of, comfort level with, and interest in using ADAS among drivers with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Current drivers aged 60+ years were recruited at four US sites to complete a survey about ADAS and driving habits. Frequency of use and/or perceptions of eight ADAS were investigated. An avoidance score was generated using questions about difficult driving situations. Results: The survey was completed by 166 participants (80 with AMD vs. 86 without). Participants with AMD had worse self-rated vision than those without (34% vs. 2% poor or fair rating), and drove fewer weekly miles (median [interquartile range [IQR] 30 [15 to 75] vs. 60 [30 to 121] miles, P = 0.002). Participants with AMD reported more avoidance of difficult driving situations (P < 0.001). There was no difference in the number of ADAS used by AMD status (median [IQR for AMD = 2.5 [1 to 5] vs. 3 [2 to 4] without, P = 0.87). Greater reported number of ADAS used was associated with less avoidance of difficult situations (P = 0.02). The majority perceived improved safety with most ADAS. Conclusions: Many drivers with AMD utilize common ADAS, which subjectively improve their road safety and may help to reduce self-imposed restrictions for difficult situations and mileage. Translational Relevance: Drivers with AMD are adopting readily available ADAS, for which they reported potential benefits, such as safety and less restrictive driving.
Armstrong GW, Miller JB. Telemedicine for the Diagnosis and Management of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review. J Clin Med 2022;11(3)Abstract
Use of ophthalmic telemedicine for patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has shown remarkable advances over recent years. The recent COVID pandemic accelerated this transition since in-person evaluation of elderly patients at high risk for advanced AMD and severe vision loss were also at higher risk for complications from COVID infection. To date, ophthalmic telemedicine has been successfully used in remote retinal consultation by general ophthalmologists for AMD management, hybrid testing visits with both in-office testing and remote evaluation, as well as early successes in home-based remote monitoring of patients with high-risk AMD. We therefore review the current literature and evidence base related to ophthalmic telemedicine for AMD.
Lains I, Mendez KM, Gil JQ, Miller JB, Kelly RS, Barreto P, Kim IK, Vavvas DG, Murta JN, Liang L, Silva R, Miller JW, Lasky-Su J, Husain D. Urinary Mass Spectrometry Profiles in Age-Related Macular Degeneration. J Clin Med 2022;11(4)Abstract
We and others have shown that patients with different severity stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have distinct plasma metabolomic profiles compared to controls. Urine is a biofluid that can be obtained non-invasively and, in other fields, urine metabolomics has been proposed as a feasible alternative to plasma biomarkers. However, no studies have applied urinary mass spectrometry (MS) metabolomics to AMD. This study aimed to assess urinary metabolomic profiles of patients with different stages of AMD and a control group. We included two prospectively designed, multicenter, cross-sectional study cohorts: Boston, US (n = 185) and Coimbra, Portugal (n = 299). We collected fasting urine samples, which were used for metabolomic profiling (Ultrahigh Performance Liquid chromatography-Mass Spectrometry). Multivariable logistic and ordinal logistic regression models were used for analysis, accounting for gender, age, body mass index and use of AREDS supplementation. Results from both cohorts were then meta-analyzed. No significant differences in urine metabolites were seen when comparing patients with AMD and controls. When disease severity was considered as an outcome, six urinary metabolites differed significantly (p < 0.01). In particular, two of the metabolites identified have been previously shown by our group to also differ in the plasma of patients of AMD compared to controls and across severity stages. While there are fewer urinary metabolites associated with AMD than plasma metabolites, this study identified some differences across stages of disease that support previous work performed with plasma, thus highlighting the potential of these metabolites as future biomarkers for AMD.
