Pediatric Ophthalmology

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VanderVeen DK, Martin CR, Mehendale R, Allred EN, Dammann O, Leviton A, Leviton A. Early nutrition and weight gain in preterm newborns and the risk of retinopathy of prematurity. PLoS One 2013;8(5):e64325.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify nutritional and weight gain limitations associated with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) severity among very preterm newborns. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 1180 infants <28 weeks GA at birth with ROP examination results were grouped and analyzed by quartile of weekly total calorie, carbohydrate, protein, and lipid intake, as well as growth velocity between postnatal days 7 and 28 (adjusted for GA and birth weight Z-score). ROP was categorized by development of no, mild (
VanderVeen DK, Drews-Botsch CD, Nizam A, Bothun ED, Wilson LB, Wilson EM, Lambert SR, Lambert SR. Outcomes of Secondary Intraocular Lens Implantation in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study. J Cataract Refract Surg 2020;Abstract
PURPOSE: To report outcomes of secondary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS) SETTING:: Multicenter clinical practice DESIGN:: Secondary analysis of patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial METHODS:: Details regarding all secondary IOL surgeries conducted in children enrolled in the IATS were compiled. We evaluated visual outcomes, refractive outcomes, and adverse events at age 10 ½ years. Comparisons were made to eyes that remained aphakic and to eyes randomized to primary IOL placement. RESULTS: 55/57 patients randomized to aphakia with contact lens correction were seen for the 10 ½ year study visit; 24/55 eyes (44%) had secondary IOL surgery. Median age at IOL surgery was 5.4 years (range 1.7 to 10.3 years). Mean absolute prediction error was 1.0 ± 0.7D. At age 10 ½ years, the median log MAR VA was 0.9 (range 0.2 to 1.7), similar to VA in the 31 eyes still aphakic (0.8, range 0.1 to 2.9); the number of eyes with stable or improved VA scores between the 4 ½ and 10 ½ year study visits was also similar (78% secondary IOL eyes, 84% aphakic eyes). For eyes undergoing IOL implantation after the 4.5 year study visit (n=22), the mean refraction at age 10 ½ years was -3.2 ±2.7D (range -9.9D to 1.1D), compared to -5.5 ±6.6 D (n=53, range -26.5 to 3.0D) in eyes with primary IOL (p=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Delayed IOL implantation allows a more predictable refractive outcome at age 10 ½ years, though the range of refractive error is still large.
Vongsachang H, Friedman DS, Inns A, Kretz AM, Mukherjee MR, Callan J, Wahl M, Repka MX, Collins ME. Parent and Teacher Perspectives on Factors Decreasing Participation in School-Based Vision Programs. Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2020;27(3):226-236.Abstract
: To examine factors decreasing participation in school-based vision programs from parent and teacher perspectives.: We conducted 41 semi-structured focus groups (20 parent groups, 21 teacher/staff groups), at 10 Baltimore and 11 Chicago public elementary and middle schools offering school-based vision programs. School-based vision programs provided vision screening, eye exams, and eyeglasses if needed. Focus groups ranged in size from 2-9 participants (median = 5). Sessions were recorded, transcribed, and coded through an iterative process to develop themes using inductive analysis.: Ninety parents and 117 teachers/staff participated. Participants identified five major factors decreasing participation in school-based vision programs: (1) challenges with the consent form, including distribution, collection, and literacy and language barriers; (2) having existing eye care; (3) misunderstandings about the program, especially related to cost and insurance; (4) difficulty raising parental awareness of the program; and (5) certain attitudes towards vision, eye care, and school-based programs, including low prioritization of eye care, mistrust of the program, fear of sharing private information, not believing their child needs glasses, and reluctance accepting 'subsidized' services.: Parents and teachers identified important structural barriers to participation (i.e., consent form challenges and low parental awareness) and specific reasons for non-participation (i.e., attitudes, misunderstanding of the program, existing eye care) in school-based vision programs. Effective strategies are needed to facilitate return of consent forms and promote awareness of school-based vision programs among parents. Programs should also target services towards those currently without access to eye care and increase awareness about paediatric vision needs.
