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Chou J, Daly MK. Reply. Retina 2017;37(10):e118.
Sobrin L, Chong YH, Fan Q, Gan A, Stanwyck LK, Kaidonis G, Craig JE, Kim J, Liao W-L, Huang Y-C, Lee W-J, Hung Y-J, Guo X, Hai Y, Ipp E, Pollack S, Hancock H, Price A, Penman A, Mitchell P, Liew G, Smith AV, Gudnason V, Tan G, Klein BEK, Kuo J, Li X, Christiansen MW, Psaty BM, Sandow K, Sandow K, Jensen RA, Klein R, Cotch MF, Wang JJ, Jia Y, Chen CJ, Chen Y-DI, Rotter JI, Tsai F-J, Hanis CL, Burdon KP, Wong TY, Cheng C-Y. Genetically Determined Plasma Lipid Levels and Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Mendelian Randomization Study. Diabetes 2017;66(12):3130-3141.Abstract
Results from observational studies examining dyslipidemia as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy (DR) have been inconsistent. We evaluated the causal relationship between plasma lipids and DR using a Mendelian randomization approach. We pooled genome-wide association studies summary statistics from 18 studies for two DR phenotypes: any DR (N = 2,969 case and 4,096 control subjects) and severe DR (N = 1,277 case and 3,980 control subjects). Previously identified lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms served as instrumental variables. Meta-analysis to combine the Mendelian randomization estimates from different cohorts was conducted. There was no statistically significant change in odds ratios of having any DR or severe DR for any of the lipid fractions in the primary analysis that used single nucleotide polymorphisms that did not have a pleiotropic effect on another lipid fraction. Similarly, there was no significant association in the Caucasian and Chinese subgroup analyses. This study did not show evidence of a causal role of the four lipid fractions on DR. However, the study had limited power to detect odds ratios less than 1.23 per SD in genetically induced increase in plasma lipid levels, thus we cannot exclude that causal relationships with more modest effect sizes exist.
Bourne RRA, Flaxman SR, Braithwaite T, Cicinelli MV, Das A, Jonas JB, Keeffe J, Kempen JH, Leasher J, Limburg H, Naidoo K, Pesudovs K, Resnikoff S, Silvester A, Stevens GA, Tahhan N, Wong TY, Taylor HR, Taylor HR. Magnitude, temporal trends, and projections of the global prevalence of blindness and distance and near vision impairment: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Glob Health 2017;5(9):e888-e897.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Global and regional prevalence estimates for blindness and vision impairment are important for the development of public health policies. We aimed to provide global estimates, trends, and projections of global blindness and vision impairment. METHODS: We did a systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based datasets relevant to global vision impairment and blindness that were published between 1980 and 2015. We fitted hierarchical models to estimate the prevalence (by age, country, and sex), in 2015, of mild visual impairment (presenting visual acuity worse than 6/12 to 6/18 inclusive), moderate to severe visual impairment (presenting visual acuity worse than 6/18 to 3/60 inclusive), blindness (presenting visual acuity worse than 3/60), and functional presbyopia (defined as presenting near vision worse than N6 or N8 at 40 cm when best-corrected distance visual acuity was better than 6/12). FINDINGS: Globally, of the 7·33 billion people alive in 2015, an estimated 36·0 million (80% uncertainty interval [UI] 12·9-65·4) were blind (crude prevalence 0·48%; 80% UI 0·17-0·87; 56% female), 216·6 million (80% UI 98·5-359·1) people had moderate to severe visual impairment (2·95%, 80% UI 1·34-4·89; 55% female), and 188·5 million (80% UI 64·5-350·2) had mild visual impairment (2·57%, 80% UI 0·88-4·77; 54% female). Functional presbyopia affected an estimated 1094·7 million (80% UI 581·1-1686·5) people aged 35 years and older, with 666·7 million (80% UI 364·9-997·6) being aged 50 years or older. The estimated number of blind people increased by 17·6%, from 30·6 million (80% UI 9·9-57·3) in 1990 to 36·0 million (80% UI 12·9-65·4) in 2015. This change was attributable to three factors, namely an increase because of population growth (38·4%), population ageing after accounting for population growth (34·6%), and reduction in age-specific prevalence (-36·7%). The number of people with moderate and severe visual impairment also increased, from 159·9 million (80% UI 68·3-270·0) in 1990 to 216·6 million (80% UI 98·5-359·1) in 2015. INTERPRETATION: There is an ongoing reduction in the age-standardised prevalence of blindness and visual impairment, yet the growth and ageing of the world's population is causing a substantial increase in number of people affected. These observations, plus a very large contribution from uncorrected presbyopia, highlight the need to scale up vision impairment alleviation efforts at all levels. FUNDING: Brien Holden Vision Institute.