Zekavat SM, Sekimitsu S, Ye Y, Raghu V, Zhao H, Elze T, Segrè AV, Wiggs JL, Natarajan P, Del Priore L, Zebardast N, Wang JC. Photoreceptor layer thinning is an early biomarker for age-related macular degeneration: Epidemiological and genetic evidence from UK Biobank optical coherence tomography data. Ophthalmology 2022;Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Despite widespread use of optical coherence tomography (OCT), an early-stage imaging biomarker for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has not been identified. Pathophysiologically, the timing of drusen accumulation in relation to photoreceptor degeneration in AMD remains unclear, as are the inherited genetic variants contributing to these processes. Here, we jointly analyzed OCT, electronic health record, and genomic data to characterize the time sequence of changes in retinal layer thicknesses in AMD, as well as epidemiological and genetic associations between retinal layer thicknesses and AMD. DESIGN: Cohort study PARTICIPANTS: 44,823 UK Biobank individuals (enrollment ages 40-70y, 54% female, median 10y follow-up). METHODS: The Topcon Advanced Boundary Segmentation algorithm was used for retinal layer segmentation. We associated 9 retinal layer thicknesses with prevalent AMD (present at enrollment) in a logistic regression model, and with incident AMD (diagnosed after enrollment) in a Cox proportional hazards model. Next, we associated AMD-associated genetic alleles, individually and as a polygenic risk score (PRS), with retinal layer thicknesses. All analyses were adjusted for age, age2, sex, smoking status, and principal components of ancestry. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalent and incident AMD RESULTS: Photoreceptor segment (PS) thinning was observed throughout the lifespan of individuals analyzed, while retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane complex (RPE+BM) thickening started after age 57y. Each standard deviation (SD) of PS thinning and RPE+BM thickening were associated with incident AMD (PS: HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.23-1.47, P=3.7x10-11; RPE+BM: HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.22, P=0.00024). The AMD PRS was associated with PS thinning (Beta -0.21 SD per 2-fold genetically increased risk of AMD, 95% CI -0.23 to -0.19, P=2.8x10-74), and its association with RPE+BM was U-shaped (thinning with AMD PRS<92nd percentile and thickening with AMD PRS>92nd percentile). The loci with strongest support for genetic correlation were AMD risk-raising variants CFH:rs570618-T, CFH:10922109-C, and ARMS2/HTRA1:rs3750846-C on PS thinning, and SYN3/TIMP3:rs5754227-T on RPE+BM thickening. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiologically, PS thinning precedes RPE+BM thickening by decades, and is the retinal layer most strongly predictive of future AMD risk. Genetically, AMD risk variants are associated with decreased PS thickness. Overall, these findings support PS thinning as an early-stage biomarker for future AMD development.
Huang S, Liu C-H, Wang Z, Fu Z, Britton WR, Blomfield AK, Kamenecka TM, Dunaief JL, Solt LA, Chen J. REV-ERBα regulates age-related and oxidative stress-induced degeneration in retinal pigment epithelium via NRF2. Redox Biol 2022;51:102261.Abstract
Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) dysfunction and atrophy occur in dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), often leading to photoreceptor degeneration and vision loss. Accumulated oxidative stress during aging contributes to RPE dysfunction and degeneration. Here we show that the nuclear receptor REV-ERBα, a redox sensitive transcription factor, protects RPE from age-related degeneration and oxidative stress-induced damage. Genetic deficiency of REV-ERBα leads to accumulated oxidative stress, dysfunction and degeneration of RPE, and AMD-like ocular pathologies in aging mice. Loss of REV-ERBα exacerbates chemical-induced RPE damage, and pharmacological activation of REV-ERBα protects RPE from oxidative damage both in vivo and in vitro. REV-ERBα directly regulates transcription of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and its downstream antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase to counter oxidative damage. Moreover, aged mice with RPE specific knockout of REV-ERBα also exhibit accumulated oxidative stress and fundus and RPE pathologies. Together, our results suggest that REV-ERBα is a novel intrinsic protector of the RPE against age-dependent oxidative stress and a new molecular target for developing potential therapies to treat age-related retinal degeneration.