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Wallace DK, Kraker RT, Freedman SF, Crouch ER, Hutchinson AK, Bhatt AR, Rogers DL, Yang MB, Haider KM, VanderVeen DK, Siatkowski MR, Dean TW, Beck RW, Repka MX, Smith LE, Good WV, Hartnett ME, Kong L, Holmes JM, Holmes JM. Assessment of Lower Doses of Intravitreous Bevacizumab for Retinopathy of Prematurity: A Phase 1 Dosing Study. JAMA Ophthalmol 2017;135(6):654-656.Abstract
Importance: Intravitreous bevacizumab (0.25 to 0.625 mg) is increasingly used to treat type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), but there remain concerns about systemic toxicity. A much lower dose may be effective while reducing systemic risk. Objective: To find a dose of intravitreous bevacizumab that was lower than previously used for severe ROP, was effective in this study, and could be tested in future larger studies. Design, Setting, and Participants: Between May 2015 and September 2016, 61 premature infants with type 1 ROP in 1 or both eyes were enrolled in a masked, multicenter, phase 1 dose de-escalation study. One eye of 10 to 14 infants received 0.25 mg of intravitreous bevacizumab. If successful, the dose was reduced for the next group of infants (to 0.125 mg, then 0.063 mg, and finally 0.031 mg). Diluted bevacizumab was delivered using 300 µL syringes with 5/16-inch, 30-gauge fixed needles. Interventions: Bevacizumab injections at 0.25 mg, 0.125 mg, 0.063 mg, and 0.031 mg. Main Outcomes and Measures: Success was defined as improvement in preinjection plus disease or zone I stage 3 ROP by 5 days after injection or sooner, and no recurrence of type 1 ROP or severe neovascularization requiring additional treatment within 4 weeks. Results: Fifty-eight of 61 enrolled infants had 4-week outcomes completed; mean birth weight was 709 g and mean gestational age was 24.9 weeks. Success was achieved in 11 of 11 eyes at 0.25 mg, 14 of 14 eyes at 0.125 mg, 21 of 24 eyes at 0.063 mg, and 9 of 9 eyes at 0.031 mg. Conclusions and Relevance: A dose of bevacizumab as low as 0.031 mg was effective in 9 of 9 eyes in this phase 1 study and warrants further investigation. Identifying a lower effective dose of bevacizumab may reduce the risk for neurodevelopmental disability or detrimental effects on other organs.
Wallace DK, Dean TW, Hartnett ME, Kong L, Smith LE, Hubbard BG, McGregor ML, Jordan CO, Mantagos IS, Bell EF, Kraker RT, Kraker RT. A Dosing Study of Bevacizumab for Retinopathy of Prematurity: Late Recurrences and Additional Treatments. Ophthalmology 2018;125(12):1961-1966.Abstract
PURPOSE: Intravitreal bevacizumab is increasingly used to treat severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), but it enters the bloodstream, and there is concern that it may alter development of other organs. Previously we reported short-term outcomes of 61 infants enrolled in a dose de-escalation study, and we report the late recurrences and additional treatments. DESIGN: Masked, multicenter, dose de-escalation study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 61 premature infants with type 1 ROP. METHODS: If type 1 ROP was bilateral at enrollment, then the study eye was randomly selected. In the study eye, bevacizumab intravitreal injections were given at de-escalating doses of 0.25 mg, 0.125 mg, 0.063 mg, or 0.031 mg; if needed, fellow eyes received 1 dose level higher: 0.625 mg, 0.25 mg, 0.125 mg, or 0.063 mg, respectively. After 4 weeks, additional treatment was at the discretion of the investigator. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Early and late ROP recurrences, additional treatments, and structural outcomes after 6 months. RESULTS: Of 61 study eyes, 25 (41%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 29%-54%) received additional treatment: 3 (5%; 95% CI, 1%-14%) for early failure (within 4 weeks), 11 (18%; 95% CI, 9%-30%) for late recurrence of ROP (after 4 weeks), and 11 (18%; 95% CI, 9%-30%) for persistent avascular retina. Re-treatment for early failure or late recurrence occurred in 2 of 11 eyes (18%; 95% CI, 2%-52%) treated with 0.25 mg, 4 of 16 eyes (25%; 95% CI, 7%-52%) treated with 0.125 mg, 8 of 24 eyes (33%; 95% CI, 16%-55%) treated with 0.063 mg, and 0 (0%; 95% CI, 0%-31%) of 10 eyes treated with 0.031 mg. By 6 months corrected age, 56 of 61 study eyes had regression of ROP with normal posterior poles, 1 study eye had developed a Stage 5 retinal detachment, and 4 infants had died of preexisting medical conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal structural outcomes are very good after low-dose bevacizumab treatment for ROP, although many eyes received additional treatment.