Hark LA, Katz JL, Myers JS, Waisbourd M, Johnson D, Pizzi LT, Leiby BE, Fudemberg SJ, Mantravadi AV, Henderer JD, Zhan T, Molineaux J, Doyle V, Divers M, Burns C, Murchison AP, Reber S, Resende A, Bui TDV, Lee J, Crews JE, Saaddine JB, Lee PP, Pasquale LR, Haller JA. Philadelphia Telemedicine Glaucoma Detection and Follow-up Study: Methods and Screening Results. Am J Ophthalmol 2017;181:114-124.Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe methodology and screening results from the Philadelphia Telemedicine Glaucoma Detection and Follow-up Study. DESIGN: Screening program results for a prospective randomized clinical trial. METHODS: Individuals were recruited who were African-American, Hispanic/Latino, or Asian over age 40 years; white individuals over age 65 years; and any ethnicity over age 40 years with a family history of glaucoma or diabetes. Primary care offices and Federally Qualified Health Centers were used for telemedicine (Visit 1). Two posterior fundus photographs and 1 anterior segment photograph were captured per eye in each participant, using a nonmydriatic, autofocus, hand-held fundus camera (Volk Optical, Mentor, Ohio, USA). Medical and ocular history, family history of glaucoma, visual acuity, and intraocular pressure measurements using the ICare rebound tonometer (ICare, Helsinki, Finland) were obtained. Images were read remotely by a trained retina reader and a glaucoma specialist. RESULTS: From April 1, 2015, to February 6, 2017, 906 individuals consented and attended Visit 1. Of these, 553 participants were female (61.0%) and 550 were African-American (60.7%), with a mean age of 58.7 years. A total of 532 (58.7%) participants had diabetes, and 616 (68%) had a history of hypertension. During Visit 1, 356 (39.3%) participants were graded with a normal image. Using image data from the worse eye, 333 (36.8%) were abnormal and 155 (17.1%) were unreadable. A total of 258 (28.5%) had a suspicious nerve, 62 (6.8%) had ocular hypertension, 102 (11.3%) had diabetic retinopathy, and 68 (7.5%) had other retinal abnormalities. CONCLUSION: An integrated telemedicine screening intervention in primary care offices and Federally Qualified Health Centers detected high rate of suspicious optic nerves, ocular hypertension, and retinal pathology.
Nocera AL, Miyake MM, Seifert P, Han X, Bleier BS. Exosomes mediate interepithelial transfer of functional P-glycoprotein in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps. Laryngoscope 2017;127(9):E295-E300.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: P-glycoprotein (P-gp) drives type-2 helper T-cell inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) through unknown posttranslational mechanisms of overexpression. A recent randomized clinical trial demonstrated that inhibition of P-gp was as effective as oral steroids and biologics in treating CRSwNP. Exosomes are 30- to 150-nm vesicles capable of intercellular membrane protein transfer. The aims of this study were 1) to determine whether CRSwNP mucus exosomes are enriched with P-gp, and 2) whether exosomal P-gp can be functionally transferred to autologous epithelial cells as a putative mechanism for the proinflammatory overexpression of P-gp in CRSwNP. STUDY DESIGN: Institutional review board-approved study in CRSwNP and control patients (n = 10 per group). METHODS: P-gp content of purified mucus exosomes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Epithelial transfer of exosomal P-gp was determined by time-lapse fluorescent microscopy and calcein acetoxymethylester functional P-gp assay. RESULTS: CD63+/P-gp+ exosomes were detected in both groups. P-gp was significantly enriched in CRSwNP exosomes relative to control (median 198.5; interquartile range 123.6-270.5 vs. 74.4; 41.3-95.0 pcg P-gp/10(9) exosomes, P = 0.002). Exosomes were absorbed by epithelial cells within 10 minutes, resulting in a significant increase in P-gp activity in CRSwNP patients relative to control (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: Here we demonstrate the presence and P-gp enrichment of mucus-derived exosomes, or rhinosomes, in CRSwNP. These rhinosomes are capable of rapid intercellular transfer of P-gp, leading to increased P-gp function within recipient cells. This represents a novel mechanism for maintaining P-gp overexpression in CRSwNP, and more generally for interepithelial transfer of other proteins between mucosal epithelial cells. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: NA. Laryngoscope, 127:E295-E300, 2017.