Heckel E, Cagnone G, Agnihotri T, Cakir B, Das A, Kim JS, Kim N, Lavoie G, Situ A, Pundir S, Sun Y, Wünnemann F, Pierce KA, Dennis C, Mitchell GA, Chemtob S, Rezende FA, Andelfinger G, Clish CB, Roux PP, Sapieha P, Smith LEH, Joyal J-S. Triglyceride-derived fatty acids reduce autophagy in a model of retinal angiomatous proliferation. JCI Insight 2022;7(6)Abstract
Dyslipidemia and autophagy have been implicated in the pathogenesis of blinding neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NV-AMD). VLDL receptor (VLDLR), expressed in photoreceptors with a high metabolic rate, facilitates the uptake of triglyceride-derived fatty acids. Since fatty acid uptake is reduced in Vldlr-/- tissues, more remain in circulation, and the retina is fuel deficient, driving the formation in mice of neovascular lesions reminiscent of retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP), a subtype of NV-AMD. Nutrient scarcity and energy failure are classically mitigated by increasing autophagy. We found that excess circulating lipids restrained retinal autophagy, which contributed to pathological angiogenesis in the Vldlr-/- RAP model. Triglyceride-derived fatty acid sensed by free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1) restricted autophagy and oxidative metabolism in photoreceptors. FFAR1 suppressed transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of autophagy and lipid metabolism. Reduced TFEB, in turn, decreased sirtuin-3 expression and mitochondrial respiration. Metabolomic signatures of mouse RAP-like retinas were consistent with a role in promoting angiogenesis. This signature was also found in human NV-AMD vitreous. Restoring photoreceptor autophagy in Vldlr-/- retinas, either pharmacologically or by deleting Ffar1, enhanced metabolic efficiency and suppressed pathological angiogenesis. Dysregulated autophagy by circulating lipids might therefore contribute to the energy failure of photoreceptors driving neovascular eye diseases, and FFAR1 may be a target for intervention.
Lin JB, Halawa OA, Husain D, Miller JW, Vavvas DG. Dyslipidemia in age-related macular degeneration. Eye (Lond) 2022;36(2):312-318.Abstract
Lipid-rich drusen are the sine qua non of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in older adults in the developed world. Efforts directed at uncovering effective therapeutic strategies have led to the hypothesis that altered lipid metabolism may play a pathogenic role in AMD. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that: (1) drusen, the hallmark histopathologic feature of AMD, are composed of lipids, (2) polymorphisms of genes involved in lipid homeostasis are associated with increased odds of AMD, (3) metabolomics studies show that patients with AMD have alterations in metabolites from lipid pathways, and (4) alterations in serum lipid profiles as a reflection of systemic dyslipidemia are associated with AMD. There is strong evidence that statins, which are well described for treating dyslipidemia and reducing risk associated with cardiovascular disease, may have a role for treating certain cohorts of AMD patients, but this has yet to be conclusively proven. Of interest, the specific changes in serum lipoprotein profiles associated with decreased cardiovascular risk (i.e., high HDL levels) have been shown in some studies to be associated with increased risk of AMD. In this review, we highlight the evidence that supports a role for altered lipid metabolism in AMD and provide our perspective regarding the remaining questions that need to be addressed before lipid-based therapies can emerge for specific cohorts of AMD patients.
Lains I, Mendez K, Nigalye A, Katz R, Douglas VP, Kelly RS, Kim IK, Miller JB, Vavvas DG, Liang L, Lasky-Su J, Miller JW, Husain D. Plasma Metabolomic Profiles Associated with Three-Year Progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Metabolites 2022;12(1)Abstract
Plasma metabolomic profiles have been shown to be associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and its severity stages. However, all studies performed to date have been cross-sectional and have not assessed progression of AMD. This prospective, longitudinal, pilot study analyzes, for the first time, the association between plasma metabolomic profiles and progression of AMD over a 3-year period. At baseline and 3 years later, subjects with AMD (n = 108 eyes) and controls (n = 45 eyes) were imaged with color fundus photos for AMD staging and tested for retinal function with dark adaptation (DA). Fasting plasma samples were also collected for metabolomic profiling. AMD progression was considered present if AMD stage at 3 years was more advanced than at baseline (n = 26 eyes, 17%). Results showed that, of the metabolites measured at baseline, eight were associated with 3-year AMD progression (p < 0.01) and 19 (p < 0.01) with changes in DA. Additionally, changes in the levels (i.e., between 3 years and baseline) of 6 and 17 metabolites demonstrated significant associations (p < 0.01) with AMD progression and DA, respectively. In conclusion, plasma metabolomic profiles are associated with clinical and functional progression of AMD at 3 years. These findings contribute to our understanding of mechanisms of AMD progression and the identification of potential therapeutics for this blinding disease.

Pages