Wallace DK, Kraker RT, Freedman SF, Crouch ER, Bhatt AR, Hartnett EM, Yang MB, Rogers DL, Hutchinson AK, VanderVeen DK, Haider KM, Siatkowski MR, Dean TW, Beck RW, Repka MX, Smith LE, Good WV, Kong L, Cotter SA, Holmes JM, Holmes JM. Short-term Outcomes After Very Low-Dose Intravitreous Bevacizumab for Retinopathy of Prematurity. JAMA Ophthalmol 2020;Abstract
Importance: Intravitreous bevacizumab (0.25 mg to 0.625 mg) is commonly used to treat type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), but there are concerns about systemic toxicity, particularly the risk of neurodevelopmental delay. A much lower dose may be effective for ROP while reducing systemic risk. Previously, after testing doses of 0.25 mg to 0.031 mg, doses as low as 0.031 mg were found to be effective in small cohorts of infants. Objective: To find the lowest dose of intravitreous bevacizumab effective for severe ROP. Design, Setting, and Participants: Between April 2017 and May 2019, 59 premature infants with type 1 ROP in 1 or both eyes were enrolled in a masked, multicenter, dose de-escalation study. In cohorts of 10 to 14 infants, 1 eye per infant received 0.016 mg, 0.008 mg, 0.004 mg, or 0.002 mg of intravitreous bevacizumab. Diluted bevacizumab was prepared by individual research pharmacies and delivered using 300-µL syringes with 5/16-inch, 30-guage fixed needles. Analysis began July 2019. Interventions: Bevacizumab intravitreous injections at 0.016 mg, 0.008 mg, 0.004 mg, or 0.002 mg. Main Outcomes and Measures: Success was defined as improvement by 4 days postinjection and no recurrence of type 1 ROP or severe neovascularization requiring additional treatment within 4 weeks. Results: Fifty-five of 59 enrolled infants had 4-week outcomes completed; the mean (SD) birth weight was 664 (258) g, and the mean (SD) gestational age was 24.8 (1.6) weeks. A successful 4-week outcome was achieved for 13 of 13 eyes (100%) receiving 0.016 mg, 9 of 9 eyes (100%) receiving 0.008 mg, 9 of 10 eyes (90%) receiving 0.004 mg, but only 17 of 23 eyes (74%) receiving 0.002 mg. Conclusions and Relevance: These data suggest that 0.004 mg may be the lowest dose of bevacizumab effective for ROP. Further investigation is warranted to confirm effectiveness of very low-dose intravitreous bevacizumab and its effect on plasma vascular endothelial growth factor levels and peripheral retinal vascularization.
Wan MJ, AlShaker S, Hunter DG. Correction to: Use of Botulinum Toxin in Ophthalmology. Handb Exp Pharmacol 2021;263:283.
Wan MJ, Mantagos IS, Shah AS, Kazlas M, Hunter DG. Comparison of Botulinum Toxin With Surgery for the Treatment of Acute-Onset Comitant Esotropia in Children. Am J Ophthalmol 2017;176:33-39.Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine whether botulinum toxin is as effective as strabismus surgery in the treatment of acute-onset comitant esotropia in children. DESIGN: Retrospective, nonrandomized, comparative clinical study. METHODS: Setting: Tertiary care pediatric hospital. STUDY POPULATION: Forty-nine children with acute-onset comitant esotropia. INTERVENTION: Treatment with either botulinum toxin ("chemodenervation group") or standard incisional strabismus surgery ("surgery group"). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Success rate at 6 months (total horizontal deviation of 10 prism diopters or less and evidence of binocular single vision). RESULTS: There were 16 patients in the chemodenervation group and 33 patients in the surgery group. The success rate was not significantly different at 6 months (81% vs 61%, P = .20) or at 18 months (67% vs 58%, P = .74). The median angle of deviation and median stereoacuity were not significantly different at 6 or 18 months. The chemodenervation procedure was not inferior to incisional strabismus surgery at 6 months. The duration of general anesthesia (5 vs 71 min, P < .001) and time in the post-anesthesia care unit (37 vs 93 min, P < .001) were significantly shorter in the chemodenervation group. Botulinum toxin injection payment averaged $874 per procedure compared with $2783 for strabismus surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Botulinum toxin is at least as effective as surgery in the treatment of acute-onset comitant esotropia at 6 months while reducing the duration of general anesthesia and healthcare costs.