Wang JC, Finn AP, Grotting LA, Sobrin L. Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy Associated With Retrobulbar Optic Neuritis. J Neuroophthalmol 2017;37(3):287-290.Abstract
A 17-year-old girl presented with unilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis as well as bilateral funduscopic findings and outer retinal dysfunction suggestive of acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Fundus autofluorescence abnormalities, visual field loss, and electroretinographic changes were supportive of bilateral AZOOR. MRI was consistent with the diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), which is defined as a central nervous system demyelinating event that may herald the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). While AZOOR previously has been linked to MS and demyelinating white matter lesions in the brain, our case seems unique due to concurrent development of AZOOR and retrobulbar optic neuritis as a CIS.
Tsikata E, Vercellin Verticchio AC, Falkenstein I, Poon LY-C, Brauner S, Khoueir Z, Miller JB, Chen TC. Volumetric Measurement of Optic Nerve Head Drusen Using Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography. J Glaucoma 2017;26(9):798-804.Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe new software tools for quantifying optic nerve head drusen volume using 3-dimensional (3D) swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) volumetric scans. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SS-OCT was used to acquire raster volume scans of 8 eyes of 4 patients with bilateral optic nerve head drusen. The scans were manually segmented by 3 graders to identify the drusen borders, and thereafter total drusen volumes were calculated. Linear regression was performed to study the relationships between drusen volume, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and Humphrey visual field mean deviation. RESULTS: In the 8 study eyes, drusen volumes ranged between 0.24 to 1.05 mm. Visual field mean deviation decreased by ∼20 dB per cubic millimeter increase in drusen volume, and the coefficient of correlation of the linear regression was 0.92. In this small patient series, visual field defects were detected when drusen volume was larger than about 0.2 mm. CONCLUSIONS: Software tools have been developed to quantify the size of OHND using SS-OCT volume scans.
Heidary G. Neuro-Ophthalmic Manifestations of Pediatric Neurodegenerative Disease. J Neuroophthalmol 2017;37 Suppl 1:S4-S13.Abstract
The topic of pediatric neurodegenerative disease is broad and ever expanding. Children who suffer from neurodegenerative disease often have concomitant visual dysfunction. Neuro-ophthalmologists may become involved in clinical care to identify corroborating eye findings when a specific condition is suspected, to monitor for disease progression, and in some cases, to assess treatment efficacy. Ophthalmic findings also may be the harbinger of a neurodegenerative process so a keen awareness of the possible manifestations of these conditions is important. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of the neuro-ophthalmic manifestations of pediatric neurodegenerative disease using a case-based approach in an effort to provide a framework for approaching these complex patients.
Mishra A, Browning D, Haviland MJ, Jackson ML, Luff D, Meyer EC, Talcott K, Kloek CE. Communication Skills Training in Ophthalmology: Results of a Needs Assessment and Pilot Training Program. J Surg Educ 2017;Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To conduct a needs assessment to identify gaps in communication skills training in ophthalmology residency programs and to use these results to pilot a communication workshop that prepares residents for difficult conversations. DESIGN: A mixed-methods design was used to perform the needs assessment. A pre-and postsurvey was administered to workshop participants. SETTING: Mass Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School (HMS), Department of Ophthalmology. PARTICIPANTS: HMS ophthalmology residents from postgraduate years 2-4 participated in the needs assessment and the workshop. Ophthalmology residency program directors in the United States participated in national needs assessment. METHODS: Ophthalmology program directors across the United States were queried on their perception of resident communication skills training through an online survey. A targeted needs assessment in the form of a narrative exercise captured resident perspectives on communication in ophthalmology from HMS residents. A group of HMS residents participated in the pilot workshop and a pre- and postsurvey was administered to participants to assess its effectiveness. RESULTS: The survey of program directors yielded a response rate of 40%. Ninety percent of respondents agreed that the communication skills training in their programs could be improved. Fifteen of 24 residents (62%) completed the needs assessment. Qualitative analysis of the narrative material revealed four themes; (1) differing expectations, (2) work role and environment, (3) challenges specific to ophthalmology, and (4) successful strategies adopted. Nine residents participated in the workshop. There was a significant improvement post-workshop in resident reported scores on their ability to manage their emotions during difficult conversations (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: There is an opportunity to improve communication skills training in ophthalmology residency through formalized curriculum.