Wan MJ, Chiu H, Shah AS, Hunter DG. Long-term Surgical Outcomes for Large-angle Infantile Esotropia. Am J Ophthalmol 2018;189:155-159.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the long-term surgical outcomes for a cohort of children with large-angle infantile esotropia. DESIGN: Multicenter, nonrandomized clinical study. METHODS: Setting: Two tertiary-care pediatric hospitals. STUDY POPULATION: Children with large-angle (≥55 prism diopters) infantile esotropia. INTERVENTION: Surgical treatment of infantile esotropia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Success rate at final follow-up (postoperative deviation ≤ 10 prism diopters and no need for retreatment). RESULTS: A total of 88 patients with large-angle infantile esotropia were treated during the 13-year study period. Treatment was bilateral medial rectus muscle recessions in 70 patients, botulinum toxin-augmented surgery in 15 patients, and 3-muscle surgery in 3 patients. After a mean follow-up of 40 months, 20 patients (23%) had a successful outcome compared to 68 treatment failures (77%). Of the 68 treatment failures, 59 had residual or recurrent esotropia and 9 had sequential exotropia. On multivariate logistic regression, treatment modality was the only factor significantly associated with a successful outcome. Specifically, patients treated with botulinum toxin-augmented surgery were more likely to have a successful outcome compared to patients treated with bilateral medial rectus muscle recessions. For the 26 patients (30%) who underwent retreatment, the mean number of procedures was 2.1, and 7 (27%) had a deviation of ≤10 prism diopters at final follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The overall success rate for treatment of large-angle infantile esotropia was poor in this cohort, with most failures owing to recurrent or residual esotropia. Botulinum toxin-augmented surgery was associated with a higher success rate at final follow-up.
Wan MJ, Adebona O, Benson LA, Gorman MP, Heidary G. Visual outcomes in pediatric optic neuritis. Am J Ophthalmol 2014;158(3):503-7.e2.Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the visual outcomes of a large cohort of pediatric patients presenting to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with first-episode optic neuritis. DESIGN: Retrospective, observational cohort study. METHODS: In a tertiary care pediatric hospital, patients with first-episode optic neuritis and at least 3 months of follow-up over a 10-year period were assessed and followed-up in the ophthalmology department. The main outcome measures were visual acuity at 3 months and 1 year of follow-up, with analysis of risk factors for poor visual outcomes and the time course of visual recovery. RESULTS: Of the 59 pediatric patients with first-episode optic neuritis, 46 had at least 3 months of follow-up and 36 had at least 1 year of follow-up. The mean age was 12.6 years old; 72% were female, 41% had bilateral involvement, 52% had or developed an underlying diagnosis (39% multiple sclerosis, 7% acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 7% neuromyelitis optica), and 91% received treatment (85% steroids, 7% multimodal). At 1 year, 81% were at least 20/20 and 89% were at least 20/40. A poor visual outcome at 1 year (<20/40) was associated with vision of <20/20 at 3 months (P = 0.041). Other clinical characteristics, including visual acuity at presentation, sex, bilateral involvement, optic nerve edema, and underlying diagnoses were not significantly associated with poor visual outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of pediatric patients with optic neuritis, the majority of patients regained normal visual acuity at 1 year, regardless of baseline clinical characteristics.
Wan MJ, Ullrich NJ, Manley PE, Kieran MW, Goumnerova LC, Heidary G. Long-term visual outcomes of optic pathway gliomas in pediatric patients without neurofibromatosis type 1. J Neurooncol 2016;129(1):173-8.Abstract

Sporadic optic pathway gliomas (OPGs) have been reported to cause more vision loss than OPGs associated with neurofibromatosis type-1, but long-term visual outcome data are limited. The purpose of this study was to report the visual outcomes of a cohort of pediatric patients with sporadic OPGs. This was a retrospective, cohort study at a tertiary care pediatric hospital and cancer institute. The study included all patients with sporadic OPGs evaluated from 1990 to 2014. The primary outcome was visual acuity at final follow-up. Secondary outcomes were risk factors for a poor visual outcome and the rate of progression. There were 59 pediatric patients included in the study. Median age at presentation was 2.5 years old and median follow-up was 5.2 years. In the worse eye at final follow-up, 16 patients (27 %) were 20/30 or better, 9 patients (15 %) were between 20/40 and 20/80, and 34 patients (58 %) were 20/100 or worse. In the better eye at final follow-up, 33 patients (56 %) were 20/30 or better, 11 patients (19 %) were between 20/40 and 20/80, and 15 patients (25 %) were 20/100 or worse. Risk factors for a poor visual outcome included younger age at presentation, optic nerve pallor, and tumor extent. Of the 54 patients (92 %) who received treatment, 40 (74 %) experienced disease progression during or after treatment. A majority of pediatric patients with sporadic OPGs had significant long-term visual impairment. In spite of treatment, tumor progression is common. Serial ophthalmic examinations with quantitative vision measurements are essential in the management of sporadic OPGs.

Wang Y, Rao R, Jacobs DS, Saeed HN. Prosthetic Replacement of the Ocular Surface Ecosystem Treatment for Ocular Surface Disease in Pediatric Patients With Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Am J Ophthalmol 2019;201:1-8.Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the outcomes of prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem (PROSE) treatment in pediatric patients with chronic ocular surface disease associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN). DESIGN: Retrospective, interventional case series. METHODS: Patients aged 18 years or younger seen in consultation for PROSE treatment at a single center between January 1992 and December 2016 with a history of SJS/TEN were reviewed. Demographics, etiology of SJS/TEN, age at treatment milestones, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at treatment milestones, and treatment failures were recorded. BCVA at the initial presentation visit was compared to BCVA at the time of PROSE device dispense and at the last recorded visit. RESULTS: Twenty-seven female and 22 male patients were reviewed. Reported etiology was antibiotic (n = 19), antiepileptic (n = 9), antipyretic (n = 9), other (n = 3), and unknown (n = 9). The mean age was 6.4 years at disease onset and 9.3 years at time of initial presentation. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.45 years. The median BCVA at the initial presentation was 0.6 logMAR (20/80 Snellen), and was significantly improved to 0.18 logMAR (20/30 Snellen) at the time a PROSE device was dispensed (P < .0001). The median BCVA at the last recorded visit was significantly improved to 0.18 logMAR (20/30 Snellen, P = .0004). There were 15 patients who failed PROSE treatment (30.6%). CONCLUSIONS: PROSE treatment is feasible in over two thirds of pediatric patients with chronic ocular surface disease related to SJS/TEN and results in significant improvement in vision that is durable over a period of many years.
Wang JC, Elliott AT. Acute transient large-angle exotropia caused by traumatic orbital contusion. Orbit 2018;:1-3.Abstract
We report an unusual case of acute large-angle left exotropia associated with blunt orbital trauma in a healthy 8-year-old boy. Examination revealed a large-angle left exotropia with limitation in adduction of the left eye. Microhyphema and commotio retinae of the left eye were also present. High-resolution orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated perimuscular and intramuscular edema mostly involving the left medial rectus muscle but also involving the left lateral rectus muscle. The extraocular muscle insertions were intact. Complete resolution of the strabismus and adduction limitation occurred within 24 hours of starting systemic steroid therapy. This case highlights the utility of high-resolution imaging to assess for injury to the extraocular muscles. If disinsertion, transection, or rupture of the muscle is not present on imaging, resolution may occur with systemic steroid therapy and surgical intervention is not needed.
Weng F, Meara JG, Dagi LR. Unicoronal Synostosis. J Pediatr 2019;213:243-243.e1.
Wentworth BA, Freitas-Neto CA, Foster SC. Management of pediatric uveitis. F1000Prime Rep 2014;6:41.Abstract
Pediatric uveitis is a topic of special interest not only because of the unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges but also because of the lifetime burden of vision loss if the problem is not adequately treated, as well as the economic and psychological toll on the family. Often, uveitis in children is discovered as part of a routine eye exam; this silent, insidious inflammation can be difficult to treat and can lead to further complications if not handled skillfully. Corticosteroids have long been the mainstay of therapy; however, the significant associated side effects mandate a corticosteroid-sparing therapeutic regimen in pursuit of remission. In this review, we cover the therapeutic options for pediatric uveitis, specifically focusing on the most common non-infectious varieties, juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis and pars planitis.