Tischfield MA, Robson CD, Gilette NM, Chim SM, Sofela FA, DeLisle MM, Gelber A, Barry BJ, MacKinnon S, Dagi LR, Nathans J, Engle EC. Cerebral Vein Malformations Result from Loss of Twist1 Expression and BMP Signaling from Skull Progenitor Cells and Dura. Dev Cell 2017;42(5):445-461.e5.Abstract
Dural cerebral veins (CV) are required for cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption and brain homeostasis, but mechanisms that regulate their growth and remodeling are unknown. We report molecular and cellular processes that regulate dural CV development in mammals and describe venous malformations in humans with craniosynostosis and TWIST1 mutations that are recapitulated in mouse models. Surprisingly, Twist1 is dispensable in endothelial cells but required for specification of osteoprogenitor cells that differentiate into preosteoblasts that produce bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Inactivation of Bmp2 and Bmp4 in preosteoblasts and periosteal dura causes skull and CV malformations, similar to humans harboring TWIST1 mutations. Notably, arterial development appears normal, suggesting that morphogens from the skull and dura establish optimal venous networks independent from arterial influences. Collectively, our work establishes a paradigm whereby CV malformations result from primary or secondary loss of paracrine BMP signaling from preosteoblasts and dura, highlighting unique cellular interactions that influence tissue-specific angiogenesis in mammals.
Ferrari C, Vecchi T, Merabet LB, Cattaneo Z. Blindness and social trust: The effect of early visual deprivation on judgments of trustworthiness. Conscious Cogn 2017;55:156-164.Abstract
Investigating the impact of early visual deprivation on evaluations related to social trust has received little attention to date. This is despite consistent evidence suggesting that early onset blindness may interfere with the normal development of social skills. In this study, we investigated whether early blindness affects judgments of trustworthiness regarding the actions of an agent, with trustworthiness representing the fundamental dimension in the social evaluation. Specifically, we compared performance between a group of early blind individuals with that of sighted controls in their evaluation of trustworthiness of an agent after hearing a pair of two positive or two negative social behaviors (impression formation). Participants then repeated the same evaluation following the presentation of a third (consistent or inconsistent) behavior regarding the same agent (impression updating). Overall, blind individuals tended to give similar evaluations compared to their sighted counterparts. However, they also valued positive behaviors significantly more than sighted controls when forming their impression of an agent's trustworthiness. Moreover, when inconsistent information was provided, blind individuals were more prone to revise their initial evaluation compared to controls. These results suggest that early visual deprivation may have a dramatic effect on the evaluation of social factors such as trustworthiness.
Ahmed AH, Foster SC, Shields CL. Association of Disease Location and Treatment With Survival in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Eye and Ocular Adnexal Region. JAMA Ophthalmol 2017;135(10):1062-1068.Abstract
Importance: Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the ocular region is rare, and the utility of surgery and radiation therapy remains unresolved. Objective: To explore the clinical characteristics and determine factors associated with overall survival in primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) and ocular adnexal (OA)-uveal DLBCL. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective analysis included 396 patients with ophthalmic DLBCL from January 1, 1973, through December 31, 2014, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The median follow-up was 39.0 months (interquartile range, 5.1-72.9 months). All patients diagnosed with primary DLBCL of the eye or retina (PVRL) or the eyelid, conjunctiva, choroid, ciliary body, lacrimal gland, or orbit (OA-uveal lymphoma) were included. Patients diagnosed at autopsy or with additional neoplastic disease were excluded. Main Outcomes and Measures: Patient demographic characteristics, disease location, treatment modalities, and overall survival. Results: Forty-seven patients with PVRL (24 women [51.1%] and 23 men [48.9%]) and 349 with OA-uveal DLBCL (192 women [55.0%] and 157 men [45.0%]) had a similar mean (SD) age at diagnosis (69.6 [12.3] vs 66.1 [17.7] years). No difference in the use of surgery or radiation therapy by location was found. For all PVRL and OA-uveal DLBCL, a Cox proportional hazards regression model affirmed that age older than 60 years was associated with increased risk for death (hazard ratio [HR], 2.7; 95% CI, 1.9-4.0; P < .001). Gross total resection was associated with a decreased risk for death (HR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9; P = .04), whereas radiation therapy was not. The 5-year overall survival among patients with PVRL was 41.4% (SE, 8.6%); among those with OA-uveal DLBCL, 59.1% (SE, 2.8%; Mantel-Cox test, P = .007). Median overall survival was lower in PVRL (38.0 months; 95% CI, 14.2-61.8 months) than in OA-uveal DLBCL (96.0 months; 95% CI, 67.3-124.7 months; Mantel-Cox test, P = .007). In addition, median overall survival in ophthalmic-only disease was higher (84.0 months; 95% CI, 63.2-104.8 months) than that in primary DLBCL that occurred outside the central nervous system and ophthalmic regions (46.0 months; 95% CI, 44.4-47.6 months; Mantel-Cox test, P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: The 5-year survival in PVRL vs OA-uveal DLBCL differed by 17.7%, and overall survival was greater in ophthalmic DLBCL than in DLBCL located outside the central nervous system and ophthalmic regions. Younger age (≤60 years) and gross total resection were associated with increased survival.
Li D, Li T, Paschalis EI, Wang H, Taniguchi EV, Choo Z-N, Shoji MK, Greenstein SH, Brauner SC, Turalba AV, Pasquale LR, Shen LQ. Optic Nerve Head Characteristics in Chronic Angle Closure Glaucoma Detected by Swept-Source OCT. Curr Eye Res 2017;42(11):1450-1457.Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare structural features in prelaminar and laminar tissues of the optic nerve head (ONH) in chronic angle closure glaucoma (CACG), primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), and control subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ONH imaging was performed using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) for measurements of minimum rim width at Bruch's membrane opening (BMO-MRW), horizontal, and vertical lamina cribrosa depth (LCD). Prelaminar defects, categorized as hole and wedge, and lamina cribrosa (LC) defects were identified. Enhanced depth imaging spectral domain OCT (EDI-OCT) customized to perform high-resolution volume scans was used in conjunction to further characterize prelaminar holes. One eye per subject was analyzed. RESULTS: Eighty subjects (20 CACG, 40 POAG, and 20 controls) were included in the study. CACG and POAG groups had similar mean deviation on Humphrey visual field testing (-6.9 ± 5.1 vs. -6.3 ± 6.0 dB, p > 0.05) and IOP on the day of imaging (14.0 ± 3.1 vs. 13.8 ± 2.7 mmHg, p > 0.05). Thinnest and global BMO-MRW in CACG (120.3 ± 44.8, 225.5 ± 53.9 μm) and POAG (109.7 ± 56.3, 213.8 ± 59.7 μm) groups were lower than controls (200.1 ± 40.8, 308.3 ± 70.8 μm; p < 0.001 for both). Prelaminar holes were most frequent in CACG (65.0%) than POAG (25.0%, p=0.008) or control groups (20.0%, p=0.01). After adjusting for demographic and ophthalmic covariates, CACG was associated with increased odds of having prelaminar holes compared to POAG (odds ratio, 9.79; 95% CI, 2.12-45.19; p=0.003). Hole volume was similar between CACG and POAG (p > 0.05), but the CACG group had more holes per scan than POAG (maximum 2.5 ± 1.9 vs. 1.2 ± 0.4, p=0.02). Prelaminar wedge defects were less common in the CACG than the POAG group (5.0% vs. 37.5%, p=0.02). The CACG group did not differ from controls in laminar characteristics, such as LCD and LC defects. CONCLUSIONS: SS-OCT evaluation of the ONH revealed more frequent prelaminar holes in CACG compared to POAG and control patients.

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