West CE, Hunter DG. Displacement of optical centers in over-the-counter readers: a potential cause of diplopia. J AAPOS 2014;18(3):293-4.Abstract
Induced prism in spectacle lenses, which may result from inadvertent displacement of optical centers, may worsen an existing heterophoria or even cause diplopia, yet over-the-counter reading glasses (OTC readers) are not always assessed by clinicians when evaluating patients with diplopia or asthenopia. To gauge the magnitude of this potential problem, we used a focimeter and prescription aligner to assess the frequency and extent of clinically significant manufacturing variations in a random selection of 160 OTC readers. The optical centers were vertically displaced by ≥3 mm in 11%, with a maximum displacement of 7 mm in 1 pair. Average interpupillary distance was 64 mm (range, 58-74.5 mm), with interpupillary distance outside the normal range of 60-70 mm in 5%. Monocular pupillary distance was asymmetric by ≥5 mm in 4%. A 0.75 D power difference between lenses was measured in one pair of OTC readers. Some OTC readers have misaligned optical centers and other manufacturing defects that are of a magnitude sufficient to exacerbate a heterophoria and cause asthenopia or diplopia.
Whitman MC, MacNeill K, Hunter DG. Bifocals Fail to Improve Stereopsis Outcomes in High AC/A Accommodative Esotropia. Ophthalmology 2016;123(4):690-6.Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess whether stereopsis outcomes of patients with accommodative esotropia with high accommodative convergence/accommodation relationship (AC/A) were improved after treatment with bifocal glasses compared with single-vision lenses. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with high AC/A accommodative esotropia; evidence of stereopsis, binocularity (on Worth 4-dot testing), or improvement in near angle with +3.00 D lenses; and at least 4 years of records available for review, who were seen in the Department of Ophthalmology at Boston Children's Hospital between 2006 and 2014. METHODS: Use of bifocal or single-vision glasses. Charts were reviewed retrospectively. Stereopsis was log transformed for statistical analysis. Linear (for stereopsis) or logistic (for surgery) regression was used to control for confounders. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Stereopsis at final follow-up, difference in stereopsis between final and initial visits, and progression to strabismus surgery. Secondary outcomes included final near and distance deviations. RESULTS: Of the 180 patients who met inclusion criteria, 77 used bifocals and 103 used single-vision lenses. Bifocals did not improve stereopsis outcomes compared with single-vision lenses. In both groups, stereopsis was similar at the initial and final visits, with similar improvement in both groups. Children in the bifocal group had a 3.6-fold higher rate of strabismus surgery than children in the single-lens group (P = 0.04.) Additionally, children in the bifocal group had near deviations 4 PD larger than those with single lenses at final follow-up, even after controlling for age and initial deviation (P = 0.02). These results did not change if surgical patients were eliminated or in the subgroup with initial distance deviation of 0 PD in full hyperopic correction. CONCLUSIONS: Despite their widespread use, there is no evidence that bifocals improve outcomes in children with accommodative esotropia with high AC/A. In our retrospective review, children with bifocals had higher surgical rates and a smaller improvement in near deviation over time. Although our results suggest that eliminating bifocals could reduce the cost and complexity of care while potentially improving quality, prospective, randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether a change in practice is warranted.

Wilson ME, O'Halloran H, VanderVeen D, Roarty J, Plager DA, Markwardt K, Gedif K, Lambert SR. Difluprednate versus prednisolone acetate for inflammation following cataract surgery in pediatric patients: a randomized safety and efficacy study. Eye (Lond) 2016;30(9):1187-94.Abstract

PurposeTo evaluate safety and efficacy of difluprednate 0.05% ophthalmic emulsion for treatment of postoperative inflammation after cataract surgery in pediatric patients.MethodsThis was a phase 3B, multicentre, randomized, double-masked, active-controlled study of patients aged 0-3 years who underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery in one eye, with/without intraocular lens implantation. Patients were randomized to receive difluprednate 0.05% four times daily or prednisolone acetate 1% for 14 days post surgery, followed by tapering for 14 days. Safety included evaluation of adverse events. Primary efficacy was the proportion of patients with an anterior cell grade of 0 (no cells) at day 14; secondary efficacy was a global inflammation score.ResultsForty patients were randomized to each treatment group. Adverse drug reactions included corneal oedema (difluprednate 0.5%, n=1; prednisolone acetate 1%, n=0) and increased intraocular pressure or ocular hypertension (n=2/group). Mean intraocular pressure values during treatment were 2-3 mm Hg higher with difluprednate 0.05% compared with prednisolone acetate 1%; mean values were similar between groups by the first week after treatment cessation. At 2 weeks post surgery, the incidence of complete clearing of anterior chamber cells was similar between groups (difluprednate 0.05%, n=30 (78.9%); prednisolone acetate 1%, n=31 (77.5%). Compared with prednisolone acetate 1%, approximately twice as many difluprednate 0.05%-treated patients had a global inflammation assessment score indicating no inflammation on day 1 (n=12 (30.8%) vs n=7 (17.5%) and day 8 (n=18 (48.7%) vs n=10 (25.0%).ConclusionsDifluprednate 0.05% four times daily showed safety and efficacy profiles similar to prednisolone acetate 1% four times daily in children 0-3 years undergoing cataract surgery.

Wilson LB, Melia M, Kraker RT, VanderVeen DK, Hutchinson AK, Pineles SL, Galvin JA, Lambert SR. Accuracy of Autorefraction in Children: A Report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Ophthalmology 2020;127(9):1259-1267.Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this assessment is to evaluate the accuracy of autorefraction compared with cycloplegic retinoscopy in children. METHODS: Literature searches were last conducted in October 2019 in the PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases for studies published in English. The combined searches yielded 118 citations, of which 53 were reviewed in full text. Of these, 31 articles were deemed appropriate for inclusion in this assessment and subsequently assigned a level of evidence rating by the panel methodologists. Four articles were rated level I, 11 were rated level II, and 16 were rated level III articles. The 16 level III articles were excluded from this review. RESULTS: Thirteen of the 15 studies comparing cycloplegic autorefraction with cycloplegic retinoscopy found a mean difference in spherical equivalent or sphere of less than 0.5 diopters (D); most were less than 0.25 D. Even lower mean differences were found when evaluating the cylindrical component of cycloplegic autorefraction versus cycloplegic retinoscopy. Despite low mean variability, there was significant individual measurement variability; the 95% limits of agreement were wide and included clinically relevant differences. Comparisons of noncycloplegic with cycloplegic autorefractions found that noncyloplegic refraction tends to over minus by 1 to 2 D. CONCLUSIONS: Cycloplegic autorefraction is appropriate to use in pediatric population-based studies. Cycloplegic retinoscopy can be valuable in individual clinical cases to confirm the accuracy of cycloplegic autorefraction, particularly when corrected visual acuity is worse than expected or the autorefraction results are not consistent with expected findings.
Wu S, Fan Y, Wu D, Hong J, Xu J. The association of maternal factors with epibulbar dermoid of newborn: a retrospective, matched case-control study. Eye (Lond) 2017;31(7):1099-1105.Abstract
PurposeTo determine the association of maternal factors and exposure during pregnancy with the incidence in newborns of epibulbar dermoid (ED), a congenital ocular surface benign tumor.Patients and methodsThis is a retrospective, paired case-control study in which 121 children with ED (case group) and 121 children without ED (control group) were recruited. Questionnaire-based interviews with mothers of participants were performed and maternal medical records during pregnancy were reviewed. The questionnaire investigated basic information, personal history, environmental exposure, exposure to maternal diseases, symptoms and corresponding medical treatments during pregnancy, and parental socioeconomic status. The case and control participants were matched for sex, birth weight, gestational age, and parental socioeconomic status level. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted with ED as the main outcome variable.ResultsFactors significantly associated with ED were: history of maternal inevitable miscarriage (odds ratio (OR), 2.59; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.13-5.90), common cold in the first trimester (OR, 3.94; CI, 1.74-8.93), and paternal smoke exposure >half a pack per day during pregnancy (OR, 4.81; CI, 1.74-13.28).ConclusionHistory of maternal miscarriage, common cold exposure in the first trimester, and paternal smoking (>half a pack per day) during pregnancy could result in significant risk factors for ED of newborns. These data also imply that paternal smoking delivers nicotine to maternal respiratory system and uterine microenvironment that may both affect microvascular development and predispose the fetus to future ED.

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